Brass Weight?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by samson, May 2, 2003.

  1. samson

    samson Well-Known Member

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    Do you guys separate your brass by weight, and if so, does it have major effects on accuracy by doing this. I recently purchased some NORMA 300 win mag brass and am noticing some weight differences. Is this something to be concerned about?
     
  2. jcpython357

    jcpython357 Well-Known Member

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    samson, Only if your shooting past 300 yds. J [​IMG]
     
  3. samson

    samson Well-Known Member

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    I definitely will be. I am assuming that different weight means that the capicity inside is different?
     
  4. jcpython357

    jcpython357 Well-Known Member

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    samson, Not always, I've got some Fed. 22-250 brass that holds the same amount of 296 powder as Rem. brass yet weighs 10grs. more. Take your heaviest and lightest piece you got and prime them and take some of the finest powder you have or some table salt would work too and fill em' both up while tapping the case on your bench a bit to settle the contents and weigh them to see any difference. At any rate I'd weigh each case if shooting LR just to be sure and your bullets, too. Jay
     
  5. Darryl Cassel

    Darryl Cassel Well-Known Member

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    Sampson

    You would be surprised as to what you will find when shooting your loads over a Chronograph.

    Even weighing the brass out as close as possible really don't mean much. To get the true shooting accuracy from the cases, they MUST "all" shoot within around 10 to 15 FPS extreme spread and closer is better.

    This is checked at 100 yards and when you get the ES close, you will see the group will tighten up.

    If your a 1000 yard target shooter, this procedure is a MUST.
    The cases and loads MUST match for extreme accuracy.

    For LR Hunting and with a spotter shot first, this extreme is not as critical unless you want to have the best accuracy as possible.

    Normally we boost the load for winter time LR hunting to buck the higher winds encountered in the mountains. A spotter is the key for this style hunting.

    Later
    DC
     
  6. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    Most BR shooters use cases within 2 grains of each other. This is of course more or less than neccasary depending on how big the case is. A 308 Win case 2 grains more than its comparision case will be more noticable than a .300 Win mag. (grain differance per total weight ratio.) The 2 grains in a 308 wont amount to much unless you are trying to shoot a .000" group. I think if it werent for shooting the impossible, none of us would be here on this site. For best results, shoot the same brass.