Primers won't fit

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by elk wallow, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. elk wallow

    elk wallow Member

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    Using Fed. 210 primers and once fired hornady brass from factory superformace ammo. I got a few too fit but had to use way too much force. I've never reloaded brass from superformance ammo before. Are the primer pockets smaller? The primers went into Rem brass just fine.
    Thanks
     
  2. pushcoguy

    pushcoguy Active Member

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    What caliber?
     
  3. elk wallow

    elk wallow Member

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    308 win
     
  4. pushcoguy

    pushcoguy Active Member

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    Are you familiar with the term "Military Crimp"? The first time I loaded for .308, I had the same problem. I bought a tool to remove the crimp, and have been getting along fine since.
     
  5. tailbon3

    tailbon3 Well-Known Member

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    You might have to buy a primer pocket uniformer tool. Lyman makes a decent one. I've found that lots of unfired brass have primer pockets that are too shallow and I have to 'uniform' (make the pocket deeper) with the uniformer tool. Then the primers fit like they should.
     
  6. pushcoguy

    pushcoguy Active Member

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    I believe that the tool you are talking about is the same one that I use to remove military crimps.... soooo, two birds.
     
  7. elk wallow

    elk wallow Member

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    The primer pocket seems deep enough. The primers I did get in were deep enough. The pocket seems too small in diameter. I crushed one primer trying to seat it. Also the mouth of the pocket is not smooth by any means. There is a slight "step"
     
  8. njshooter

    njshooter Active Member

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    I had the same problem with hornady American whitetail ammo in 308
     
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  9. Georgiashooter

    Georgiashooter Well-Known Member

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    Get a primer pocket military crimp remover. Dillon makes a machine for $100 or get a Lyman for @$15.
     
  10. elk wallow

    elk wallow Member

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    Thanks!
     
  11. elk wallow

    elk wallow Member

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    Is it called a primer pocket reamer?
     
  12. Georgiashooter

    Georgiashooter Well-Known Member

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    Yes that is correct. Been so long I forgot the name of it. I bought the Dillon swager, nice tool but overkill. I also have an old Lyman reamer with the wooden handle and its quicker than the swager and you can do mixed headstamp brass without worry.
     
  13. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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  14. DUSTY NOGGIN

    DUSTY NOGGIN Well-Known Member

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    https://www.dillonprecision.com/super-swage-600_8_8_25263.html

    i did the drill thing , i tried an on the press gadget , but the dillon super swager 600 is the best so far & was twice as fast as any other method i have tried. (5k in a day ) Plus, you can NOT cut away too much material like a counter sink or a reamer making pocket too loose/ruining brass

    you can use a dillon 600 as a sorter in large batches of mixed brass. Because you can feel the difference in the press between commercial and nato

    there is a difference in some of the brass that you will notice ( commercial & nato ) , which is the thickness of the material where the primer hole goes through ( although i havent done any water test between the two) - i still sort as if they had different case capacities ... you will see what i mean when you are adjusting internal stop rod you may have to go through alot of cases and find the perfect adjustment to work best for all possible case types ... in the end , you will think 100 bucks was a great value

    And wait theres MORE !!! doesnt need power to operate , an important feature if the power ever goes out
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2017