WHAT CALIBER???

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by rgvt4, Jan 8, 2019.


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  1. Satterlee Scott

    Satterlee Scott Well-Known Member

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    Dec 23, 2018
    Buy lighter boots, spend more on a lighter pack or any other hunting support gear. Make sure your rifle can handle the hunt. At 12 pounds my rifle is as light as I can get it and still perform when I need to or one of my clients needs to take a shot.
     
    L.Sherm likes this.
  2. charliewhisky

    charliewhisky Member

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    Sep 7, 2010
    I started the 30-06 piece of this and have been very interested in the replies. I started long range this year and have found that practice and form are the key. I am currently shooting iron at 500 yards using a mil-dot scope and concentrating on holdover rather than dialing in the drop for my shots. I am hitting very consistently and have an expectation of shooting out farther at some point. The purpose of the detail is to point out that although I am aiming for long distance hunting, it is never simple and the expectation should be that when hunting long range you have to be ready and capable of switching fast. Rifle weight, and barrel length becomes a concern, as does bullet performance at normal hunting ranges. Of three dear taken this year, a doe was taken with a tripod at 218 yds, a buck offhand at 50 yds, and a buck sitting offhand on a slope at from 20 feet. Based on the exit wounds, there was little or no expansion on the 180BT Nosler for the 218 and 50 yard kills. Their was no exit wound on the frontal shot on a 20 ft buck charging uphill at me. My rifle is a Model 700 in long range with a 26 inch barrel and at about 12 lbs it is a bear to bring on target at close range or for snap shots. I am going to move to a 200gr ELD-X for possible better expansion at close range and dependable penetration on longer range shots. More exercise is also on the agenda because of the rifle weight.
     
  3. Triggerhead Ed

    Triggerhead Ed Active Member

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    Sep 3, 2015
    300 Win Mag
    Pick your amo 215VLD or
    225 ELD
    Send one to your gun smith have him camber for that load
     
  4. mountainman83

    mountainman83 Well-Known Member

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    Jun 14, 2012
    Since you Do Not Reload and factory ammo is a big consideration.

    You can’t go wrong with the
    300 Win Mag

    Not only is ammo available everywhere, but it is and always will be a proven cartridge
     
  5. mountaincarver

    mountaincarver Well-Known Member

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    Jan 24, 2015
    ok, I chewed on that and I think you know a lot more than me about the history you have provided here. I respect your opinion on the 300 WM would be the best choice. thanks for the info, interesting. as far as me educating you on new technology, no I wont. I do think the idea of factory chambered firearms shooting factory loaded ammo with heavy long high bc bullets that fit into the mag is a good idea tho.
     
    Satterlee Scott likes this.
  6. Satterlee Scott

    Satterlee Scott Well-Known Member

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    Meh on the history lesson. New is cool! if supported it's typically better. If we want to go back and get a history lesson the 6.5x55 is one of the great grandfathers of all modern metallic high performance cartridges with modern metal, actions and chamberings I get 2900 plus FPS with 140s not bad for a 125 year old cartridge pre dates 30-06 by 12 years
     
    Triggerhead Ed likes this.
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    There's nothing that can be done with a .30 caliber bullet inside of 1200yds that can't be done and done very well with a .300wm.
     
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  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to thoroughly proven cartridges in the US the two highest on the list would probably be the 06 and 300wm. From military use to medium, large, and dangerous game they've been doing the job for more than 70 years in the case of the WM and for over a hundred in the case of the 06.

    The biggest difference in the two is the added velocity and energy of the wm.
     
  9. KyCarl

    KyCarl Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    A lot of guys have touted reloading and everything they say about better more consistent ammo is true! But if you consider the costs of everything you really need to produce a first class round? Then if your time is worth anything ..just how many
    rounds do you have to reload before you are in the black.. not saving just the break even point?
     
  10. L.Sherm

    L.Sherm Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    To be able to shoot LR accurately you have to put in the TIME. To be able to do it accurately it has to be consistent. Learning to shoot LR is not cheap and takes time. If you wanna cut corners then I dont think your 100 dedicated to what it takes. You dont have to have some of the bells and whistles to put together good rounds. 5 boxs of 60.00 ammo Equalls 300.00 and that's just about enough to get a RCBS kit and get started.
    It takes 100 rounds just to get the barrel settled down to to where it should be consistent so you already got 300.00 to that point.
     
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  11. trhall

    trhall Well-Known Member

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    It all depends on how much you are going to shoot and what kind of performance you want. If you take the 300 wm for an example there are only a couple places where you can get custom ammo made that would be equivalent to what you can create reloading. Let's use Copper Creek Cartidge https://coppercreekammo.com/. For custom ammo with the 215 Berger Hybrid and quality Norma brass you're looking at $80 per box of 20.
    I don't factor in the cost of my reloading equipment because I think it's pretty hard to try and amortize it over a lifetime plus as most of my equipment will be passed down to my kids. Also loading for multiple cartridges adds to the complexity of figuring that out.
    I think the only reasonable cost comparison is using the above mentioned custom ammo verses the cartridge components.

    Powder - H1000 76.5gr = $0.27 per shell at $25/lb
    Bullet - 215 Berger $0.57
    Primer - CCI 250 = $0.03
    Brass - Winchester = $0.55 ea usable 10 time = $0.05
    Total cost = $0.92 ea x 20 = $18.40 per box compared to $80

    It doesn't take alot of shooting over a few years to recover you initial spend.
     
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  12. KyCarl

    KyCarl Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    If you don't have any equipment press dies scales tube mic. calipers case prep stuff
    and components. You have to look at the total outlay? So I think at least 3X's your total would be a fair starting point. I'm talking starting from scratch with nothing..
    Can you finish 1 box an hour? I have been Seriously looking into buying everything
    and try to consider as much information as possible And I'm using myself as the example...?.
     
  13. Swamplord

    Swamplord Well-Known Member

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    If you're going into reloading to "save money" you're doing it wrong and just stick to factory ammo
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
    FIGJAM likes this.
  14. trhall

    trhall Well-Known Member

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    You'll have to come up with you own formula then. How many years and rounds loaded are you going to use for your amortization schedule to come up with that value per cartridge?
    Wanting to shoot long range consistently is not a cheap proposition. If you're able to find everything that meets your expectations at a cost that you are happy with, more power to you.
    I think you'll find that most of the folks on here that actually hunt long range and or seriously target shoot long range, meaning 600 yards and beyond reload mainly for two reasons.
    1 - Often it is not possible to find factory ammo equivalent to what you can create reloading.
    2 - If you can find it the cost is usually similar to what I quoted you you above and it doesn't take alot of shooting to recover that.

    Anyhow buddy, it's all a personal choice you'll have to make.

    Best of luck to you....