What would you pack for a day hunt?

Pro2A

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Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
84
I've always hunted whitetail within a quarter mile of the cabin. Close enough it's easy to come back in when things seem dead. My cousin got married and has step kids now, so now there's competition for all the close spots. I've got a few spots a mile plus into the woods scouted out, but now I need to figure out what to take with me since it'll be more worth it to stay out all day.

Generally I'm figuring snacks, hydration, first aid, rain gear, extra warm layer, field dressing kit. Am I missing anything obvious? Eastern Oklahoma by the way.
UH....put electronic dog collars on the kids....so your cousin can find them if they turn out to be worthwhile..... and let them do the hiking to the distant stands. It will build character and respect for the old guys having rank. Give them something to look forward to. Just sleep with one eye open.
 

DSheetz

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Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
339
We all have and are entitled to our own opinions of what we should have in our day pack . We have formed them by what has happened to us or someone we know . It's interesting to see what these thoughts are and how they change with the areas that we hunt in . Some of us don't mind not having comfort items , some of us want comfort items as well as survival items , some of think that all we need is the bare necessities . Some of us have lived in the jungles or desert without much and now want some comfort in our lives , some of us have lived our lives with out much and don't want much to this day . I think that is what makes the United States such a great place to live . At this time it looks like a lot of us are going to be going through some hard times compared to what we are now used to , my God bless us all .
 

Don A Parsons

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Aug 12, 2016
Messages
1,035
Location
Some Where in America
I shared this on the backpack hunting thread...

I don't think it applies to the OP since he' and his hunting group are well with in their safe zone of a few miles from their cabin...

But if someone was thinking about going a bit further and would enjoy a bit more comforts ,,, then maybe the 9.4 lbs all in gear including the backpack + the extra 2 to 3 lbs of dried food and water idea would be wizer...

Thats not including the cloths,,, boots,,, rifle,,, and its extras...

A 10 to 15 all in backpack is true freedom...

Allan has 50+ years of traveling the world,,, 22 years of that in the ultra light catagory...

It took the load off his feet,,, knees,,, back and shoulders,,, he said its like finding a new freedom into his adventures,,, yes that its not the cream-de- Cadillac of luxury,,, but its just enough to make that over nigther a bit more comfortable then not having nothing at all if things go South...

Again,,,,,,,,,,,, to each their own...

Enjoy the read if the 9 ish lb idea fits ones needs,,, just a way to share in the good times...

Ultralight Backpacking Gear List | 9 Pound

Don
 

Bwana Barry

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2012
Messages
6
Location
Napier Sa - 50km from the most S point of African
In non-dangerous terrain in S Africa, the list will vary, depending on season (extreme cold or extreme heat), the following apart from the few basics - given that one does not get lost for days, which is totally impossible, as farms / ranches are divided into big fenced camps with tracks which WILL eventually lead you to the vehicle or farm-house etc in a matter of hours:
* Water
* Four slices of bread with jam or peanut butter
I have been"lost" a few times on big farms in Namibia (12000 Ha), but have never had reason to be concerned that my life is threatened - climb a hill and scout.
One must actually cater and prepare if something goes wrong physically, so I will add:
* Pain killers
* A good two-way radio
* A good head lamp
* Toilet paper (To also mark a tree where animal is lying, and on bushes/trees on route to vehicle / road etc (which you can follow back to collect - without getting lost and not knowing the exact spot !!)
A few small hand-held flares to use if you have a broken leg whatever...
The farmer will always come and look for you after dark.....
 

Beer Baron

New Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Colorado
I've always hunted whitetail within a quarter mile of the cabin. Close enough it's easy to come back in when things seem dead. My cousin got married and has step kids now, so now there's competition for all the close spots. I've got a few spots a mile plus into the woods scouted out, but now I need to figure out what to take with me since it'll be more worth it to stay out all day.

Generally I'm figuring snacks, hydration, first aid, rain gear, extra warm layer, field dressing kit. Am I missing anything obvious? Eastern Oklahoma by the way.
All of the above plus; small tarp, fire starter, storm proof matches, game bags, shooting stick, emergency blanket, para cord, 2 knives, 5 hour energy, Garmin. The tarp is really handy for keeping meat clean if you have to quarter and pack out, also doubles as an emergency shelter.
 

MNbogboy

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Joined
Jul 14, 2009
Messages
667
Location
Northern MN
All of the above plus; small tarp, fire starter, storm proof matches, game bags, shooting stick, emergency blanket, para cord, 2 knives, 5 hour energy, Garmin. The tarp is really handy for keeping meat clean if you have to quarter and pack out, also doubles as an emergency shelter.
When hunting in the West, there is always a small "tarp" in my pack. Although I haven't thought of it as shelter (but now I will). I make these from approx 3' x 3' pieces of building wrap (Tyvek type). I use these for placing meat chunks on while boning the carcass.
Unlike plastic sheeting, the meat doesn't "stick" to it. The sheet can be folded over the meat to keep dust/etc from during the butchering process. These "tarps" are light but serve the purpose well.
I think I may increase the size somewhat to double serve as a "shelter tarp". Thanks for the idea.

On a side note in MN & WI we are not allowed to bone meat in the field because they say the carcass is littering! Dumb rules as far as this old man goes.
 

zog

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Sep 21, 2017
Messages
98
Location
Billings MT
Wow, RedDirt, 8 pages of thread in less than two days! I guess several of us are really interested in what others pack. And/or sitting in hibernation with nothing to do!

Some are quite proud of what they pack, and some even more proud of what they don't pack. One person can't experience it all, so sharing others' experiences really helps. After reading this I've removed and added a few things on my checklist.
 
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wv270wsm

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Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
317
I’ve previously posted what I normally take in mine back on page 1 maybe 2 . But to all those who are on the don’t take nothing more than a knife and gun one quick question . Do you carry a spare tire in your vehicle? It’s kinda the same thing . Not trying to start an argument but just saying
 
Last edited:

DSheetz

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Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
339
Do you mean tire instead of title ? wv270wsm spell check may have changed it for you .
 

Beer Baron

New Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
4
Location
Colorado
When hunting in the West, there is always a small "tarp" in my pack. Although I haven't thought of it as shelter (but now I will). I make these from approx 3' x 3' pieces of building wrap (Tyvek type). I use these for placing meat chunks on while boning the carcass.
Unlike plastic sheeting, the meat doesn't "stick" to it. The sheet can be folded over the meat to keep dust/etc from during the butchering process. These "tarps" are light but serve the purpose well.
I think I may increase the size somewhat to double serve as a "shelter tarp". Thanks for the idea.

On a side note in MN & WI we are not allowed to bone meat in the field because they say the carcass is littering! Dumb rules as far as this old man goes.
That is absurd, bones add weight and retain heat making it harder to cool the meat. Packing out an elk is hard enough. I also use the tarp to hang the meat if I have to leave it in the field overnight. Once I left most of a raghorn bull wrapped in a tarp on the ground, came back the next day and had to track my skinned and boned meat because something scattered it.
 

zog

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Joined
Sep 21, 2017
Messages
98
Location
Billings MT
Do you carry a spare tire in your vehicle? It’s kinda the same thing . Not trying to start an argument but just saying
You seriously carry a spare tire? Man up! Don't get a flat and you won't need a spare. How about a spare transmission? Shoot, man, by the time you're done, you might as well pull a 5th wheel with a shop. You city drivers amaze me.
 

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