Sako 75 270 WSM

gei

Active Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2007
Messages
36
Location
Houma, LA
Bought 270 WSM 4 or 5 years ago, shot it for first time this year, shot terrible! Tried factory 3 types, tried different handloads, tried different mounts and 2 scopes. This rifle has the synthetic (tupperware) stock

Contacted Accuflite in Pennsylvania, he said that happens many times with the plastic stock. He said he can put a kevlar stock $800.00 on it and it will shoot.

Has anyone else had this problem with the Sako & plastic stock. I have several sakos and all shoot under 1" with almost anything. This one will not shoot.

thanks
 

EddieHarren

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2005
Messages
1,142
Location
Maryland
I have a customer who has the same rifle. It won't shoot either. I have a McMillan on order for it.
 

cavtrooper94

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
284
Thats too bad. Thats a pretty expensive rifle to have to upgrade right off the bat. The Tikka T3 in 270 WSM shoots great. Personally I'd get a new rifle before buying an $800 stock.
 

Wookie316

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2009
Messages
145
Location
Border City (on the poor side}:-()
Is it a Finnlight? I had a 300 WSM in a Finnlight that didn't shoot good enough for me. It was fine for most, but I like to shoot bug eyes. That rifle stuggled to shoot a MOA at 100yards. I have had many othe Sako 75 S/S that shot very well though.

Seems to be a bad one in every bunch.

For $800 I'd be more inclined to ditch the barrel for a new one. I know in Canada I could have a Ted Gaillard barrel installed for less than that. He is well known up here for building very good barrels.

Gaillard

I have 4 rifles with his barrels & everyone is great.
 

MontanaRifleman

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2008
Messages
6,194
Location
South of Canada and North of Wyoming
Is it a Finnlight? I had a 300 WSM in a Finnlight that didn't shoot good enough for me. It was fine for most, but I like to shoot bug eyes. That rifle stuggled to shoot a MOA at 100yards. I have had many othe Sako 75 S/S that shot very well though.

Seems to be a bad one in every bunch.

For $800 I'd be more inclined to ditch the barrel for a new one. I know in Canada I could have a Ted Gaillard barrel installed for less than that. He is well known up here for building very good barrels.

Gaillard

I have 4 rifles with his barrels & everyone is great.

I also have a Finnlight and if you check out the thread I posted you will see that they do not have a recoil lug. The recoil is transmitted to the stock through the tang of the receiver which is NOT a good set up. The non bedded tupperware stock without pillars is not a good platforn for accuracy and consistancy.

There may be a problem with the barrel, but IMO it is more likely with the stock and/or lack of recoil lug. I would never rebarrel a rifle back into that stock. That would be the same as putting a string of pearls on pig. You still end up with a pig.

My suggestion, fix the stock and recoil problems before rebarreilng. The barrel is very likely to be good and then you have wasted a perfectly good barrel.

Mark
 
Last edited:

EddieHarren

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 27, 2005
Messages
1,142
Location
Maryland
The rifle, that I mentioned in the above post, is not marked "75" anywhere on the rifle. When I went to order the McMillan stock this caused a small problem with the young lady at the order desk. She insisted that it had to be a I, II, or III. When I told her it was not she couldn't accept the order. She finally put me through to the shop and the young man, who answered, was familiar with the model I have, which is an "SM". He said it took the same inlet as the "75".
This action has a recoil lug. It is held in a slot under the front of the action by a set screw. The stock is a ***.
Where ever you are paying $800.00 for a McMillan Sako sporter stock, you need to start buying them from me. I can make you a much better deal.
 

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