300 RUM scope help

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by EFR, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. EFR

    EFR Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking for some seasoned scope advice.

    I am having a 300 RUM built right now (Bartlein #3 barrel/Borden action) and am debating optics. I think I have it narrowed down to Swarovski Z5 3.5-18x44 with BDC turret, or Premier Optics light hunter 3-15x50 with mil dot reticle.

    I am new to the long range game and want to get it right. I like the light weight of the Swarovski, known quality, known warranty, and I very much like the new BDC turret which can be dialed to yardage (I am aware of altitude/temperature differences and their effects on ballistics). I like the idea of being able to range and dial a number, not having to look up charts or tables, or commit to memory, especially when my target may be walking out of sight.

    What I don't like about the Swarovski is the limited elevation, my calculations put me +/- 700 yards, and coarse adjustments versus dialing.

    What I like about the Premier is the ability to dial into exact ranges and the mil dot reticle, which could be used for holdover. What I don't like is the weight, and, I don't know a lot about the company. There reputation as far as I can see is outstanding, but their own sight refers you to a site that does not exist.

    I can't tell you how far I will be shooting to, until I work up to there. I'm trying to put together good components so I will be able to shoot far, hence, that is why I am questioning the Z5 (and its limited elevation). At the same time, I just carried a heavy barreled rifle between 8-10K' in Colorado for 8 days, and with a pack, spotter, tripod, etc, it wasn't the joy it is at the range.

    Any advice or suggestions is appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. BCMAG2

    BCMAG2 Well-Known Member

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    Dec 25, 2012
    It is not clear from your post what you consider to be "long range" shooting. You've indicated that you are aware of the effects of altitude and temperature on ballistics, but then you state that you want a yardage marked dial for ease of use. Beyond 600 yards, you can not have it both ways, in my experience. The effects of barometric pressure, temperature, humidity, shot angle, etc., on trajectory become too great to effectively generalize with a yardage marked turret. So in my view at least, if you want to take ethical shots at game beyond 600 yards, you need MOA marked turrets. As for speed of correction, check out the G7 BR2 range finder sold on this site. With one push of the button it measures range, shot angle, baro, and temp, and gives you the MOA corrections based on your exact load inputs almost instantly, and it works to 1400 yards.

    As for your choice in scopes, out West its either Nightforce 5.5-22x or Leupold 6.5-20 LRT, usually depending on your budget.
     
  3. EFR

    EFR Well-Known Member

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    BCMAG2: That is exactly the kind of help I am looking for. As for my intended range, well, I'd like to be able to shoot as far as possible. My limiting factor will most likely be my skill. Ranging, dialing, and holding seems pretty easy. The wind is what I don't trust, and probably separates the men from the boys. I hope to practice over 1K, but shots at game will only be as far as I know I can put the bullet where I want.

    I had not heard a lot about that rangefinder. I like the idea of it and will look into same.

    Do you feel the 15X range of the Premier is sufficient past 800-1K yds?

    Again, thanks for your input.

    Erik
     
  4. Dgd6mm

    Dgd6mm Well-Known Member

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    This is absolutely some of the most sensible information giving. I learned something.:D
     
  5. BCMAG2

    BCMAG2 Well-Known Member

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    I also soot a 300 RUM, with a 230 gr Berger at 3030 fps. I place my upper range limits on elk at 1200 yards. Targets (like rocks or coyotes) however, are hittable to a mile. When I had this rig built, I never imagined I would shoot a mile, and 4 months later I was doing just that. What I'm saying here is that you want to buy a scope with more magnification than you now think you will ever need. Because once you shoot 800 yards, then you'll want to shoot 1,000, and so forth. I have the Leupold 6.5-20x50mm LRT with TMR reticle, and I now wish I'd bought the 8-25X model. Live and learn. Get the most and best scope you can afford, and you will not regret it. Good shooting.
     
  6. EFR

    EFR Well-Known Member

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    Thanks BCMAG2. That was the seasoned advice I was looking for. Merry Christmas.