Learning to shoot

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by CleanShot, May 15, 2015.

  1. CleanShot

    CleanShot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Hello

    For newbie shooters like myself, is there a way to learn without picking up bad habits?

    Thanks
    Sam
     
  2. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,910
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Professional instruction or a shooting coach.
    Reading or watching videos will give you good pointers but you need somebody to watch your form. If not then you could be starting out instilling bad habits.
     
  3. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,179
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    I've been shooting for 45 years, and this is the year I'm finally able to get some hands on instruction. Way over due.

    Some places have firearms available for use. It may save you money in the long run, by shaping your future purchases.
     
  4. CleanShot

    CleanShot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Where do you find a "good" instructor? I probably should have phrased my question that way in retrospect. I know no video will do it. But how do I find someone who actually knows what they are talking about?
     
  5. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,910
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    I'm sure there are shooting instructors/courses in Jersey, it's worth a google.:D
    Ask your gun shop, Police if you know any, Army or Army Guard if any of them know any Marksmen/Snipers. Go to some local matches, or maybe somebody on here in your area will chime in to help.
     
  6. Darkker

    Darkker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Just start shooting, a LOT. You don't need your mother looking over your shoulder to figure-out walking barefoot through a sewer isn't desirable. So start shooting and testing yourself, you will figure out what does and doesn't work. You need practice, not a rocket scientist.
     
  7. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,910
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    Darkker is right; waist enough time & money and eventually you will get it right.

    However I don't think the OP was asking about a long series of trial and error, I have the feeling he wants it done right the first time. I spent many years flinging lead down range figuring things out on my own, and yeah I learned quite a bit. However I would rather have spent all that time and thousands of rounds honing my skills instead of trying to figure them out.
     
  8. MOA Chaser

    MOA Chaser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    105
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    I'm having fun just learning as I go. If you take the time to read, watch a few videos, you will pick up the basics. After a few books that I picked up cheap on my Kindle I noticed that a lot of the stuff was repetitive. So I figured that if several "experts" all said the same thing then there must be something to it. Check mark on that!

    I handload as well, and if you really want to learn the "ins and outs" of your gun, start making ammo for it. :)

    I was thinking the other day about getting some expert instruction but then I figured what is the fun in that? Sort of like if you were a kid and you get a big box of presents for Christmas and before you get a chance to open it someone tells you exactly what is in it. Yea, it still might be fun, but the fun and surprise is gone.

    This afternoon I loaded up 9 rounds of ammo, went to the range, poured a nice glass of Cabernet, and watched the sunset as I dinged steel at 500 yards with a load I'm working up. It just don't get any better than that. :D
     
  9. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2012
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
  10. CleanShot

    CleanShot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2013
    Sounds like there is nothing like putting some rounds through the barrel. I'll take that approach.
     
  11. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,910
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2007
    You don't necessarily have to enroll in a class somewhere to get help. That's why I mentioned the LE, Mil and such. Most shooters I know are more than willing to help somebody. I know the military marksmanship teams travel around and put on clinics, because I've done it. Even if it's just one good shooting session you could be leaps and bounds ahead of other new shooters. I get what others are saying about the whole "nothing like putting rounds down range" thing, and I agree to a point. However, why wouldn't you want to start off on the right foot? No matter how good you get or how much you think you know, you can always learn and you should always strive to better yourself.
    Whatever you decide, good luck.
     
  12. Canadian Bushman

    Canadian Bushman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,674
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
  13. mtwarych

    mtwarych Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    282
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2013
    My only advice to the OP is to be disciplined enough that the OP does not take a shot that is improperly set up.

    One of the many reasons women tend to outshoot men is that most women will not muscle a shot, women will take the time to properly set up with good shooting form and good alignment where as a man has the tendency to muscle a rifle onto the target.

    Learn proper form in all positions, learn how to properly align yourself and your rifle to your target and adjust your form and target alignment until everything is perfect. Until everything is perfect, do not shoot.

    Good luck on your accurate shooting quest.
     
  14. JungleBoogey

    JungleBoogey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    I have to agree and I disagree. There is no substitute for good, qualified 'basic' training. Practice can only help you to improve on what you've already been properly taught. I started hunting a little late (as an adult) with my 1st real shooting lessons coming when I joined the Army. Before that I learned all the wrong techniques watching TV shows (like shooting a handgun sidewards) :D When I decided I wanted to learn to hunt, I joined a club and took courses (familiarization with differnt types of rifles and calibers, reloading, shooting at moving targets, trapping, tracking, trap and skeet...the list goes on). Also important is learning to shoot from different positions (standing supported, unsupported, prone, kneeling). I chose the training that interested me and actually 'tested out' and received certification. I then bought videos or 'youtubed' to reinforce my newly gained knowledge . I also joined forums like this one and asked lots of questions. Lot's of smart and experienced people on the www. I now help teach courses to American soldiers and civilians stationed in Germany who want to hunt. You'd be surprised how many people who hunted rabbits and squirrels back home couldn't hit the side of the barn when it came to wild boar, large deer or mountain goats. Don't waste ammo, it can be expensive especially in the larger calibers. I agree that practice makes perfect but only when you're practicing proper techniques. I still don't know didley in the BIG, BIG picture, I'm still learning but I do believe that "a little schoolin' sure ain't gonna hurt ya" gun)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2015