How cold is too cold?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by emn83, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. emn83

    emn83 Well-Known Member

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    So, after doing the load testing with my rifle, and the results were pretty good. However, I am wondering, since I had been using used brass, if I might have been seeing pressure signs that were from older load testing. Because of this, I am going to do another test, see if the max load is where I think it is, with new brass.

    So, after a long introduction, it's Northern Minnesota and winter....the temps are only reaching the mid 20s and I am concerned that I might not get valid results because of the temp. I have a string of 10 different loads to try. Is it worth it go go and load, or is it too cold?
     
  2. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    What conditions do you normally use it in?

    I'm trying out 180gr hybrid in my 7mag, the barrel has 1 in 10 twist Berger recommends 1 in 9, but according to every calc, app, ect. I look at I should be able to stabilize it here, so I'm going to do my load workup now during winter when conditions theoretically should be not in my favor for this bullet, if it stabilizes then I should have a reasonable certainty that it would be fine the rest of the year.

    I spose that's just another way of going about it.
     
  3. 375fan

    375fan Well-Known Member

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    emn83,
    Max loads developed in cold weather may be too hot in warm weather. You may have to redo load test when weather warms up. Shouldn't see much difference between new or used brass, unless it is in real bad shape. Biggest thing will be neck tension on old brass as multiple firings will make it brittle requiring annealing.
     
  4. emn83

    emn83 Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the replies...weather just turned even colder...decided to wait till spring. I have good data to do some figuring with now, and there is a rumor of a chronograph coming my way, so the wait should be worth it. I'm pleased with the loads I have right now, just want to validate my max load data....if there's another node higher up, and my rifle can handle it, I'd want to test that against what I have found. Again thanks.
     
  5. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    howdy-- just a bit up-wind of you here. I'm with the others that you should re-test in the spring when it warms up. You can get really close though if you already know the rifle likes the bullet and you don't push it anywhere red-line-- so to speak. I'd go to about mid-load personally.
    I've done a bunch of load developement in cold weather because that's when we hunt critters up here; it only makes sense. Don't put a cold weather red-line load in the chamber in 100 degree weather and expect it to be a good thing.
     
  6. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    On the back of my contaner there is a ph# and the guy can tell and ask him about load and if the powder in question is extreme. They are a big help but they have no coupons to save a few bucks thats a bummer.
     
  7. JackinSD

    JackinSD Well-Known Member

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    Not really useful information. Whether it is an extreme powder or not, testing will still need to be done. He is looking for max loads.

    Secondly, no need to waste time on the phone. Just look at the container. It will say extreme powder right on it, if it is.
     
  8. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

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    Right on jackinSD.