Long range 2 way Radios/Walkie Talkies ?

Wedgy

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Feb 9, 2013
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The limiting factor on the way the family service handhelds are, the antenna is limited to short range communications. Manufacterers have to build them that wayto please the fcc.
Amateur handhelds are unlimited to what you can do. You can attach a temporary antenna and talk long distance.
I built my own antenna for longer ranges. It looks just the ones that scientists use when you see them in the outdoors tracking animals with radio send type collars.
My buddy with the Baofeng BF-F8HP said to get the special antenna, ~$6 on Ebay
s-l1600.jpg
 

Barrelnut

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End of the Oregon Trail
User Guide says that it is illegal to use the radios on FRS and GMRS in the USA. Probably because of the 8 watts That might limit ability to talk to the average Joe, who will more than likely have FRS or GMRS in the field.
 

TheHardWay

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Hesperus, CO
My buddy with the Baofeng BF-F8HP said to get the special antenna, ~$6 on EbayView attachment 105873
FWIW I use this setup at King of the Hammers (165 mile Ultra 4 desert/rockcrawling race in the middle of nowhere in the mojave desert. Look it up, its cool!!) I am able to communicate from the remote pits to the main pit and the race car on the course, which is several miles with mountains in between.
 

Wedgy

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FWIW I use this setup at King of the Hammers (165 mile Ultra 4 desert/rockcrawling race in the middle of nowhere in the mojave desert. Look it up, its cool!!) I am able to communicate from the remote pits to the main pit and the race car on the course, which is several miles with mountains in between.
I saw a show about King of the Hammers...those rigs can navigate some insane terrain and obstacles ! thanks for the feedback, it's really narrowing the field.
 

corsair4360

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Northern Utah
The big challenge for most walkie talkie two way radios is the frequency band you use is a very high frequency and is basically line of sight. In general radios are line of sight unless they have lots of power and can "bounce" off parts off the atmosphere or terrain. The higher the frequency, the more line of sight they are. Even the old FM band Forest Service radios I used in the early '70's were limited to line of sight (antenna 7 feet long on a pickup) and repeaters were necessary to make them useful.
 

Heavyiron

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Danielsville georgia
The big challenge for most walkie talkie two way radios is the frequency band you use is a very high frequency and is basically line of sight. In general radios are line of sight unless they have lots of power and can "bounce" off parts off the atmosphere or terrain. The higher the frequency, the more line of sight they are. Even the old FM band Forest Service radios I used in the early '70's were limited to line of sight (antenna 7 feet long on a pickup) and repeaters were necessary to make them useful.
Yes you are correct. The only way to talk any distance is with a base or repeator and that is where ham radio comes in.
 

Heavyiron

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Ham clubs have repeater antennas on some of the tallest mountain tops in the west. One in colorado covers 5 states. They are free to use but you must have at least a technician license. We have one on mt mitchell in north carolina that covers part of 6 states. This could be of value to a hunter that hunts alone and could talk home. No cell service, no problem. If you and your partner both get hurt you can get help.
Alaska has one thru linked repeaters that covers about 1/3 of alaska. Law enforcement moniters it and respond to emergencies on 5.167.5
 
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corsair4360

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Feb 2, 2013
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Northern Utah
Ham clubs have repeater antennas on some of the tallest mountain tops in the west. One in colorado covers 5 states. They are free to use but you must have at least a technician license. We have one on mt mitchell in north carolina that covers part of 6 states. This could be of value to a hunter that hunts alone and could talk home. No cell service, no problem. If you and your partner both get hurt you can get help.
Alaska has one thru linked repeaters that covers about 1/3 of alaska. Law enforcement moniters it and respond to emergencies on 5.167.5
Great service I had no idea existed, however, all radio signals in mountainous terrain have no coverage areas.... due to "terrain shadows" where the radio signal is not available.
 

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