Copper removal ?

tnek13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
66
Location
NW Indiana
A clean barrel shoots better.! Copper and Carbon need to be removed. There are several good products and everybody has a favorite. I like KG products, years ago I used Hoppies, Sweets, and JB because that is what was available, today there are dozens of brands that do the job as well or better. Pick a system that works for you and clean the barrel regularly, like after each trip to the range.
 

Rick Richard

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Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
2,884
Location
North Carolina
A clean barrel shoots better.! Copper and Carbon need to be removed. There are several good products and everybody has a favorite. I like KG products, years ago I used Hoppies, Sweets, and JB because that is what was available, today there are dozens of brands that do the job as well or better. Pick a system that works for you and clean the barrel regularly, like after each trip to the range.
That is not necessarily true. Some barrels like clean barrels, however most need to have some fouling to achieve best accuracy. At least based on all the ones I have had experience with.
 

6MM06AI

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
124
Location
SE. Montana
I used to use sweets and barnes cr10 and have tried montana copper killer, now I brush the barrel with Hoppes #9 run a few wet patches of hoppes to finish getting the powder fouling out then run some wipe out patch out, normally the barrel is clean with about 6 to 8 patches. Won't use anything else ever again, Love that Wipe out patch out!
 

Bruce Treloar

Active Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2017
Messages
30
A clean barrel shoots better.! Copper and Carbon need to be removed. There are several good products and everybody has a favorite. I like KG products, years ago I used Hoppies, Sweets, and JB because that is what was available, today there are dozens of brands that do the job as well or better. Pick a system that works for you and clean the barrel regularly, like after each trip to the range.
Have to agree with the above "Clean Barrels shoot best". Beware of copper eating solvents like Sweets as if left in a barrel over night can cause pitting in chrome moly barrels. Sweets is a fast acting solvent ideal for removing copper between competition shooting relays. The only way I can keep my rifles shooting well is by using JB fawn and JB blue non embedding jewelers rouge.
Shooters ask , will it wear a barrel out being a mild abrasive, well I'm yet to detect any loss of barrel life. However I see barrels ruined after one day out hunting.
Here's what I do:- Lets say we pick up a new hammer forged barrel Model 70 Winchester.
Then slug the barrel to gauge any tight spots hoping the patch becomes tighter towards the muzzle. Then cast a metal lap in the muzzle and lap the barrel with a 320 grade aluminium oxide grit making sure to work on any tight spots usually felt under screw holes and stampings. Cean out all the abrasive material till completely gone. Now with all the upgrades completed go to the range, fit your scope and adjust,, cleaning after each shot with Butchers, then fawn JB. Make sure all JB is removed before firing again. The barrel should now feel like pushing your foot into a knee boot full of sago. From here on the barrel will tell you how to clean keeping in mind it won't shoot when fouled with copper. I usually clean factory barrels after 5 shots and custom barrels no more than 10 shots. Use tight roll on patches so you can feel any copper build up. I can't feel anything when using spear patches.
 

Gary Schnicke

Member
Joined
May 15, 2019
Messages
6
Location
Three Forks, MT
Just a quick report for whoever is interested. I tried Hoppe’s no. 9 foaming bore cleaner today for the first time. Had about 120 rounds through my PRS rifle and it removed all the copper with 2 applications (let it soak about 15 minutes with each application). Pleasantly surprised. As a bonus it got most of the carbon. I normally run C4 carbon remover as the final cleaning step in an attempt to remove as much carbon as possible but after the Hoppe’s there was very little carbon remaining. No brushing used.
Beware of Hoppe's foaming bore cleaner! Just received info from a police armorer who was warning all officers that the use of Hoppes Foaming cleaner had resulted in several handguns freezing up and unable to fire. Apparently the cleaner leaves a glue like residue that seizes up the action and is extremely difficult to remove.
 

Huntz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2019
Messages
84
Location
NE Wisconsin
When I shot High Power(CMP) I used an AR-15 as service rifle.I would sometimes shoot a whole weekend without cleaning.I would borescope the barrel when I got home to determine if I needed to clean it.If I needed to clean I would fowl the barrel with a dozen rounds before the next match.Just saying that a clean barrel is not needed to shoot accurately.Only when accuracy diminishes ,do I clean and re fowl.When I am done shooting for the year and put the gun in storage,I give it a good cleaning and use a preservative oil such as WD 40 Long Term Preservative for storing.
 

Gone Ballistic

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
410
Location
Orofino, Idaho
Whatever you decide to do, make sure that you fire a few shots if you've cleaned your barrel before you take it hunting. I've seen many people who sight in their rifles and clean their barrel thoroughly then, take it hunting. Usually a good rifle shoots best after a few rounds have passed through the barrel. Clean rifles seldom shoot where you have sighted them in before cleaning.
If I am going to go hunting within a month or two after sighting my rifle in and cleaning, I always shoot a round through and then I shoot a couple more aiming to check point of impact.
 

JTB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
285
Location
AZ
Beware of Hoppe's foaming bore cleaner! Just received info from a police armorer who was warning all officers that the use of Hoppes Foaming cleaner had resulted in several handguns freezing up and unable to fire. Apparently the cleaner leaves a glue like residue that seizes up the action and is extremely difficult to remove.
Good info. I have used foaming cleaners for many years and quickly learned to leave the applicator tube in the bore after foaming so the foam remains in the bore only (tube will normally seal 25-27 cal) and to clean the chamber and bore with brake cleaner prior to lubricating and storing the rifle. Also, do not use foaming cleaners in gas operated rifles.
 

santosh55

New Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2020
Messages
2
Location
bhopal
Generally it is believed that there needs to be some copper in the bore to provide consistent accuracy.If you clean out all of the copper then you will likely have to fire a few shots to get the barrel shooting consistently again.

Degreaser
 

LDHunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2001
Messages
643
Location
NW Florida Piney Woods
I actually shoot groups from unfouled barrels quite often and with most of my rifles I don't see much difference but you need to actually get a barrel clean of power and copper fouling completely for this to work. If you don't get your barrel truly clean then you definitely need fouling shots. I'm talking about either quality custom barrels or very good factory barrels here and yes I own a few remarkable factory barrels.

Give this theory a try. Now if I were competing (which I don't intend to do) I'd pad my bets and foul any barrel before actually shooting for group but for hunting I've proven over and over through my 50 years of shooting that I can still get great accuracy even from my first shot from a truly clean barrel.

I hope y'all are removing most of the oil from your barrels before that first shot after cleaning. If you're not then there is your need for a fouling shot proven. Not only is it critical to remove most of the oil from a barrel to reduce harm to a barrel from that bullet having to deal with little globs of oil intermittently scattered down the bore but custom barrel makers will tell you that shooting an oily bore with cause small pits in the barrel from the hydraulic action of the bullet compressing that oil as it speeds down the bore. Plus that oil will cause erratic groups.

The proper technique is to get the bore squeaky clean and then to dry patch out all your solvents and oils and then to apply some fine oil such as Kroil with a wet patch followed by a dry patch to get most of that oil out leaving a very fine film. Then you're good to shoot.

Here's another thought. I never put a gun away with a dirty bore. Under that powder and copper fouling you will end up with trapped moisture and then rust. All rifle barrels rust. How much they rust is up to you but if you clean a bore and then put in a quality oil your chances of rust are GREATLY reduced. You can run that dry patch I suggested earlier just before hunting or shooting at the range. See? I just told you how to go hunting without having to fire a fouling shot or shots. ;)

If you're hunting game and your shots are likely to be 300yds or closer then the dry patch to remove the bulk of the oil is enough. If you're likely to shoot beyond 300yds then you should know your rifle well enough to know how many fouling shots (if any) you need to get it shooting to it's peak accuracy.

When you get home or back to camp and you haven't fired your rifle then remember to run at least one oily patch down your bore to prevent rust and remove any grit that might have found it's way in your bore from a day of carrying and then a dry patch again before hunting. If you have fired it either one or just a few shots I'd suggest getting it clean again.

At some point in almost any night in almost any climate you will hit a dew point where the air will become very moist and that is death on non oiled barrels and if you're out hunting it won't take long for rust damage to start in that barrel. If you spend much time with a bore scope you'll learn to spot rust and rust damage. It's a crying shame to let a good barrel suffer from any more rust damage than the tiny bit that will inevitably happen if you are diligent about keeping at least some oil in the bore when you're not carrying the rifle ready to shoot.

Just one man's opinion backed up by many years of learning the hard way and ruining several barrels before I figured out the above stuff....
 

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