Prone Shooting Position

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Prone Shooting Position

Prone Shooting Position
By Jim See

Prone shooting from the bipod should be our most accurate and precise position, yet some of us suffer in this area. I still see the biggest mistakes in this position at rifle matches from some well rounded and experienced shooters. Most of these issues can be easily fixed by the individual with a little forethought and awareness in their practice.

First I’m going to start with the conventional prone position...

Read more about this article here...
 

thomasbangs

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Jun 22, 2012
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Post Falls, Idaho
I do not have a lot of experience shooting prone from a bipod, but I have a lot of experience shooting prone from a tight sling and or from shooting prone with a rest. Prone should be the most accurate position and my preferred shooting position for any situation. If I have a choice, I would rather shoot prone than any other position.
 

Timnterra

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I appreciate the article, I shoot with s lot of different folks and am constantly trying to get others involved in shooting and hunting. One thing I have noticed is that lots of guys are not interested in taking instruction. It is wonderful to take a first time shooter to the range and start them off with good form and good habits. It is funny how a first time shooter can out shoot a lot of “experienced” shooters after one afternoon of instruction simply because they have enough humility to listen and follow proper fundamentals. What really surprises me is the number of service men that I’ve shot with who have no earthly idea what they are doing with a rifle.
 

Timnterra

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What is a good rear bag that can be used in the field while hunting?
Len has one in the long range hunting store. There are a bunch of options out there. I like the bags that have three different dimensions like 3”x4”x5”. This makes for the most versatile support. I have made a couple of my own and used other people’s stuff. The one I like best is one that I made that is 3x4x5 and filled with air soft BB’s. It is light enough to carry around, is filled with plastic so doesn’t matter if it gets wet, and has MOLLE strapping running around the edge so that I can sinch it up with a bunge if I want it tighter.
 

thomasbangs

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Jun 22, 2012
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Post Falls, Idaho
What is a good rear bag that can be used in the field while hunting?
A lot of the bags that are on the market are great for shooting from a bench or for "F" matches laying prone where they don't have to be packed in the woods or mountains on steep ground. If you are hunting big game like elk, deer, bear, or moose you would most certainly be wearing a pack of some sort with meat sacks in it. I carry 2 meat sacks rolled up in a separate bag with a draw string, this makes a nice rear bag and the pack makes a front bag for laying prone on long shots.
 

carl1775

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KS
I guess I've never considered taking bags out to hunt. While in the prone position, I use either my left fist, or the back of my left hand/wrist (right handed shooter). Most of my shooting has occurred sitting on the ground/ out of a stand or off-hand. I've only thought of using those supports during bench shooting.
 

Timnterra

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I guess I've never considered taking bags out to hunt. While in the prone position, I use either my left fist, or the back of my left hand/wrist (right handed shooter). Most of my shooting has occurred sitting on the ground/ out of a stand or off-hand. I've only thought of using those supports during bench shooting.

I was the same way, until I started looking seriously at taking long shots at game. I am way more stable with a shooting bag than my fist under the rear of the rifle.
 

Timnterra

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Here are a couple pics of the bag I use.
 

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J E Custom

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What I found shooting prone was to pick a comfortable position without looking at the target. once you have what feels to be the best position, look down/through the site without moving and see where you are. and make the necessary adjustments so that when you close your eyes and then open them you are on target.

I tried shooting with my body directly in line with the target and it was not natural for me so I moved my feet around until I was lined up with the target and the rifle sites. Once I learned where to place my body I could shoot rapid fire events and after each shot the rifle recovered and returned to this position every time.

Like many things there is no "ONE" position for everybody, and you must find out what is best for you. That's why I Recommend that everyone find the most natural position to shoot from and practice in that position and with any aid like a rear bag if they intend to hunt with one. I personally don't use a rear bag when hunting because unless you have the time to set up every time it does you no good. So practice with all the equipment the way you intend to hunt.

If you have a good position, every time you close your eyes for a minute and relax, Then open your eyes, you are still on target.

Just a recommendation from an 'OLD' prone shooter.

J E CUSTOM
 

thomasbangs

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Jun 22, 2012
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Post Falls, Idaho
Prone shooting should be a riflemans most accurate shooting position short of shooting from the bench. I was taught to shoot prone from a tight sling with laying at a 45 degree angle, toes out, and heels down. This worked fine while shooting smallbore and I had no problems and could shoot very well, however when I started shooting high power with the M-1 Garand my prone scores cost me some matches, especially prone rapid. The recoil from a 30-06 would move my right elbow and I was constantly readjusting to get back on target. This is not conducive to good scores. At that time a older gentleman who had shot for the military and was a veteran Camp Perry shooter was watching me shoot in a John Garand Match. He observed how I was laying and after the match he showed me how to keep my entire body inline with the rifle (stock) and let my entire body absorb the recoil instead of just my right shoulder. My scores in both rapid prone and prone slow fire went up not only with the Garand but with the AR-15 in service rifle competition. This being said I do believe in field situations and hunting conditions a person has to experiment, find a comfortable position and find out the best position for him or her.
 

ShtrRdy

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High Plains
thomasbangs -- could you include a picture of your position that you described? I'm having trouble understanding how you would get your support hand/arm under the rifle.
 

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