Idaho hunt

Talyn

Active Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2010
Messages
29
Location
Montana
How do they hold up to snow loads? How about 30+ mph wind gusts whipping under and around you?
#1 - They don't, and #2 - Strap yourself in for a wild ride.

They have their place in summer backpacking but IMO not well for a fall/winter hunting camp in the Rockies.

But maybe they're fine back east.

My .02
 

Rafter o

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2019
Messages
8
Location
Riverton Wyoming
It's big country check out maybe get some one to pack in your camp. I do it in Wyoming for some hunters. Make sure that you can start a fire in all conditions. Cold and wet is a bad situation in the making.
 

One Hole

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2015
Messages
186
Location
North Idaho
Unless it's really rough country that I don't want to hike far in the dark, I have evolved towards hiking back to a comfortable camp at the trail head each night. My 4" memory foam mattress in the back of my Expedition calls after a long hunt. If never met a sleeping pad or fartbag that compares! lol
 

Rafter o

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2019
Messages
8
Location
Riverton Wyoming
Unless it's really rough country that I don't want to hike far in the dark, I have evolved towards hiking back to a comfortable camp at the trail head each night. My 4" memory foam mattress in the back of my Expedition calls after a long hunt. If never met a sleeping pad or fartbag that compares! lol
 

wapitiaddict

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
81
Location
Idaho
#1 - They don't, and #2 - Strap yourself in for a wild ride.

They have their place in summer backpacking but IMO not well for a fall/winter hunting camp in the Rockies.

But maybe they're fine back east.

My .02
yeah, I knew that...just didn't want to let him down hard;)
 

Chap Pops

Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
13
Right now, a sports stadium is your friend. Find an empty sports stadium near you, and start running up and down the bleachers every day. When you can do that 15 times with relative ease, add a day pack with some sand bags or bottles or water. Keep challenging yourself. You will not believe how much elevation you will be climbing and descending when you get out west, and some or it will be in thin air (which you cannot duplicate at home).

Other recommendations are spot on: layers, lightness and Personal Locater Beacon. Good luck!
 

Chap Pops

Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
13
Also dont pass up the first one you may regret it you may go home to tag soup
I remember my first backpack hunt in Colorado. I was living in Virginia and was going with a brother and two friends who lived out there. I was worried about the elevation making a big difference, so I worked on my stamina by walking 5 miles every day and then adding some weight and jogging 5 miles. I did that all summer and when I got there I could keep up. Of course those guys worked desk jobs. Layered clothing is very important. You can be wearing everything that you have in the early morning or late evening and in the middle of the day be comfortable in shirt sleeves. Later I lived in Salmon Idaho and hunted that area. I was only out one night at a time and a tarp over me with a pad and down sleeping bag worked well. Wear and take enough to be comfortable and definitely be in the best shape you can be in but stamina so that you can handle the thin air is very important. Have a great trip and find time to sit and marvel at the country. It doesn't get any better.
 

stljc2

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
99
It's always been that way.

There is no handicapped waiver.

I carry a plastic skid when I'm in non-wilderness in order for me to either move the animal over snow better to get it out or drag some extra out besides what I have on my back.

In wilderness you either cut it up/bone it out and pack it out on your back or a horse if you have one.
Not that I'll ever get to try a hunt there...it's nice to know...THANKS Friend.
 

RAGGED EDGE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2012
Messages
122
Location
Yellowstone Country
I'm not too familiar with these. How do they hold up to snow loads? How about 30+ mph wind gusts whipping under and around you?

I was and adult leader for a scout backpacking trip last year. On June 21st it snowed four inches and dropped down to 20 degrees. One boy brought a hammock. Not sure what kind it was... Luckily some of the other boys had mercy on him and let him pile in with them.

I know a person that moved from Florida to Idaho falls, and he said the only times the wind blew as hard as it does here was when hurricanes were coming.
If he wanted to get out of the wind he could have moved to WYOMING.🤣
 

Starcraft88

New Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
3
Location
Ohio
I'm not too familiar with these. How do they hold up to snow loads? How about 30+ mph wind gusts whipping under and around you?

I was and adult leader for a scout backpacking trip last year. On June 21st it snowed four inches and dropped down to 20 degrees. One boy brought a hammock. Not sure what kind it was... Luckily some of the other boys had mercy on him and let him pile in with them.

I know a person that moved from Florida to Idaho falls, and he said the only times the wind blew as hard as it does here was when hurricanes were coming.
Ive been sleeping in hammock tents for years at 5-10 days at a time. Mainly up in Canada on remote fishing trips. Up there it’s so hard to find a clean spot big enough for a tent or level enough. The wind doesn’t really go through the tent.....it’s like any other tent. I keep my gear in dry bags under the tent and if the weathers real nasty I just string paracord above the hammock and run a tarp from peak to ground on wind side. Plus hammock tents can be setup on ground like a normal tent if desired. Buy a cheap one online for 60-$75 and try it out in backyard. You’ll be buying a good one in no time. Big advantages are they are small and light to carry. Very comfortable with no pad needed, and they don’t get wet from ground moisture and if they do get wet they dry fast because there hanging
 

DSheetz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
365
Yes the wind doesn't blow in Wyoming . But some of the other states around us suck the air from us so that we've had a lot of 40 - 50 plus gusts this winter .
 

mnoland30

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
188
I hunt in NM and CO, which are usually warmer than Idaho, but I have some advice. My hunting pack weighs 3 lbs. A pack frame is a waste of time. I even take the aluminum struts out of my internal frame pack. Get a video on how to bone out your animal, then you don't need the pack frame. Use a Thermarest z-pad to sleep on. Put it on top of pine duff, and it is enough. I have an open end silicone nylon tent that weighs 13 oz. Appy Trail tent on eBay has 4 sides and only weighs 20 oz. I can spend one night out and only add 7 lbs. to my pack. You'll probably need a heavier sleeping bag than I do. I use an 8 oz bivy rather than a ground cloth. It adds about 10 degrees to your bag. I recommend the Pocket Rocket stove, and MSR Kettle to cook in. I cut the bottom off a quart plastic bottle for a cup. Much lighter than most systems. If you expect really cold or wet weather, buy a Kifaru tent with a stove. Mine weighs in at 11 lbs. (sleeps 6) but when you're wet and cold, It is worth its weight in gold. I generally stay at base camp when the weather is bad. Definitely get used to your pack with weight before you go. It just makes the hunt more enjoyable. I also recommend Endurox R4. It restores you muscles and increases endurance. I drink some at lunch, and at the end of the day. Keeps your muscles from being sore. If you live at low altitude be aware of high altitude siickness. Spend a couple days at altitude before the hunt, and drink lots of water. I use a Sawyer water fllter, and have never had any problems. I use Platypus water bags (similar to Camelbacks but lighter). I rig two to gravity feed through the water filter. Get good light raingear. Also my A-Bolt Mt. Ti weighs 6.5 lbs with scope and sling. Give us an after hunt report. Good luck.i
 

mnoland30

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2010
Messages
188
When I got old, my wife started worrying about me hunting alone. I bought a Personal Locator Beacon. If you get in trouble, you open the antenna and push the button. It sends a signal to a satellite and NOAA relays your location to the nearest search and rescue team. It gives me a warm fuzzy feel when I'm miles from camp and wondering which way to go. It is small and light and you should have one in your pocket.

I use cotton balls soaked in vaseline for fire starters. Light, cheap, and effective. Always carry a compass. A map is nice when it's light, and a gps is great when it works, but in the dark, or fog, or when your batteries die, a compass will tell you which way is north. I got lost in the fog just the other day. My compass is about 1" in diameter and weighs next to nothing. I keep it in my pocket. I once went back in the dark for an elk shed a few hundred feet off the road. I got turned around and had no idea which way the road was. When I finally found the road, I didn't know which way the truck was. Keep survival essentials in your pockets. I hunt in Army BDU's just because of the colors and the pockets. I keep my neck warmer, glomitts, wool cap, and emergency kit (Bic lighter, fire starters, compass, Advil, whistle, mini flint/steel) and sunscreen in my pockets.
 
Last edited:

DSheetz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
365
I use 1 inch strips of old blue jeans rolled up and tied with thread soaked in candle wax for fire starters . They aren't messy kept in a zip lock bag also keep water resistant matches in a zip lock bag . If you carry the disposable gas lighters keep them in a pocket next to your body as at higher altitudes and colder temperatures they don't work when they get cold . unroll the denim a little to light it and it will burn long enough to start even damp twigs to get your fire started . Don't store these in a hot area
 

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