.280 for Moose..??

Discussion in 'How To Hunt Big Game' started by Sully2, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,123
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Hey Sully, I definitely understand why you would not want to go AI. That said, your statement:

    might be a reach. Nosler's data (26" barrel) lists 175 grain partitions maxing at 2760 (highest MV of all powders listed). I have found Nosler's data to be higher than what I can get, even when I handicap myself for a 24" tube. For sake of comparison, Hodgdon's max MV for 175's is 2600fps. Just pointing that out in case that 2800fps you referenced is driving your decision. You might be pushing to get there with 280Rem.

    Good luck layin' down some MOOSE!

    Brandon
     
  2. IDbound

    IDbound Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    147
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2011
    Sully 2: Sorry for you bad experiences with an AI, especially in a 280. I am confident that you are in the minority based on all of the comments from other owners, custom gun builders and the press. Not to mention my own opinion.
     
  3. CapDog

    CapDog Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    207
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    .280 is plenty for moose. I took one of my hunting partners out a couple weeks back and he dropped a 40" bull moose in it's tracks at 284yds with a .260 Rem loaded with 140g Cor-lokt Ultra bonds. The bullet completely passed though on a broadside shot. We've shot a few with 6.5x55's and lots with plane jane .308's

    Loaded with a 140gr premium up to the 175gr regular cup and cores you'll be fine if you put the bullet where it belongs. I'm a fan of the Hornady 154gr offerings, will give you a good balance of speed and BC
     
    Idaho Lefty likes this.
  4. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,036
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Swift A-Frame .284" 175gr BC .493

    If you shoot your bull thru the ribs, broadside, such that the bullet doesn't have to penetrate 12" or more of muscle or gut to get into the boiler room, many bullets will perform adequately in a .280 Rem or higher powered .284 rifle.

    For quartering shots, or other less than ideal positioning of the animal shots where lots of penetration is required to reach the vitals, I'd prefer a heavy for caliber bullet in .308 or .338 caliber.
     
  5. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,836
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Another good bullet.
     
  6. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,480
    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011

    Sane idea I have and am working under..!
     
  7. alaska

    alaska Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Moose rifles in Alaska

    My 3 favorite moose rifles I have?

    300 Weatherby, 300 Win Mag and 338 Win Mag
     
  8. FSU Seminole

    FSU Seminole Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2012
    In my strong humble opinion the 280 is the 3rd best calibur for north american big game in the lower 48 behind the 300 win and 30.06.

    In fact down south the .280 is the absolute perfect deer rifle. Thick woods or big bean fields or shooting across canyons out west the 280 is great round. It shoots flat like a 270 but carries the wallop of an 06.
     
  9. Creedmoor shooter

    Creedmoor shooter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,403
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013



    Amen to that. Really a nice round. Its not quite on par with the 7mm rem mag (which i prefer over the 280) but you dont have to deal with the recoil that the 7mm gives. My brother has shot quite a few deer and coyotes with his a-bolt 280. He loves it and would never sell it. I've actually grow a liking to 6.5mm caliber cartridges though (mainly the 6.5 Creedmoor). The are extremely effective and efficient cartridges.
     
  10. dk17hmr

    dk17hmr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    163
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    I recently shot a cow elk at just over 300 yards with my Remington 700 280 Mountain rifle, with a 160gr Partiton, moving 2825fps out of the 22" barrel.....spent the next day packing that cow and the one my dad shot a couple second earlier out of a pretty terrible valley.

    I don't believe if I were to go on an expensive moose hunt the 280 would make the trip, not that I don't feel it is adequate. I just have a very nice 338 win mag and would likely buy something in the 375 caliber to go with me because I have been wanting a reason to buy one for a long time.

    I don't think you would be under gunned with a 280 and a 160gr Partition, 160gr Accubond, or that new 168gr LR accubond, get them going in the 2800-2850FPS range.
     
  11. sbhooper

    sbhooper Banned

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2013
    I agree. The .280 is plenty for moose. The 160 Partition or Accubond will get the job done just fine.
    You don't need a magnum for moose. You need a bullet that will penetrate.


    I also prefer the 7 mag, but the .280 will do just fine. I am hoping that I can find a cow to deliver a 160 Partition to next month in Wyoming.
     
  12. grovey

    grovey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    186
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    The hornady rn are great old bullets, but i consider them up close a personal type bullets for heavy cover. I'd be leaning towards the 160 gr accubond, or 168 accubond lr. If your a hornady guy the 154 interbond is a great choice as well. All of these buck the wind as well as smash bone as good as the old rn stuff.
     
    Idaho Lefty likes this.
  13. MH WASH

    MH WASH Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    My 11yo son shot a cow moose this fall with a Marlin 7-08 youth and 120 ttsx. Range was 125 and both bullets passed through on a broadside shot.
     
    Idaho Lefty likes this.
  14. grovey

    grovey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    186
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Another great bullet, especially in th 7-08. That's what i plan on feeding my .280 next season for whitetails. Over 300, i'd be looking towards heavier stuff though