Does a heavier bullet kill better?

six pack

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Houston, TX
Here's a response based on experience with Accubonds.....use the heavier bullet! Accubonds tend to over-fragment over 3000fps. If you hit a bone, you will likely wind up with a shallow wound and could lose the animal. I have found a heavier Accubond at 2850-2950 is very lethal, will perform as designed and is much more likely to exit with a good blood trail, if needed, for recovery. Just my occasionally humble opinion based on several years using the bullets in a variety of calibers.
 

baldhunter

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From what I've seen over the years is the bullet that leave the biggest wound channel is going to be the quicker killer.I look for a bullet that will give me a complete pass through,but also shed a little weigh but retain enough to make it completely through.So it really depends on the bullet itself.For deer,in my 7mag,I really like the 150gr Ballistic Tip better than the 160gr Accubond.They both are great bullets,but the Ballistic Tip is giving me just a tad bigger wound channel than the Accubond.The bonded bullet retains weight better because it's bonded.I've also shot the 140gr Accubond but I like the 150 gr Ballistic Tip way better than that bullet and would go with the 160gr Accubond over the 140.Years ago I used to used the 160gr Grand Slam.It was a very stout bullet that killed,but deer would usually run a ways.I dropped down to 145gr and it gave me much quicker kills.So it really depends on the game your shooting and the bullet and speed your pushing it.If you ever find the magic bullet that works,stay with it and you will be happy.
 

TheLongRanger83702

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A very interesting read. I unknowingly found the same thing as mentioned in part
IV. B. iii. a. .308 Caliber Bullets . Over the years I've opted for the heavier bullets myself with both my 308 Win and 300 WinMag. The same also with my .45ACP. The problem still with the heavier projectiles was finding ones that held their accuracy out to longer ranges that I hunt with. @ 350+ yards.
I was surprised how little the lighter 30 cal bullets opened up compared to heavier ones.
Thanks for the article.
 

Frank Kalisz

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The higher velocity will of course make up the energy for the smaller Accubond. But what’s more important to me is that any higher velocity (like cited 3100fps) will destroy a lot more meat than a slower velocity larger projectile.

for what it’s worth.. I actually prefer the 165 Accubond at 2650fps out of my 308win. It kills huge hogs very nicely. DRT!
 

uncle_motorhead

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Oct 21, 2008
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The "best bullet" is the one that expends its energy in the game... NOT into the dirt in the off side.
So a varmint bullet that blows up on the surface and turns to sand powder beats a mono that punches a 2 inch hole all the way through sucking a half pint of blood out with it as it exits?
 

436

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I'm just going to say; I think in most calibers at close to moderate ranges using heavier bullets kill better on most medium to large game. There, I said it.
 

Arkansasdad

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Hespco

I know exactly what a mono bullet is and it’s benefits. I do not think a mono is needed on a whitetail or antelope. However, my question doesn’t matter the bullet. All I want to know is does a lighter bullet or heavier bullet kill better. That is all.

Thanks
Steve
OK- get your popcorn out because here is a can worms about to opened...
You can look at the Taylor Knockout or a potential killing formula to get a better understanding of the question. Just remember to figure everything at the same yardage for comparison. A 12 ga. slug has a very high potential at 20 yds. but at 100 yds. not so much. This is not the holy grail but it will give an better understanding of the external ballistics for a given yardage. This is what the feds use to determine a calibers use for specific tasks up to artillery. Try it after you figure a few you will get a better idea of ballistics. There are some calculators out there but when you do it yourself a person gets a lot more out of it.
I use; E · SD · FA = PK
E=energy (at a given yardage. I usually figure at 100 yds.)
SD= sectional density of the bullet
FA= frontal area of the bullet (bullet dia.² · .7854= inches²)
PK= potential killing


For purposes of this conversation, let's us the following situation:

308 Win 20" Barrel with 1-10 twist
125 gr Nosler Accubond - Muzzle Velocity of 3105 fps - Muzzle Energy of 2676 ft.lbs.
vs
150 gr Nosler Accubond - Muzzle Velocity of 2805 fps - Muzzle Energy of 2621 ft.lbs.

Let's say the range of the shot is not effected by BC difference and accuracy is the same. Shot placement being the same (I know impact is different), but regardless of high shoulder or lungs.

Which one will be more effect on game and why do you believe that?

Thank you,
Steve[/QUOTE
 

David Lindler

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Jun 11, 2018
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south carloina
Deer sized game are thin skined. Lighter and faster with a good bullet will dump more energy into the animal causing more tissue damage and hydrostatic shock/ kenetic energy. If you look a the laws of physics, speed is what kills.. Heavy for caliber bullets are better for long range because they retain more energy at longer range than lighter bullets. A lot of the 180 grain and up weight bullets don't expand as violently on thin skinned game especially at longer ranges. Check out cutting edge bullets and look at their raptor line of bullets. High speed and massive tissue damage and energy dump.
 

jarnold37

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Dec 21, 2010
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For purposes of this conversation, let's us the following situation:

308 Win 20" Barrel with 1-10 twist
125 gr Nosler Accubond - Muzzle Velocity of 3105 fps - Muzzle Energy of 2676 ft.lbs.
vs
150 gr Nosler Accubond - Muzzle Velocity of 2805 fps - Muzzle Energy of 2621 ft.lbs.

Let's say the range of the shot is not effected by BC difference and accuracy is the same. Shot placement being the same (I know impact is different), but regardless of high shoulder or lungs.

Which one will be more effect on game and why do you believe that?

Thank you,
Steve
Don't know if there is a right or wrong answer here, but I have a few things I would like to say on the matter and don't really know which side to take here. I think that remaining energy should be considered in this. Example: my wife shot her first deer at 100 yds through the lungs with a 22-250. Bullet did not exit but fragmented inside. The big doe dropped and didn't kick. The lungs and heart was mush. Another time my son shot a small deer with a 250grn bullet at 3200 fps and the deer ran 400 yds till it bled out. The 250 grn bullet would have probably killed another deer maybe two as the big bullet passed through all of them with little chance to expend the energy the bullet carried. We have a 25-06 that would not "drop a deer" with the 120grn bullet. Went to 87 grn and out to 400 yds it showed the same characteristics as the 22-250. No pass through and total fragmentation. I have a 30-378 and my daughter shot a big doe with 180 grn. It ran like wasn't hit but the deer behind it fell dead as the bullet passed through the first dear. The first deer ran 250 yds and died. I chambered a barrel in 30-378 with 14" twist. Shot 125 grns at 4050 fps. Never did have a deer go anywhere even at 572 yd shot. Even tried Speer TNT 125 grn with very thin jacket which is made to fragment in slower velocity guns (308). Helped a farmer with a deer permit and shot deer from 50 yds to just under 500 yds. All deer dropped and no pass through. This bullet was very accurate at 4050 fps. The reason being that the velocity was ample for the little bullet to fragment and expend its energy in the deer. Usually a big bullet going slow will leave discouraging results unless a shoulder or bone is hit. An arrow leaves a big hole but deer always run because there is no hydrostatic shock. Longer distances with small bullets cause energy to dissipate below levels that implement shock.
 

Trnelson

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Nebraska
The OP has the answer in his original post. It is simple physics; EK=1/2M*v^2
The energy, or lack there of, determines how little or how much a bullet deforms in a given medium. Given the same bullet type and construction, the bullet that retains the most energy at a given distance will produce a more substantial wound.
It is important to also note that in the above equation M is a single multiple and V is squared. A small change in V effects energy much more than a similar change in M. Heavier for caliber bullets normally have a higher ballistic coefficient so they have a greater M, but retain V in a more efficient manner than a lighter bullet with a lessor ballistic coefficient. Choose a bullet that best fits your hunting style and the landscape that you hunt in.
 

5.56×250

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The extra shock from the increase in velocity gets my vote. Higher velocity on thin skinned critters. Heavier bullet for added penetration on heavy bones critters.
That said, I dont know that your examples justify enough difference to matter on game. Comparing say a 125 gr 308 to a 200 gr 308 would drive home the differences on game.
Of course, based on the close ranges in your examples.
 

wonderman4

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Oct 7, 2013
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South Texas
Whether you hit it in the head with a baseball bat or take an end to end shot with a 50 BMG, dead is dead. No argument about that.

While my Dad was still hunting, from 1974 until he stopped (somewhere around 2007) he shot the Speer Hot Cor exclusively 30-06 cal 150 gr. He never lost an animal and ALL were 1 shot DRT kills. 1976 is when he started using the Speer bullet.

A boyhood friend shot a 222 Rem 50 gr bullet and never lost an animal.
 

Edd

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Tulsa
..... All I want to know is does a lighter bullet or heavier bullet kill better. That is all.

Thanks
Steve
I vote for the heavy bullet.

Your scenario is a difficult one to put apply a visual to. If you choose a more extreme scenario, I think it is easier to imagine a difference.

If you are in a face off with a Hungry Griz at 50 yards, would you prefer a 243 Win loaded with an 85 gr Partition or a 358 Win loaded with a 225 gr Partition?
 

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