Going on my first western elk hunt - will my treestand boot hold up?

Country Bumpkin

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Sep 22, 2015
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Boise, ID
Your math is correct, if you only get 3 seasons out of a $400 pair of boots, it's equivalent . . . if all other things are equal.

The fact is, all other things are not equal. If you hunt in steep terrain with varying weather (moisture & cold) conditions, that $400 pair will get you through 3 seasons of comfort, providing you with the necessary ankle support to pack heavy loads long distances, while keeping you warm and dry. The less-expensive boots will get you through a season, but nobody said you'd be comfortable or dry. In my opinion, a less expensive pair of boots is like buying a factory rifle. Sometimes you get a shooter, sometimes you get a headache, you don't know until you have already purchased and gotten it dirty.

Have no fear, the less expensive pair of boots will get you through your hunt, they won't fall off. They might leak (probably not a big concern where you will be hunting). They might give you blisters. They might tear a few seams. You will get a very good boot lesson through this hunt, assuming that you will be hunting rugged mountains for fair-chase and moderately pressured bulls. If it's a canned ranch hunt, you might come out of it wondering what all the boot fuss is about.
 

lazylabs

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I owe a lot to a pair of pronghorns... After they chewed all the skin off my feet the cost of Kenetreks was no longer a problem. I now have 2 pair one 400g the other non-insulated. They required no break in for me.
 

CleanShot

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I figured there would be externalities like comfort etc. I wasn't dismissing that so much as thinking if these boots get me through the hunt it's not throw away money. I honestly don't know much about the logistics of the hunt. It's a cow hunt I believe on both public and private land.
 

ohiohunter

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Oct 5, 2012
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I figured there would be externalities like comfort etc. I wasn't dismissing that so much as thinking if these boots get me through the hunt it's not throw away money. I honestly don't know much about the logistics of the hunt. It's a cow hunt I believe on both public and private land.

From the sounds of it you will be fine, but elk hunting is addicting and plan on chasing them again next year. There is a huge learning curve for your first hunt, even bigger when you're chasing bulls.. its always better to be over prepared (is there a such thing?) than under prepared in an unknown environment. If you're in the mtns you'll be taken back by how much the temperature fluctuates, and the toll of side hilling for a few days.

Good luck, tell the tale when you return... don't forget to critique your boots.
 

CleanShot

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Aug 6, 2013
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Bergen County, NJ
I thought I was over prepared but as with all new things you don't know what you don't know. I'm definitely looking at this as a lesson more than a hunt. If I don't harvest anything I wouldn't be upset at all as long as I come away with experience.
 

Laelkhunter

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New Orleans, La
Lots of good advice. I have found that Kennetrek boots don't fit me well, and the Danner Pronghorns do. I have several pairs of the Pronghorns, and rotate them on the hunt when/if one pair gets wet. I also hunt in Chama, and the Ranches I hunt result in lots of walking, with plenty of uphill and downhill stuff going on. I also have a pair of Muck boots, but they stay in Louisiana for my deer hunting. They do not belong on a Western hunt. Your feet would be hamburger after walking a few miles on uneven terrain in them.

I sent you a PM. Respond to it when you get a chance. Good luck in Chama !!
 

wackinandstackin243

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Dec 11, 2012
Messages
208
If you are hunting near Chama NM, be prepared for rocks and deep snow. The Chama area just received new snow, so take something insulated, Gore tex, and with a tread to protect you from rocks.

Also take some gaiters. They say water can't run uphill, but snow seems to travel up your legs without gaiters.

You may want to take boot dryers or an extra pair of boots.
 
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