Barrel straightening.

J E Custom

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Joined
Jul 29, 2004
Messages
10,169
Location
Texas
There have been many post about straight barrel and testing them before starting a project. Before the shooting world saw many improvements in machining and tooling, most barrels had to be straightened after boring and rifling.

Here are some of the old tools and methods required to end up with a straight barrel. I saw one of these early barrel straighteners and was fascinated by the skill of the Gunsmith and the fact that this process required true north light. The tool had a large hand wheel that applied forced in the center of the bend of the barrel between two points and the gunsmith looked down the bore and had to judge how far past straight he had to go to allow for the barrel to spring back to be straight.

We are very fortunate to have the quality of present day barrel makers and with a little testing we can find a near perfectly straight barrel.

The link below shows some of the tool that were used and a barrel straightener that was used and one of the best of them.

https://www.nps.gov/spar/learn/historyculture/machines.htm

enjoy

J E CUSTOM
 

david g ranes

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Joined
Sep 9, 2009
Messages
216
Unless they've changed very recently, Savage still straightens barrels the "old fashioned way" with a handwheel press.

View attachment 185601
I seen the guy for savage do it on tv said he used a light to show shadows would bend barrel until no more shadow they said the man that done it for them was unbelievable on how straight he could get a barrel. David
 

ntsqd

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Nov 16, 2015
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Location
Upper SoKA
Watched a wizard straighten a forged Big Block Chevy stroker crank after it warped in heat-treating. It was out of true by almost .015"TIR when measured at the middle bearing journal and supported by the front and rear bearing journals. Took him about 20 mins to bring it down to within .0001" TIR He did it entirely with a 24 oz. hammer and a big chisel that had it's point carefully hand ground to a specific radius that matched journal's radii.

That a barrel can be straightened by such a seemingly crude method is not a surprise. I'm also sure that not just anyone can do that job!
 

JMW67

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Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
584
Location
TEXAS
Watched a wizard straighten a forged Big Block Chevy stroker crank after it warped in heat-treating. It was out of true by almost .015"TIR when measured at the middle bearing journal and supported by the front and rear bearing journals. Took him about 20 mins to bring it down to within .0001" TIR He did it entirely with a 24 oz. hammer and a big chisel that had it's point carefully hand ground to a specific radius that matched journal's radii.

That a barrel can be straightened by such a seemingly crude method is not a surprise. I'm also sure that not just anyone can do that job!
thing would look like a horse shoe when I got through
 

Bill Cauley Jr

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Messages
1,111
Location
Tn
Unless they've changed very recently, Savage still straightens barrels the "old fashioned way" with a handwheel press.

View attachment 185601
Most manufacturers seem to have basically the same process but this is new to me I wonder if that’s what makes savages shoot so well to look through their barrels with the borescope they are not much different than any manufacturer but they are known to be Shooter’s I wonder if this is what makes the difference
 

tobnpr

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Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
66
Most manufacturers seem to have basically the same process but this is new to me I wonder if that’s what makes savages shoot so well to look through their barrels with the borescope they are not much different than any manufacturer but they are known to be Shooter’s I wonder if this is what makes the difference
I've yet to see a Savage barrel through a borescope that didn't scare the hell out of me.
This includes a recently acquired .338 LM that somehow manages to shoot sub minute (barely so) despite some of the worst chatter from a rifling button I've ever seen...

I don't know of any other production mfr. that does it, so it's certainly feasible that this combined with the floating bolthead contributes to the out-of-the-box accuracy that's generally pretty good.

JMO, YMMV.
 

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