Ruger #1

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by 220yotekiller, Oct 14, 2017.

  1. 220yotekiller

    220yotekiller Member

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    Hey guys, i'm new to the forum and I had a few questians for some of you more experenced shooters. I bought a Ruger #1 chambered in 7x57 Mauser and I'm having some trouble working up a load for it. I just loaded up some 160 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claws and the first batch shot .46" at 100 yards, so I loaded up 2 more batches of 3 and things really went down hill. the second batch shot 1.3" inches and the third batch shot 2.5".
    I had loaded up some 140 grain Accubonds and it was averaging 1.1" .
    Is this average accuraccy for Ruger #1s? I'm not into super long range but I do want to be able to be confident out to about 400 yards.
     
  2. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Some real shooters, some real clinkers, some average.

    Yours sounds average. I had one that was outstanding with nothing done.

    My current #1 is average. The trigger sucks as is, the fore end needs some help, going to try the Hicks Harmonizer this time around. The #1A light sporter-is-well it's light. It's a difficult style for me to get a good cheek weld with, and I'm certain I'm a bit of the inconsistency.

    Which variant are you working with?
     
  3. 220yotekiller

    220yotekiller Member

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    I'm shooting an 1A sporter. I was hoping that I could close the 1" gap but for hunting elk I guess it will be ok. my average shot is about 250 yards, but I just want the confidence that if i have to I can shoot 400, if I already have a hit animal.
     
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  4. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    I think you can get under the MOA mark, but maybe not by elk season.

    I think you're good enough for elk to 400 with what you got. Your average for the 3 groups is like 1.42". Your 0.46" is as likely to be best, as the 2.5" is worst. The 1.3" is likely about where you're at. Can be improved probably.

    I've been putting in time with mine lately, and think your 2.5" group is likely something in technique. I've done this more than once lately. For me establishing consistent cheek weld with this style stock has been problematic.

    The round, skinny, thin fore end doesn't ride the front rest as well as other styles, and can be sensitive to where exactly the stock is positioned initially.

    It's been a long while since I shot Trophy Bonded's. Good game bullets yes, most accurate maybe not. Your stated range limits open up a lot of possibilities.

    There are other good bullets out there, but I'd hunt with either of the 2 loads described so far, and play with it more in the off season.
     
  5. 220yotekiller

    220yotekiller Member

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    Ok so a new development, I pulled the forend off the rifle and I found that the guy that had it before me had installed a Hicks accurizer on it. I have no idea how these things work so what should I do?
     
  6. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Should be a set screw you can use to adjust the tension on the barrel. Generally set it to light contact, and add tension until you find the spot that meets your needs. Groups will likely open as you go past a certain point.

    It could be load specific.
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    NO 1's can be temperamental. If you google "accurizing a Ruger No. 1" I think you will find some help.

    I had several in .220 swift and one in 25-06 and all four of them would shoot MOA or better even with factory ammo until I shot them out so there's definitely hope.
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    By the way, you may want to give it a really good cleaning and start over after burning a couple of "foulers". Since it appears you bought it used there's no telling what kind of shape the previous owner left the bore in.
     
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  9. 220yotekiller

    220yotekiller Member

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    Thank you I was planning on cleaning it. By the way how many shots do you shoot before you clean the barrel? On my 220 Swift I am trying every 35 or 40 rounds. Th last time I let it get to 50 without a cleaning I had bits of copper in the barrel. been trying to clean more often since then
     
  10. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the rifle. Anytime I notice groups opening up or cold bore shots getting a little squirrely clean them. Some of them won't get cleaned more than once a year if that, some need it more often. It all depends on the quality of the barrel.

    The faster they run, as a rule, the fewer rounds it takes. Friction makes heat and heat increases copper fouling.

    As a rule unless I'm prarie dog hunting and going through a whole lot of rounds in a hurry I prefer the foaming bore cleaners and will use them overnight until they run clean.
     
  11. waltercrouse

    waltercrouse Well-Known Member

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    I load for 7x57 and found that you have measure cases for the proper length . I have that some of the cases are shorter than the stated length. Resized 6MM rem cases do not work. I reject the short cases and get good results.
     
  12. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    I have a No 1 in 7 rem mag that took some time to sort out. I was getting no joy with Nosler BTs and Accubonds, so I installed a Hicks unit and found little improvement. I was going to have the crown recut (grasping at straws by then) but the gunsmith suggested I try some other bullets before he would fire up the lathe. Berger 168s were so-so, but when I fired my first batch of 180s she was a whole new beast. Removed all pressure from the hicks and played with charge weight using a ladder test and now enjoy half MOA. Don't give up, the falling block is too beautiful to be a safe queen.
     
  13. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Well-Known Member

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    One thing I always do is to make sure the fore end is not resting directly on a hard surface such as a sand bag. I always carry a folded up towel to place between the fore end and any front rest. This dampens the spring like effect of the cantilever fore end. Additionally be careful of how you hold the rifle when shooting from a rest so that you do not preload the fore end.
     
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  14. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Well-Known Member

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    An old trick that works as well as the Hicks, is to find a paper 12 gauge shotgun shell and cut off about an inch of the paper. Split and trim the paper and put it in the very end of the fore end barrel channel. Go the the range with your folded towel and slowly tighten the fore end screw half a turn for each three shot group. You should find a minimum. I have used other materials but nothing ever worked quite as well as that paper shot gun shell tube.
     
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