First hand load was a misfire

Bill Maylor

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Jul 16, 2008
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234
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Bay,CO florida.
I finely set up for reloading and loaded up 35 rounds total with Varget using 165gr SGK. Starting with 5 rounds ea with 42.5gr,43,43.5,44,44.5,45,45.5. It was very disappointing on my first round, IT WAS A DUD! A total of 7 of the 35 rounds were duds! after taking the rounds apart and looking at them and comparing them to the rounds that fired it looks like I seated the primers to deep. Is this possible? The firing pin marks were not as deep compared to the ones that fired. This is all new to me so it was scary to use the hammer style bullet puller the first time, but it worked. Now I have to remove the unfired primers. should I just use my collet decapping die slowly or put some water in the case then run it through just like any other case? By the way I was shooting a put me together 308 Savage 110 action sent to Shilen, and they did some handy work and made a 26" Bull CM, And they set it up real nice:):). I had been working on a Boyd thumbhole stock for a couple of years. Topped it with a Zeiss 6X20X50 Conquest. It looks like the 44gr and above grouped better. I did not measure the targets but these holes were touching each other. I dont think this rifle is broke in yet. I got 70 rounds down the tube. I was a little disappointed with my first outing of hand loading, But I do understand experencance is the best teacher. Bill Maylor..
 

Jinx-)

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Aug 23, 2009
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Bill, what kind of brass and what primers did you use? Did you use any kind primer sealants? Primer pocket uniformer is nice tool to have to set primer pockets to same dimensions...

as far as misfired primers, use FL or neck sizing die just extend decaping assembly more out slowly lower you lever, no water necessary even if it ignites no biggie, wear eye protection and you'll be fine
 
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JUDD

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BLOOMSBURG, PA
I got a bad batch of winny primers once...1 out of every 3 would misfire...threw the whole brick away and never had a misfire since.

Never used winny primers again...:)
 

MontanaRifleman

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May 21, 2008
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South of Canada and North of Wyoming
You might have an issue with your firing pin. You could have a bad batch of primers, but I have never heard of that big a failure rate before. My first suspicion would be the firing pin and next the primers. In fact, my first suspicion would always be the firing pin.
 

elkoholic72

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Feb 9, 2009
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Laurel, Montana
To me it seems more like a headspace problem than the primers or firing pin. You said you just got the rifle back, have you shot any factory rounds out of it and how did yhey do? How did you set the die up and was it full length?
Try placing a piece of scotch tape over the end of the case(across the primer)and chamber a round. Will the bolt still close? You could either be overworking your brass making it to short, or your headspace is a little off(Long). Way back when I started rebarreling savages, had the same identical problem happen.
Good luck whatever it is.
If you need a 308 headspace gage, i could let you borrow a set or your local smith would probably check it for you.
 
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Fitch

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Aug 5, 2009
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Carlisle, PA
To me it seems more like a headspace problem than the primers or firing pin.
+1. Assuming it's a new chamber headspace is the most likely culprit.

I'd definitely try at least a No-Go gage in it - preferably both gages. If it's only a few thou off it's a piece of cake to fix since it's a Savage and has the barrel nut.

Fitch
 

Kevin Thomas

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Feb 16, 2009
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Sedalia, MO
Bill,

It's almost impossible to set a primer too deep, so I seriously doubt that that's what caused your misfires. I'm with Fitch and Elkaholic here, I think you've probably got a headspace problem. Could be the brass and how far the shoulder was bumped, or, as they pointed out, it could be in the chamber. Few questions for you;

You mentioned this is a new rifle, but is it having any misfire problems with factory ammo? I assume that's what accounted for the first 70 rounds you mentioned?

Did you use new brass, or fired brass from another source to make up your first reloads? If it was new brass, did you run it through a sizer first?

If you did, how'd you set the die up? Usually, setting a factory die to contact the shell holder won't cause a huge headspace issue, but with certain combinations, it's possible.

Do you have a gage to help you adjust the die set-up, and see what's coming out of the chamber after a case is fired? If not, I'd recommend one. Plenty of good ones availabel depending on what style you like, but it'll allow you to know whats truly stacking up when a round is in that chamber.

The only other thing that jumps to mind wold be too much grease in the firing pin spring, but that's a stretch, and really only applicable when there's way too much and the temps are well below freezing. Dosen't sound like a possibility here, but hey, it's been mentioned now.

Keep us posted and let us know what you find.

Kevin Thomas
Lapua USA
 

Bill Maylor

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Jul 16, 2008
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234
Location
Bay,CO florida.
You guys are good. All the things posted I am guilty of in some way. The brass is all winchester, the primers were CCI. I bought all Lee stuff, 3die sets and crimp dies, They have the Fl dies in the sets. The Breach lock challanger kit. Lee OALcase gage and cutter,pocket primer, RCBS flash hole deburing tool , Lee powder scale. I found on utube how to make a bullet that slides in a case when it is chambered then mesured. My rifle mesured 2.8555 three times in a rowe, so I tried to set the Lee seating die to 2.8545. Only a few round came out that length. I am not sure what head space is? I guss I over worked the brass in the prep work. The 35th round misfired and when I went to eject the shell the round came apart and power went everywere:rolleyes:. It was a fun day. I am going to read the instructions again an reset up the dies and try again. When I clean my rifles I always put 1 drop of Breakfree oil on the fring pin. Is that to much? I will also say the grouping of the hand loaded rounds that went off were 1/2 the size of the factory loadsgun)Bill Maylor..
 

justgoto

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Apr 11, 2009
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636
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Carrollton, Ohio
When I clean my rifles I always put 1 drop of Breakfree oil on the fring pin. Is that to much?
I used to put a drop of oil on my pin, I don't since I read this article.

Basic Rifle Maintenance - Part 1

By Vince Bottomley

We do not want ANY grease or oil on the spring or pin – it will cause drag and increase lock-time! Again, dry off with an air-line if you have one. A light spray with WD40 is all we need – no oil or grease on the spring or pin please!
 

Kevin Thomas

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Feb 16, 2009
Messages
1,256
Location
Sedalia, MO
I used to put a drop of oil on my pin, I don't since I read this article.

Basic Rifle Maintenance - Part 1

By Vince Bottomley
I'll have to take exception to some of the comments in this one, specifically in re the WD-40. That's one product that I'll avoid for most firearm applications, especially in regards to the bolt. Problem is, it tends to gum up and forms a pretty tough varnish as it dries. Use a lube, such as a light oil, and use it in moderation. WD-40 is fine for applications where water needs to be displaced (which from what I understand, is what the "WD" actually stands for) but it's not a great lubricant. We need to use some common sense here, and match the prep work to what we'll be doing. If you're hunting in a wet climate, some oil that ill prevent rusting is probably in order, and a generous amount of it. If you're hunting in the arrid southwest, oil tends to attract and hold sand, grit, and all kinds of other crap you don't need associated with your bolt or firing pin. In that case, since rust isn't likely to be a problem, shoot it bone-dry, maybe with a bit of a dry graphite type lubricant. If you're shooting in an extremely cold climate, avoid any type of oil or grease that will stiffen up when you're in the field, as that'll reduce the firing pin's strike. In essence, there's not so much a "right" way to clean/lube the firing pin as there are a lot of "wrong" ways, depending on the circumstances you're shooting in. What's right in one, can be problematic in another. Match the technique to the situation, and you're ahead of thre curve.

That said, I'm still leaning towards headspace as being the cause of the misfires in this case.

Kevin Thomas
Lapua USA
 

lamiglas

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Joined
Mar 20, 2008
Messages
714
ever punctured a primer? I have punctured a primer before and the little piece that fell out ended up in my bolt. i was getting light hits on the primer but it was not firing. i took the bolt apart and taped it on the counter, the peice fell out and no problems.

just a thought.
 

Bill Maylor

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Jul 16, 2008
Messages
234
Location
Bay,CO florida.
I am going to air clean my bolt and firingpin. I thought I was doing the right thing. I dont know what head space is. That must be the distance between my ears!! Shelin set up the action and their barrel. I am very happy with their work. The rifle's action has never misfired with factory ammo so it must be me. In the last post the Lamiglas decribed it best as a light strike. So I hope cleaning the the pin and bolt will help. I have not loaded any more rounds yet. I am going to reset my dies and try again. That little voice in my headspace told me not to trim down the cases after the first shooting, but I had to use my new tools..I will pay more attention to the prep work and not use so much wax, and make all the rookie mistakes
. Bill Maylor
 

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