Recoil Reducer

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by JAnderson94, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. JAnderson94

    JAnderson94 Member

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    Hey guys,

    I have the cabelas model savage 110 t .308 cal, pretty much its a 24in bull barrel model 10 with the accustock. I have a leoupold 4-12x44 on top of it but with my plastic stock its VERY front heavy to say the least. It gets worse with the addition of my bipod. I saw mercury recoil reducers and was wonder if any one on here has had experience with them?

    Thanks,
    James
     
  2. idaho elk hunter

    idaho elk hunter Well-Known Member

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    I have used many of them on customers rifles that have heavy recoil. really heavy recoil, such as the big Weatherbys. They show no improvement, none, zilch, nada! you will feel very little improvement on small, low recoiling calibers such as the 243 class rifles. I contribute this to the weight more than moving fluid.
    100 lbs of recoil traveling at a average of 12 mph vs 2.5 lbs of static fluid? no improvement.
    Then take 13 lbs of recoil and 2.5 lbs of static fluid.. Little improvement.
     
  3. jfseaman

    jfseaman Well-Known Member

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    I just got back from the range. Testing 300 Weatherby loads and making big bang after a hard week.

    Same starting book load on new brass for both rifles.

    Rifle #1 11lb or more of full custom big Hall action, Krieger #6 barrel. What recoil, there's no recoil.
    Rifle #2 7lb 1987 Weatherby Mark V Fibermark 7lb ish. Ouch, ouch, ouch.

    I think real weight, in the action and barrel, not in the stock is where the benefit is. Weight in the stock is fighting with the recoil, causing flexing in stock and action.

    Oh yeah both rifles liked this load.


    The Hall will someday become a 375, maybe a MJOLNIR. The light weight Weatherby, well it needs to become something else.
     
  4. Dgd6mm

    Dgd6mm Well-Known Member

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    From what I read I'll take it that a muzzle brake is out of the question because of being front heavy. I'd pull the bull barrel and replace it with a light varmint or heavy sporter. You could sell that barrel and buy one and should be able to break about even. Love those Savage Barrel Nutted Rifles!!!

    P.S. I've heard that the recoil reducer is not the way to go, this is from those that have had them. I almost went that route in one of my Target Rifles.


    Don Dunlap
     
  5. Axtell3

    Axtell3 Well-Known Member

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    Put a heavier stock on it. It will shoot better too.
     
  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1

    In our testing there is little difference in the effect they produce. In fact the same amount/weight
    of Lead will do about the same.

    Also as Axtell said a laminate stock will make a huge difference in balance .

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. Harvman

    Harvman Well-Known Member

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    I have two rifles with recoil reducers in them along with one shotgun and I can't speak high enough about them. No offense to the others that posted otherwise.

    I do think that the previous posts do merit looking at, as I also think that they are correct. Meaning, that a different stock will make a ton of difference, a muzzle break (which I have one on one of those recoil reducer rifles above) will do the trick also.

    In my opinion this is how I look at the difference:
    Muzzle breaks = reduce the movement backwards = reduce felt recoil
    draw backs is some ranges don't allow/ like - some muzzle breaks punish your spotter or near by shooters or blow up dirt (I recommend the CSR muscle break - search Ryan Pierce). I have heard people associate muzzle breaks with damaging cheaper optics (the air gun scope theory)??? I have not experienced this.

    Recoil reducers = reducers of SHARP kicking recoil = to me, they take out those sharp hits by slowing the physics of recoil. Example is that I have two shotguns (exactly the same) and as we come out of Wisconsin winter wonderland and start shooting more clays... I can shoot hundreds of rounds thru the one with its recoil reducer and fine the next day. The other makes my arm look like it mouthed off to a MMA master fighter! Down sides is that it adds weight to the heel of the gun. I use the big ones, I think 5" from brownells.

    Different stocks = Bettter accuracy, weight distribution, reduction in felt recoil. I think this is the starting place for your quest... with a GOOD stock. Note: the Good and not the cheap, light weight.

    If I have a medium caliber (06- 300) I would say stock, recoil reducer then muzzle break. Now let me throw this disclaimer that if it is a light weight rifle.... do all if weight doesn't matter if it does then stock and muzzle break for sure!

    Larger calibers... hard hitter in recoil... stock, muzzle break... then recoil reducer only for slowing the hard snapping punch.

    Now for those looking at this with the giant recoiling rifles... well that's like saying minus 20 below is cold but -40 is really cold during the winter in North Dakota. To me they are both super fricking cold! If you have a giant Weatherby (I use too) it better weigh a ton or expect your teeth to rattle a little!
     
  8. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    Ounce for ounce, dollar for dollar, nothing reduces recoil better than a muzzle brake.
     
  9. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    I get the largest grind to fit Limbsaver recoil pad and then I do not grind it.
    LIMBSAVERâ„¢ GRIND-TO-FIT PADS | Brownells

    Skin feels pain at ~ 20 psi. Leaving the pad unground leaves more area, and keeps the highest pressure point on the shoulder below 20 psi during recoil.

    I cover the reveal with a cheek rest ammo bag.
    I have done this for ~ a dozen belted magnum rifles.
    It makes the 338 Win mag kick feel like a 257 Roberts.
     
  10. andrewb1369

    andrewb1369 Member

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  11. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    An auto scoping mechanism. Last thing I would want is my stock length of pull getting shorter on a hard kicker. Probably work great on a shotgun but would have to be carefully thought out before putting something like this on a scoped rifle.
     
  12. andrewb1369

    andrewb1369 Member

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    That's what I was thinking but I'm curious to see someone use one or if anybody has had any luck with them. In the video of their website they shoot a 375 H&H Magnum and it reduced it to about a 30-06
     
  13. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    JA, Boyd's and Stocky's have laminate replacement stocks for the Accustock if you choose to go that way. Good luck
     
  14. Clark

    Clark Well-Known Member

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    My two stock positions seem to be: 1) 50 yard shots out the vehicle window, which favors a short stock, and 2) 400 yards shots prone with a bi pod and rear bag while lying in the roadway next to the vehicle, favoring a long 15" stock pull.