What grain bullet

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Coyote204, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. Coyote204

    Coyote204 New Member

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    Sep 19, 2011
    I have a Sako model 75 in 300 win mag. Most if you probably know it has a 1:11 twist. I have been shooting 180 and 185 gr bullets. I have trued a number of different ones. So far nothing very impressive. Would a 165 gr be better for this twist or maybe a 200gr? I don't reload currently. And I will use this gun for hunting.


    Thanks
     
  2. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    Some rifles are pretty forgiving and shoot most loads fairly well.

    Others are very particular.

    The advantage of handloading is that you can work up a custom load by testing a couple of rounds for each change to a control variable without spending a fortune.

    With factory ammo, you have to buy a whole box at a time which costs money and barrel life.

    With a 1:11" twist, I'd probably try stepping down to 165gr before stepping up to 200gr. But, 200gr is borderline and may work depending on seating depth, powder, MV, etc.

    Don't forget that the all copper bullets are longer for a given weight and usually require the same twist as the next heavier lead jacketed bullets.

    -- richard
     
  3. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    "Nothing very impressive" doesn't mean much. The problem could be your expectations, your shooting skills, your ammo selection, the conditions, or the rifle. You may know which but we can't guess from the above information.

    My advice would be to carefully shoot at least one 5 shot group of each type of ammo you test at the distance you most expect to hunt. The target should have a calibrated scale. An inch grid is suitable.. On each target record the distance, elevation, barometric pressure, temperature, wind velocity, direction, and variability, your shooting style (offhand, bench etc) and the ammo used. Then photograph each target.

    No one can answer your question better than you, , but if you post the pictures of the targets some here can indicate if your accuracy is reasonable for the rifle and conditions and if it's not give suggestions of the cause.
     
  4. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    If it's a factory sporter barrel hunting rifle, then you may want to concentrate on multiple 3 shot groups with lots of cooling in between groups.

    The first cold bore shot for each group is absolutely worth comparing across groups for consistency.