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Precision Scope Mounting For The Working Rifle

By Jim See of Elite Accuracy - - Everybody seems to be an expert when it comes to putting stuff together but a novice when it comes to diagnosing...
By ADMIN · Jan 31, 2019 ·
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4.83333/5,
  1. Jim See

    Jim See Well-Known Member

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    Jul 2, 2013
    JB kwik weld. It sets in 20 minutes and creates a surface that hangs on to the scope, it will not slip in it.
     
    ncwg2boatguy likes this.
  2. Jim See

    Jim See Well-Known Member

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    Jul 2, 2013
    I never tried that and find just thhe opposite with JB kwik weld.
     
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  3. parshal

    parshal Well-Known Member

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    Apr 29, 2002
    It's definitely a gasket! LOL
     
  4. Huggy

    Huggy Well-Known Member

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    Apr 15, 2017
    Some folks state that buying a "quality" set of "perfectly machined rings" will ensure that bedding isn't necessary.
    While I have yet to try the bedding of rings to scope, I'll certainly give it a go PDQ.
    As for "perfectly machined rings," ain't no such animals.
    Close, maybe. REALLY close, I don't doubt it.
    But "Perfectly?" Nope.
    I've bought some of the most expensive machined rings over the years and, being a skeptic, I lapped them anyway.
    Guess what?
    Lapping showed there was STILL some inconsistencies in the machining alignment. Had I used them as-is out of the container my scope body(ies) would have suffered for it. Even if only a small amount. Not something you expect when buying high-end, allegedly "perfect" rings, right?
    And while I don't own the most expensive rifle scopes on the planet, I'm not about to let any of my Nightforce or expensive (to me) Leupold scopes be crunched or cause undue stress upon the internal mechanisms of them, either.
    That said, YMMV and you gotta do what you gotta do and You do YOU, Boo-Boo.
    I'm going to give this a go in the not-too-distant future and see what happens.
    Overnout
     
  5. LDHunter

    LDHunter Well-Known Member

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    Jun 21, 2001
    I'm sure that Jim See's method is way more scientific than what I do and likely introduces way less stress on scopes but I simply don't have that much time or ability to do it his way. That's why I've used Burris Signature rings with the plastic inserts for a long time on all my rifles. I know it's likely nowhere near the precision his system introduces but once again I don't have the time or ability to use his system plus there is NEVER the slightest hint of a ring mark on the scope mounted my way should I decide to sell or trade the scope.

    I'll share one experience I had back when I used to lap rings. I was about to lap rings and couldn't find my lapping rod so a buddy brought his over. Guess what? When we finished and were about to mount my scope we found my lapping rod and decided to touch up the lapping job with my rod. VOILA!!! It gave us lapping wear in different places on the rings. We deduced that the issue was the one or both of the lapping rods were either worn or not straight and both were nearly new.

    Another issue. I'm always buying and selling rifles and scopes and rings and bases and will NEVER use anyone else's base, rings, etc.... They are usually messed up by someone that doesn't know what they're doing... Like me I guess... LOL

    I HAVE had a couple of my bases bedded by my gunsmith(s) on actions of factory rifles and felt it helped when inconsistencies appeared that couldn't be explained and it helped.

    Note also that unless you're using custom actions it seems that scope base mounting holes must not be even nearly aligned parallel to the center of the bore so I have found that the ability of the Burris Signature rings to properly center the scope to the bore before final sighting in is very useful in keeping the reticle operating in the center of it's adjustment range. When I buy used scopes I've found that they're almost always way off to one side or another in the horizontal adjustment range presumably because of being mounted on rifles where the base alignment holes aren't parallel to the bore of their rifles.

    By the way... Thanks to Jim See for an excellent article and I'd likely have my gunsmith mount my scopes that way if I ever settled on one scope for one rifle with the same mounting hardware and if I wanted to pursue supreme accuracy.
     
  6. robert l

    robert l Well-Known Member

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    Feb 28, 2016
  7. LDHunter

    LDHunter Well-Known Member

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    No... You want to move those rings FORWARD and then torque them because the rifle moves forcefully backward during recoil and the scope through inertia tries not to move with the rifle therefore it ends up sliding forward if not locked down securely.

    Inertia def: PHYSICS: a property of matter by which it continues in its existing state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, unless that state is changed by an external force.
     
  8. robert l

    robert l Well-Known Member

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    Feb 28, 2016
    ooops your right thank you
     
  9. robert l

    robert l Well-Known Member

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    Feb 28, 2016
    It seems to me that we pay well over a hun for these rails that they could be of better design. Like the gap that the ring sits in could be alot tighter.