Long range 2 way Radios/Walkie Talkies ?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Wedgy, Sep 19, 2018.

  1. Wedgy

    Wedgy Well-Known Member

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    I've been looking in to getting a pair for various purposes and are some of the favorites. The Midland brand seems to be fairly popular at Cabela's/Walmart/Bass Pro but a guide friend said he had some and they were terrible. He now uses the Baofeng BF-F8HP which are a bit more expensive, but he really loves them.
    Any recommendations ?

    https://baofengtech.com/bf-f8hp
     
  2. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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    Have used the Garmin Rinos for years. Nothing like a GPS and radio in one package and ability to track and find a down buddy is priceless. They are max 5 watt though.
     
  3. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    Tagging in
    I’m looking into getting a HAM certification.
     
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  4. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    W, the 8 watts on the unit in the link sounds appealing. I've seen so many brands and gimmicks featuring 10, 15 even 20 mile ranges. If ANYTHING is between the two units you're not getting through. Would be nice to try out several befor purchasing or buy with a return satisfaction guarantee. Would like to find something that worked in the hilly terrain. Good luck
     
  5. Heavyiron

    Heavyiron Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Hams do have more flexibilty. For instance 2 meters if there is a repeater tower your talk can extend for miles. The baefong handhelds are abreak thru for hams. You can get them for about 50% less than yaesu, icom, kenwood etc. Hams have the flexibilty of 1500 watts, but you will get typically in a handheld between 5 and 10 watts. I carry a hand held antenna with me (option) and can talk to other hams on a repeater 30 miles. Ham fun is unlimited. Cheers n4alr feel free to look up my call sign on google
     
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  6. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member

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    Will do, I just downloaded a app that has all the questions. I’m going to study and take the test.
     
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  7. Heavyiron

    Heavyiron Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    Talk on a base antenna with friends having handhelds can lead into several miles away. Before cell phones i could hunt 4 miles away and talk to my spouse at home.
    Cheers n4alr
     
  8. 1Moose

    1Moose Well-Known Member

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    Tagging in. I’ve been using the Garmin Rinos the past few years, but even at 5w we struggle to send and receive at even less than a mile (as the crow flies) given the mountain terrain. If there was something better / affordable, I’d be interested. Also wish the Garmins were rechargeable from a battery brick, which they aren’t. Seriously annoying to have to buy their extra LiIon battery pack. The pack that accepts replaceable batteries doesn’t work on 5w, so there are some downsides to the rinos, IMO.
     
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  9. Heavyiron

    Heavyiron Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    The limiting factor on the way the family service handhelds are, the antenna is limited to short range communications. Manufacterers have to build them that wayto please the fcc.
    Amateur handhelds are unlimited to what you can do. You can attach a temporary antenna and talk long distance.
    I built my own antenna for longer ranges. It looks just the ones that scientists use when you see them in the outdoors tracking animals with radio send type collars.
     
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  10. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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    Agree with all of it.
     
  11. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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    For serious communications I have been looking at satellite phones. Almost got an
    Inmarsat, but the satellites are all along the equator and just above the 45th parallel (where I am) the satellites would be about 30 degrees. So.... they might not work if you are on the north face of a steep mountain, or in a canyon. Iridium, has better coverage, but is more expensive.
    Global Star has serious financial issues and may not last....

    https://www.amazon.com/Inmarsat-Isa...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PP2ERNN60CJ7C7KRT19R

    https://www.amazon.com/Iridium-9555-Satellite-Kit-Packaging/dp/B00IJHGSIO
     
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  12. alcesgigas

    alcesgigas Well-Known Member

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    Here in the Arctic Iridium satellite using phone/radio/trackers are the only ones that work most of the time. However, the Iridium 9575 might just as well cost that much--then there's the weekly/monthly/annual "subscription." "Ya jus' neva' stop payin'." But then--now--there's the "Spot" and "InReach" gizmos that text and email (not audio) that some are bringing in; so far they've been quite effective I'm told.
     
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  13. Excavator

    Excavator Well-Known Member

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    We have been using vhf marine radios for years. I know you are only suppose to use them on the water. However where we use them there is water everywhere. My boots stay wet!
     
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  14. Excavator

    Excavator Well-Known Member

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    They are about $100 work for a long ways and have a weather channel