First time antelope hunt

Lnewton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2020
Messages
89
Location
Duncan Oklahoma
I have hunted whitetail since I was a boy and also other species including elk but this will be my first year to hunt Antelope. I am curious if there are any items I need to add to my pack or gear to be ready for this hunt? My youngest son drew a September rifle tag for the Oklahoma panhandle so we will be headed up there. Any help would be great!

i was thinking a fold up decoy for sure but unsure of other things we might need.
 

CO_Guy

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Joined
Nov 16, 2018
Messages
1,361
Location
CO, USA
Aside from pack items, you'll be on flatland so be ready to have a hoist or other available for skinning. We use 3 tipi poles when we hunt just a bit W of where you'll be. If you see them in a place just before dark, they'll most likely be there at sun up. Good luck, that area should have a lot of nicely fed critters!
 

nevada75

Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2013
Messages
22
Location
Ely, NV
I suggest a dedicated large cooler full of ice. I do the gutless method to break antelope down to four quarters, backstrap, tenderloin, etc. Makes packing it in a cooler super easy. If you're doing a shoulder mount talk to your taxidermist about their recommendation for dealing with the heat to preserve the cape.
 

1moredeer

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Joined
Jan 29, 2020
Messages
157
Location
Northeast TX
My Dad, brother and myself have all been drawn for the Oklahoma panhandle Antelope hunt over the years. I was the first one of us to draw and scored on a beautiful 12 3/4” ivory tipped buck with a perfect heart on his head. My Dad and brother both scored on nice bucks as well on their respective hunts. The land is flat for the most part and you can see for miles except into the small folds and rises in the land. Unless you have permission (usually requiring a trespass fee) on private property, you will be hunting on federal and state property. These blocks are laid out in square miles, usually with a windmill for water on it and multiple cross fences leading back to the windmill. The blocks are leased out for grazing cattle. When I hunted, I hunted the public ground. My Dad and brother both paid a trespass fee. There is a lot of competition on the public land even though there is a lot of it. Those paying trespass fees are often on private property surrounded by public which they can also hunt. It’s probably one of the most enjoyable hunts I’ve ever done. You are spotting and stalking not setting in a stand like hunting white tails. If I were going on this hunt I would take a flat shooting rifle that I know inside and out (I shot mine with a 270 win at 542 yds), top end glass and a good range finder, knee pads and leather gloves for crawling, and a lot of patience. I wouldn’t use a decoy on public land for safety reasons. All of the hype you hear about their eyesight is absolutely true. They can bust you from over a mile and leave you thinking it’s impossible to get in on them. Shoot me a pm if you have specific questions.
 

lancetkenyon

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Joined
Jun 3, 2013
Messages
3,604
Location
Arizona
Good optics. Good rangefinder. Very accurate rifle.
This is typical pronghorn terrain. Flat, mostly featureless. Use any break you can. A single bush, a 3' deep cut, a 4' rise, a yucca, a taller clump of grass, anything. I have had pronghorn peg us at a mile, and at 1000 yards, they head for the next County. Glassing up pronghorn from a mile or two or even 3 is common. But being able to discern if they are worth going after is priceless. A 10-16 mile a day of walking is common. So knowing what is worth chasing is imperative. I bought a new BTX 95 for this year. My 15s are great for finding them, but a 36x is going to be super nice to really see what we are going after. We have been pretty lucky and shot pronghorn at 183, 260, 331, 391, 460. But had numerous opportunities at 500-800+ that just didn't pan out.
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Hawk in WY

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Joined
Aug 28, 2013
Messages
91
Antelope have excellent vision. Their eyes have built in range finders. Even if not hunted heavily they will spook when you are within 500 yards if that is the effective shooting range of those hunting them. Practice long range, particularly with wind.

If over 50 years of age, use a .270.

If under 50, use a 6.5 PRC.

Any good 125 to 150 grain bullet will do the job. Antelope are not hard to kill.

Good luck
 

cabelasken

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Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
102
Location
Nevada
After your kill and pics, field dress and skin the antelope as soon as you can to provide the best tasting meat after the hunt. I've been told by those who have taken a lot of these game animals that you have 45 minutes to an hour before the oil from the skin has an adverse effect on the taste of the meat. I've tasted antelope from both scenarios and much prefer the ones properly cared for.
 
D

Deleted member 118627

Guest
Congratulations on being selected. Diligently practice your long range shooting. Record your dope. As others have said a rangefinder is a requirement. Ice is a fantastic recommendation.
Speed goats can be challenging, but they are one of my favorites. Best of luck to you and your party!
 
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