New Sleeping Bag

JMack

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Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
529
Looking to add a new sleeping bag to my arsenal. Currently I have an older (19 yrs) Cabela’s synthetic mummy style rated to -30. Its heavy, about 7lbs in stuff sack and it doesn’t compress very small, HOWEVER I have used it to -10/-15 and it does work and dries very fast if damp/wet. My other bag is a North Face 20 (forgot the name) but it works fine for hunts that I’m sleeping in a cabin or similar, its down and very light, compresses very small.

That said, looking to add a lightweight down bag with a 0 or maybe a +5 rating. I’m somewhat of a warm/hot sleeper, but I’d like to reduce weight/size and still have the peace of mind of having a 0 rated bag. I’ve read a good bit about the Western Mountaineering bags, I really can’t justify spending 800$ on a bag that may get used once a year and sometimes every other year depending on the hunt.

My question: is there anything wrong with using something like a Marmot or North Face 0 down bag that saves me 3-3.5lbs in weight and costs half or maybe a little more than half of the WM bags?

Been doing some fly in hunts over last few years and with the weight restrictions I would like to save a few more pounds which will also allow me to bring a spotting scope if necessary.

Thanks
 

JMack

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Feb 20, 2017
Messages
529
Just to add...I’m also not opposed to quilts, never tried one but seems like a viable option to really save some weight.
 

kiwikid

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Oct 21, 2012
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543
Location
New Zealand
A lot of the modern down sleeping bags use down that has been treated so it is water resistant and the shell is made of a water proof material such as Goretex. Bags like these make a huge difference in damp conditions. If you were in NZ I would suggest you look at Macpac as they make fantastic sleeping bags.
 

Hatrick

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Sep 15, 2016
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747
Location
Cape May NJ/ Stuart, Fl
I was always thinking how much is my life and comfort worth if things got bad. You said you have had your old one 19 years so you take care of stuff. That is only $42 a year at $800. Small money when you figure everything else.
 

Shane Lindsey

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Jul 13, 2010
Messages
885
Consider where you hunt. If predominantly wet conditions, may consider a synthetic. Or make sure you have good bivy bag.
0 degrees I wouldn't think a freak "warm" rain would hit you but you never know.

I put together a synthetic quilt for testing purposes. I really like it. It was lightweight compared to the comparable bag. I think it was just as warm. I didn't test it in the super cold though. Just make sure you get the right size if you go that route.
 

wboregon

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Joined
Oct 3, 2017
Messages
124
I'd second using a quilt. really helps me out as a hot sleeper to be able to throw a side open and vent with out dicking with a zipper or having that cold *** zipper touch me while trying to sleep.

hammockgear econ quilts are a pretty good value, Also sierra designs had some good quilt. i bought their 30 degree quilt which ended up having a much higher grade of down than advertised (they have certificates to track the source of the down and report the actual rating of the down used, which mine was closer to 850 than the advertised 700) and has kept me toasty down to about 20 degrees.
 

JMack

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Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
529
The more I read about quilts the more I like the idea. I’m going to try and get some weights on the hammock gear ones. Thanks for the information I appreciate it.
 

Litehiker

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Joined
Sep 15, 2012
Messages
2,394
Location
Mojave Desert, Nevada
THE very best down winter bag I've ever had is the LL Bean -20 F. bag. It comes in Long for storage (water, boot liners, batteries, etc.) in the foot of the bag. Elasticized drawstrings on hood and neck collar W/captive cord ends (easy to find in the dark).
I got it on a ONE DAY double sale in Jan. 2017! What luck. a DWR treated, 750 fill goose down -20 F. bag for $240. Never happen again.

This bag is far better designed than a -20 F. Eddie Bauer down bag that I returned (for poor design). And its quality is equal to the EB bag.

And the best down 3 season bag I've ever had is a Western Mountaineering Megalite 30 F. bag that I had the factory "overstuff" to 20 F. It is going strong after 6 years of 3 season use.

Eric B.
 
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woodsmanlw

Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Messages
24
Looking to add a new sleeping bag to my arsenal. Currently I have an older (19 yrs) Cabela’s synthetic mummy style rated to -30. Its heavy, about 7lbs in stuff sack and it doesn’t compress very small, HOWEVER I have used it to -10/-15 and it does work and dries very fast if damp/wet. My other bag is a North Face 20 (forgot the name) but it works fine for hunts that I’m sleeping in a cabin or similar, its down and very light, compresses very small.

That said, looking to add a lightweight down bag with a 0 or maybe a +5 rating. I’m somewhat of a warm/hot sleeper, but I’d like to reduce weight/size and still have the peace of mind of having a 0 rated bag. I’ve read a good bit about the Western Mountaineering bags, I really can’t justify spending 800$ on a bag that may get used once a year and sometimes every other year depending on the hunt.

My question: is there anything wrong with using something like a Marmot or North Face 0 down bag that saves me 3-3.5lbs in weight and costs half or maybe a little more than half of the WM bags?

Been doing some fly in hunts over last few years and with the weight restrictions I would like to save a few more pounds which will also allow me to bring a spotting scope if necessary.

Thanks
If you are willing to go with 4 pounds a wiggys 0 degree bag will do nicely. I have one and think its great. It doesn't pack down small though (Its ok just not like a North Face 20, which I also have). It also works well when wet.
 

DESERT ED

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
15
I have the Western Mountaineering Ponderosa and I love it. Run it year round. Unzip it and you have a quilt for the summer . If you’re flying in and concerned with weight I’d suggest down and maybe a lighter Western Mountaineering bag. There’s also an outfit in California that specializes in lightweight down bags for backpacking but I can’t remember their name. Good luck
 

dok7mm

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Joined
Apr 13, 2015
Messages
1,773
Location
west texas
I just received a Marmot Lithium 0 bag for a high country backpack hunt. I read a lot of reviews for warm, light weight bags, prior to purchase. I too, have the Cabela's QualiFill synthetic bag, but it is heavier & bulkier than I wanted to pack.

I am pretty impressed with the Marmot bag, though I won't be using it til next week, so I can't comment on warmth yet.
I gave the zippers a good workout and there were no hangups. It came in a large storage bag, so I was leery of getting it in the stuff sack, but it compressed well and fit the sack.
I saved $100 by opting for a left zipper and a long bag. They are on sale at several sites now.
 

RockyMtnMT

Official LRH Sponsor
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
5,786
Location
Montana
I just got a Hyke and Byke 0* down bag. Have been out with it now twice and so far like it very much. Price is right and it is light and compressible. They are a new company and pricing to beat the others.

Steve
 

Mike 338

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Joined
Feb 4, 2012
Messages
1,799
Location
Boise, ID
I recently got a quilt from Enlightened Equipment. As I recall, it was their lowest temperature rated one (0 degrees I think). The down was treated to be somewhat resistant when wet. I tried it in a hammock the last couple weekends. I also used a 20 degree underquilt from Outdoor Vitals. I was pretty warm but it really wasn't to cold at night. I'm going to give this system a try this hunting season. They also sell a very nice down hood which I got but haven't had any need to use it. If you use a quilt, you'll want something to keep you nogg'in warm if the temperature drops. If your on the ground, a "great pad" and a good quilt should be plenty warm. I did notice that a hammock/tarp system more or less weighs about the same as a good lightweight tent/sleeping bag system but the hammock system packs down very nicely inside the backpack without taking up much space. I noted the hammock produced no stress on my hips, unlike sleeping on the ground, however, I did get some stress on my shoulders. Could be the way I hung it and frankly, it's not to fancy of a hammock. I noted that the cost of a good down quilt compares very well or better, to a similarly rated down bag. A quilt is more like what your used to in your bed, with more freedom of movement. I haven't made my final assessment yet but so far, I like the quilt.
 
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