Thoughts on preferred barrel blanks barrels with 5 r rifling

bluejay75

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2021
Messages
152
Location
North Carolina
Bluejay: 700 SA which is why I needed to go short throat since max COAL is 2.90 in my AICS for reliable feed. The shorter throat helped manage jump. But with 166 HH that goes away.
What did you have to do to make it work? Bolt and all that stayed the same?
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,837
Location
Michigan
Since the 700 has short COAL capacity the only way I could address the desire to load as close to the lands was to shorten the throat so the bullet jump is reduced. It does hamper your reloading when the rifle has short COAL capacity. The throat is still within SAAMI but on the short side of the range.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,837
Location
Michigan
As long as still SAAMI, yes. Factory is loaded to SAAMI. There may be a bullet that has an ogive that is problem but not likely in factory.
 

milo-2

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2011
Messages
1,207
Location
Gillette, Wy
Not that can be reasonably measured. The 5R benefit is how the rifling engages the bullet opposite the grooves. The bullet is thought to be better supported traveling down the barrel.
I was under the assumption "R" meant radiused rifling, same, w/o the sharpness of the edges of the rifling.
Could one tell the difference between a 5R barrel, and a reg cut barrel with 300 rds down it?
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,837
Location
Michigan
General definition:
5R is a 5-groove rifling pattern with sloped or angled sides to the lands. All rifling has a certain amount of angle to the sides of the lands as a natural effect of the rifling process. The sides of the grooves are parallel, but the sides of the lands are not and the 5R carries this to an extreme.

So why should this be good? It is felt the 5R may seal off the bullet better. Also, the angle of the lands may be less stressful to the bullet jacket, so thin-jacketed match bullets would be less likely to come apart at the high spin rates longer bullets require. It is also felt to be easier to clean as there are no tight corners next to the lands to hold powder fouling.

The 5-groove type of rifling comes from the belief an odd number of grooves is also less stressful to the bullet because it doesn’t have two lands directly across from one another.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,837
Location
Michigan
Regular cut barrel is 6 groove so what you would need to do is have a 5R barrel of exact same dimensions to compare identical load performance. I just like knowing my bullet is not being compressed immediately opposite forces.
 

milo-2

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2011
Messages
1,207
Location
Gillette, Wy
General definition:
5R is a 5-groove rifling pattern with sloped or angled sides to the lands. All rifling has a certain amount of angle to the sides of the lands as a natural effect of the rifling process. The sides of the grooves are parallel, but the sides of the lands are not and the 5R carries this to an extreme.

So why should this be good? It is felt the 5R may seal off the bullet better. Also, the angle of the lands may be less stressful to the bullet jacket, so thin-jacketed match bullets would be less likely to come apart at the high spin rates longer bullets require. It is also felt to be easier to clean as there are no tight corners next to the lands to hold powder fouling.

The 5-groove type of rifling comes from the belief an odd number of grooves is also less stressful to the bullet because it doesn’t have two lands directly across from one another.
Regular cut barrel is 6 groove so what you would need to do is have a 5R barrel of exact same dimensions to compare identical load performance. I just like knowing my bullet is not being compressed immediately opposite forces.
Interesting, I have only shot 1 5R barrel, nothing stood out IMO, other than I do not recall a break in. Barrel did not speed up up, ever, but the same occurred with a 3 groove Mullerworks 6.5 barrel.
I don't think I have ever owned a 6 groove barrel either, most have been 4 groove. All cut.
 

L.Sherm

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2017
Messages
3,740
I seriously doudt majority of shooters would know if a barrel was a 3, 4, 5 or 6 groove barrel in the way it shot or broke in if you didn't tell them or they looked.
The quality of the steel, machining and finish is 99% of how good the barrel is cut or button.
 

David Urasky

Active Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
40
Location
Saratoga, WY
People tend to look at 5R profiles as being superior rifling. The benefit to using a 5R profile is easier cleaning. With the tapered edges of the rifling crap doesn't get stuck in a sharp corner as on a traditional squared edge rifling. As far as performance is concerned, there's no real benefit. I use them for my competition rifle where I'm shooting a couple of thousand rounds a year. My hunting guns getting maybe 50 rounds per year have traditional rifling unless I happen to have a 5R on the shelf.

Talk to the barrel manufacturer. Shuch as for my 20Tactical, Bartlien recomended a 4 groove traditional rifiling barrel. But I don't even know if 5R is available in 20 caliber.
 

Primary

LRH Assistant
Here are some related products that LRH members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to LRH’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to LRH discussions about these products.

 
 

Recent Posts

Top