I got a Giraud Case Annealer, I have a few questions

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Clayne B, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. Clayne B

    Clayne B Well-Known Member

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    So I am annealing Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor brass.
    [​IMG]

    The 2 on the right have been annealed, The 2 on the left have not been
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    Here is a video I did with tempelac 750 in the inside of the neck, 425 on the out side of the case body

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygGipCnXstM]Test - YouTube[/ame]

    Tell me what you guys think, If im doing this wrong please tell me, and teach me the way of the ninja!
     
  2. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    Did you tumble them after annealing? I'm having a hard time seeing any color change on the annealed vs. non-annealed. When I anneal my Creedmoor brass I get a nice color change just below the shoulder that looks very similar to the anneal mark on new Lapua brass.
     
  3. Clayne B

    Clayne B Well-Known Member

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    brass was tumbled before annealing, The picture of the 4 brass next to each other, the 2 on the right are still warm, and had not been tumbled after annealing
     
  4. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    My opinion is that they didn't get hot enough because you should definitely see a color change below the shoulder. I have read that brass needs to reach 675° to begin annealing. I put a 650° temp mark about 1/8" below my shoulder and I apply heat until it melts. It takes between 6 and 7 seconds using my propane torch and my brass sizes noticeably easier and my groups have tightened up since I started using it.
     
  5. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    This is where I got my information about annealing. Whether it is right or wrong is a whole different matter but following the temperature recommendations in this article I've seen a difference in how well my loads shoot.

    24hourcampfire.com - "Annealing Cases" (Ken Howell)
     
  6. jsthntn247

    jsthntn247 Well-Known Member

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    Color doesn't mean squat. According to the tempilaq the necks are getting as hot as they need to be. Rock on with it your doing fine. I've had the same brass turn colors like new Lapua one annealing and then couldn't even see a mark on them the next. I believe case prep or lack there of before annealing has allot to do with it along with different materials the brass was made of.
     
  7. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    I supposed you're right with color not meaning anything. I've just always had my brass discolor when annealing and using the 650°F Tempilaq so I assumed maybe he needed just a little longer in the flame. Ultimately his groups and case life will tell him he's done it correctly or not.
     
  8. supercrossbmx69

    supercrossbmx69 Well-Known Member

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    +1 when I received my new Bertram brass it had VERY tight necks. So I had to anneal them 3 times till they finally loosened up to were I wanted them. The brass did not change color at all. The best way I can tell if it did anything or not is by running one piece through the dies or a mandrel (preferably) before and after you anneal. If they are noticibly easier to resize, then they are annealed. If they are just as hard as before you attempted to anneal them, you've done nothing.