10 Ways To Stronger Rifle Field Shooting Positions By Shawn Carlock

Buffalobob

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This should be made into a Sticky in the Basics section (or Advanced section if we had one). It is really good.

I had seen Shawn mention the tree stand step before and not paid much attention. Before I head out west again I will put one in my gear.
 

jmden

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Thank you, Shawn. Another very helpful article with a few more things to think about and try out.
 

Shawn Carlock

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Glad you guys liked it. I hope it helps people not have to start without a clue like I did many years ago. For me field shooting is all that matters. You can get away with alot of imperfections in form at the bench and still shoot well, the field is unforgiving and will bite you in the *** any time it gets a chance.
 

RockyMtnMT

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The bow hanger idea is great. I use the shooting stix all the time. I use them prone by not letting the sections shock cord together. "V" the first sections and let the other two sections on each side just lay on the ground. Works for me, and I don't have to carry the extra weight of the bi-pod.

Thank you for the ideas for field practice.

Steve
 

Eaglet

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Glad you guys liked it. I hope it helps people not have to start without a clue like I did many years ago.
Shawn you are WRONG! We did not like it, we LOVED IT. And it will help a bunch!! Very nicely explained!!!

I, also as BB stated, will be carrying one of those things you call odd gear. :D

I very much enjoyed the example photos, every one of them.

The two photos below I measured the horizontal angle and it happens to be, interesting enough, 34° or the cosine value of 0.83 for both of them, yet you had two different set ups due to the angle of the terrain in front of you.



Thanks for sharing. Great job and info.
 

esshup

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Shawn:

Thanks for an informative article. I normally have a bow hanger in my pack, but never thought of using it that way!

I'm a firm believer in practice makes perfect, but cannot figure out how to practice the angled shots when I live in flat country. Do you have any suggstions? Even shooting an accurate pellet gun at targets in trees would help, but I'm at a loss for targets and how to get them up off the ground.
 

Shawn Carlock

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Esshup,

That is a good question. After you have the angle determined and have computer generated dope (like Exbal) the issue is position. I believe that I would use the air rifle or .22 RF at a short distance like 25 yards or so and work the positions over to see if I get POI shifts due to position. If you have a good validated drop sheet for level, the dope change is very mechanical for angle shooting. "The Issue" is POI effects from your field position. I recommend that you do not try to compensate for POI changes but simply change your position so you don't have them.
 

Wilsonh

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What a great common sense article. The only thing I could add would be that it is a tremendous help to me if I am having to shoot from anything other than the prone position to be able to to get my elbow on something stable. It is not always possible but I sure try to when I can.
 

WildcatB

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Shawn,

Great article. Thanks for posting it. One question. How do you determine the correct length of pull?

Paul
 

MagMan

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Shawn I also agree that it was a great read. Especially on rifle fit.

I for one never thought I had a problem with cheek weld until I purchased some of your adjustable cheek pieces. My shooting is more consistent and I don't have the strange POI changes at distance anymore.

I would also like to hear more about proper LOP.

Thanks
 

esshup

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Shawn:

Thanks for the reply. Good info! I have all the necessary tools, now I just might see if Exbal will work with .177 cal pellet data. I know the gun that I have is consistent and accurate enough to show flaws in my form.

Throw me on the list on people wanting to know how to determine length of pull for a rifle.

Also, can you go into more detail on how I go about getting a good cheek weld? I feel that with all of the factory stocks that I've shot, the stock is too low to be used properly with a scope, especially one with a large objective.
 

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