Another boot selection thread

RckyMtnRutt

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Mar 23, 2021
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Boise
I just wear altra lone peak trail runners. Wearing boots for a living, I have to say, they are horrible for hiking. That’s why real hikers don’t wear boots. Haha

Now, I know we all don’t hunt just the early season, so when snow starts to fall, i usually default to my salmon quest as my boot of choice.

I reckon if you have two different foot sizes you’d have to call the company and see what they can do for you. Probably easier than buying 3rd party.
I always like the idea of trail runners when im on trails but when you start off with no trail and the only trail you ever hit is a game trail you need a boot. No way in hell id pack out a bull elk out of my country with trail runners. Also ive had braches and rocks that would leave me on the mtn if i were in trail runners.
 

dfanonymous

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1,686
I always like the idea of trail runners when im on trails but when you start off with no trail and the only trail you ever hit is a game trail you need a boot. No way in hell id pack out a bull elk out of my country with trail runners. Also ive had braches and rocks that would leave me on the mtn if i were in trail runners.
You the only one that hikes in to hunt? I do the same thing. I hunt expedition hunts, and I live out west. I hunt about every western state I can get a tag for.

Half my stalks are in socks, branches and rocks are of no concern to me in trail runners…any more than 4-8000ft elevation gain in boots…also not on a trail. Especially by mile 10+
Sounds like a good way to be sidelined for the rest of your hunt with a rolled/sprained ankle if you ask me. I wear boots for a living as well, and would take the extra ankle support when packing weight or navigating terrain. My Lowas are nearly as comfortable as a sneaker to my foot.
I personally don’t have weak ankles. Even in the military, the mil version of the salomon xa’s were money. I know more guys that rolled ankles in boots then trail runners haha.

Trail runners are lighter. Anyone that hikes knows the benefit to that. They have better traction in general and they breath and drain much faster.

Most trail runners have a rock plate for those concerned about their sensitive feet.

One of best reasons I like the Altra specifically are because of the large toe box. Gives me a better sense of the ground and terrain.
 
Last edited:

Philward

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Oct 17, 2015
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Wa
How will you get boots that fit if one for is 1.5 sizes different? But 2 pair to make one pair? Or just stuff something in the other one till it fits.
 

wasskeet

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Jan 17, 2021
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North Carolina
How will you get boots that fit if one for is 1.5 sizes different? But 2 pair to make one pair? Or just stuff something in the other one till it fits.
That's a good question. One item I did not mention is that the smaller foot is slightly wider and thicker than the other (crushed in a car accident as a child). This helps somewhat with the size differential as a larger is not as loose as it could be. I have managed for quite a few years just trying on pair after pair to get a fit that is decent.
If I could find an app as Troutslayer2 mentioned - I'd be overjoyed!

Thanks again for all the advice!
 

Flyjunky

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Oct 9, 2021
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That's a good question. One item I did not mention is that the smaller foot is slightly wider and thicker than the other (crushed in a car accident as a child). This helps somewhat with the size differential as a larger is not as loose as it could be. I have managed for quite a few years just trying on pair after pair to get a fit that is decent.
If I could find an app as Troutslayer2 mentioned - I'd be overjoyed!

Thanks again for all the advice!
If I were you I would call a custom boot maker and talk with them. It sounds as though you'll need not only a different size for each foot you might need a different last as well.
 

jbronner13

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May 27, 2022
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370
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Winchester, NH
I've searched through quite a few boot hunt threads and got one question answered (who is good to order multiple pairs from with no return issues? Scheels/BlackOvis - but one remains.

I've got one foot almost a size and half larger than other, toes longer than big toe on both feet and need wide toe box. Outside of that needs are pretty basic: relatively light, non or little insulation, waterproofed, decent support for uneven ground and at least 8" height. These will be a combo knock around/hunting boot.

What are some good options? Thanks for your response.
Where do you hunt? Cold or warm area? Stand hunting or stalking?

I started hunting as an adult because I grew up in Mother Russia’s US Enclave Massachusetts so a lot of my gear choices have been through trial and error and lots of expense. My feet are flatter than Gwyneth Paltrow’s *** so I generally need a boot that has a higher heel and toes that curve up to take the strain off my calves. I do a lot of still hunting and stalking because I don’t have the patience to sit in a blind or stand. If you hunt in the cold and want a comfy, quiet boot, the LL Bean Maine Guide boots are a solid choice. They have a great return and warranty policy, rubber soles are super quiet and allow you to feel the ground you are walking on well so you aren’t snapping twigs and making tons of noise.
 

Flyjunky

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I think Schnees does this? Could be wrong though.
Give Lathrop and Sons a call and explain your situation.

I have no affiliation with them, never owned a pair of their boots but a friend used them who had some difficult foot problems and it turned out great for him. He had gone through kennetrek, Lowa, etc with no success.
 

MSURunner

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Oct 5, 2017
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Billings, MT
Only problem with Danner boots I have had over the decades, is they had some changes on ownership and where things were made, and quality at times was IFFY one some of there lower end boots, but ALL of the higher ends boots like **** from them have been the same quality, or all the pairs I have bought have been!

Danner production on most models is now located in China, even for some of the higher end ones (Pronghorns are now up to $300???) If it has a contoured molded midsole in the Danner lineup, it's pretty much universally made overseas. The Made In USA line is also usually going to tell you such with a little American flag tag on them. Your RF and SRF are both American made. Ironically, so is the "Canadian"!

One thing that you didn't mention, unless I missed it, is the budget. As someone that has sold more than a fair pair of boots, the wide toe box coupled with the different sized feet (unfortunately fairly common), is going to be the most difficult to try to advise on, especially with looking towards a more premium boot. You're definitely going to need to try on a bunch to see how they fit. Lowas and Keens, in my experience, have both had a wider toe boxes, but tend to be below the 8" minimum height. Same for the Salomon Quest 4D recommend as well. Another in that vein is Vasque. I have a very different foot from you, but I've sold all 4 of those to people needing something a bit wider up front and have seen them be happy. I don't know that I would go full Crispi/Kenetrek/Schnee's on a boot that's going to fill an everyday wear role as well. These boots tend to have poly midsoles that are heavier and less forgiving of foot oddities. You might find one that worked for you, but, more likely, you would have to go through a longer break-in period. EVA midsoles found in more of the "hiking" boot lineups will likely be a bit lighter and more forgiving than the poly midsole counterparts. They will also wear a bit quicker as a result, so keep that in mind. The Lowa, Keen, and Vasque boots will often increase their stability with some good rubbered soles and more robust uppers. The Salomon uses a unique polymer chassis to help tie the upper to the sole. It's pretty impressive at what it does. Most of these boots, though, are going to be in the 6-7" height. If you do go with an EVA midsole boot and find one that works for you, I would buy 2 if at all possible. Most manufacturers are updating their lineups every other year, even on popular/well-selling boots. These updates can have a pretty big impact on the fit and you could be going through this process all over again in a couple of years. A polyurethane midsole will likely wear about 2-3 times longer (maybe more if you're lucky!).
 

jbronner13

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May 27, 2022
Messages
370
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Winchester, NH
Danner production on most models is now located in China, even for some of the higher end ones (Pronghorns are now up to $300???) If it has a contoured molded midsole in the Danner lineup, it's pretty much universally made overseas. The Made In USA line is also usually going to tell you such with a little American flag tag on them. Your RF and SRF are both American made. Ironically, so is the "Canadian"!

One thing that you didn't mention, unless I missed it, is the budget. As someone that has sold more than a fair pair of boots, the wide toe box coupled with the different sized feet (unfortunately fairly common), is going to be the most difficult to try to advise on, especially with looking towards a more premium boot. You're definitely going to need to try on a bunch to see how they fit. Lowas and Keens, in my experience, have both had a wider toe boxes, but tend to be below the 8" minimum height. Same for the Salomon Quest 4D recommend as well. Another in that vein is Vasque. I have a very different foot from you, but I've sold all 4 of those to people needing something a bit wider up front and have seen them be happy. I don't know that I would go full Crispi/Kenetrek/Schnee's on a boot that's going to fill an everyday wear role as well. These boots tend to have poly midsoles that are heavier and less forgiving of foot oddities. You might find one that worked for you, but, more likely, you would have to go through a longer break-in period. EVA midsoles found in more of the "hiking" boot lineups will likely be a bit lighter and more forgiving than the poly midsole counterparts. They will also wear a bit quicker as a result, so keep that in mind. The Lowa, Keen, and Vasque boots will often increase their stability with some good rubbered soles and more robust uppers. The Salomon uses a unique polymer chassis to help tie the upper to the sole. It's pretty impressive at what it does. Most of these boots, though, are going to be in the 6-7" height. If you do go with an EVA midsole boot and find one that works for you, I would buy 2 if at all possible. Most manufacturers are updating their lineups every other year, even on popular/well-selling boots. These updates can have a pretty big impact on the fit and you could be going through this process all over again in a couple of years. A polyurethane midsole will likely wear about 2-3 times longer (maybe more if you're lucky!).
This was the most incredibly detailed and helpful post I have ever read on footwear.
 

mrbb

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Joined
Jun 14, 2008
Messages
312
Location
PA
Danner production on most models is now located in China, even for some of the higher end ones (Pronghorns are now up to $300???) If it has a contoured molded midsole in the Danner lineup, it's pretty much universally made overseas. The Made In USA line is also usually going to tell you such with a little American flag tag on them. Your RF and SRF are both American made. Ironically, so is the "Canadian"!

One thing that you didn't mention, unless I missed it, is the budget. As someone that has sold more than a fair pair of boots, the wide toe box coupled with the different sized feet (unfortunately fairly common), is going to be the most difficult to try to advise on, especially with looking towards a more premium boot. You're definitely going to need to try on a bunch to see how they fit. Lowas and Keens, in my experience, have both had a wider toe boxes, but tend to be below the 8" minimum height. Same for the Salomon Quest 4D recommend as well. Another in that vein is Vasque. I have a very different foot from you, but I've sold all 4 of those to people needing something a bit wider up front and have seen them be happy. I don't know that I would go full Crispi/Kenetrek/Schnee's on a boot that's going to fill an everyday wear role as well. These boots tend to have poly midsoles that are heavier and less forgiving of foot oddities. You might find one that worked for you, but, more likely, you would have to go through a longer break-in period. EVA midsoles found in more of the "hiking" boot lineups will likely be a bit lighter and more forgiving than the poly midsole counterparts. They will also wear a bit quicker as a result, so keep that in mind. The Lowa, Keen, and Vasque boots will often increase their stability with some good rubbered soles and more robust uppers. The Salomon uses a unique polymer chassis to help tie the upper to the sole. It's pretty impressive at what it does. Most of these boots, though, are going to be in the 6-7" height. If you do go with an EVA midsole boot and find one that works for you, I would buy 2 if at all possible. Most manufacturers are updating their lineups every other year, even on popular/well-selling boots. These updates can have a pretty big impact on the fit and you could be going through this process all over again in a couple of years. A polyurethane midsole will likely wear about 2-3 times longer (maybe more if you're lucky!).
I will fully agree with your point on if you find something you like, buy two pair, or more
as I cannot tell you how many times, I had something I liked a lot , when they were in need of replacing, there replacements were neither not made any more, or made differently
and this goes fort all things, not just boots

and a second reason to buy two pair of boots, is, that from my experience working and standing on concrete 12+ hrs a day for 20+ yrs, having a second pair of boots and rotating them every other day , allows them time to recover from the none stop pressure on the soles, which doing this for me any how seemed to make boos be a lot more comfortable , and I will also HIGHLY recommend using a boot dryer when NOT weaning your work boots, your feet sweat, and boot dryers work to add yrs of life to your boots

kinda of like what a battery tender does for your vehicles battery HAHA!
and with prices of some boots anymore, , may as well do all you can to make them last!
 

jamie eaton

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Joined
Aug 13, 2022
Messages
36
Location
dewitt mi
I wear a size 14 narrow (b) width. I have had great luck with the Irish Setter Elk Hunters . The 600 gram insulation is not too warm ,but warm enough for winter construction work in Michigan . Midway has them , often on sale.
 

RckyMtnRutt

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Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Messages
125
Location
Boise
You the only one that hikes in to hunt? I do the same thing. I hunt expedition hunts, and I live out west. I hunt about every western state I can get a tag for.

Half my stalks are in socks, branches and rocks are of no concern to me in trail runners…any more than 4-8000ft elevation gain in boots…also not on a trail. Especially by mile 10+

I personally don’t have weak ankles. Even in the military, the mil version of the salomon xa’s were money. I know more guys that rolled ankles in boots then trail runners haha.

Trail runners are lighter. Anyone that hikes knows the benefit to that. They have better traction in general and they breath and drain much faster.

Most trail runners have a rock plate for those concerned about their sensitive feet.

One of best reasons I like the Altra specifically are because of the large toe box. Gives me a better sense of the ground and terrain.
Well not everyone is as tough as you or were in the military.....I just hiked out 2 bull hind quarters from an elk on a pack frame and if it weren't for my lowa's my feet would have been hammered. Not to mention the other trips there and back for more meat. I stalked up on a herd of elk with in 25 yards with my big heavy boots on but to each their own.
 
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