Help in buying new reloading equipment

ford32

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I started reloading in 87-92 in the Army (Germany) I loaded pistol.. A low life broke into my house and stole all my old stuff. I decided to get back into it, but I will be loading rifle 6.5x55, 7mm, 300wm, 06.. I have collect dies that I had in my pawpaw house.. Any recommendations welcomed.
 

65WSM

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Buy Wilson seating dies. They are inexpensive and more accurate at seating than threaded dies. Be sure to get the VLD stem on whatever you buy. You will not be shooting Core-loks or PowerPoints so you will need a VLD stem in whatever you buy or you will be seating by pushing the tip instead of the ogive.

For sizing I will bet that you can use Wilson seating dies for 90 percent of your reloading. You can use the bushings to tune your grip on the bullet. The Wilson size die will size half of the neck and leave the base of the neck chamber diameter to center the bullet. If you need to move a shoulder because you are running HOT, then my favorite shoulder pusher is the Forster "shoulder bump dies". Forster dies are less expensive than Redding ( I have 11 sets of Redding "S" bushing dies) and as good or better but Redding are available for more calibers.

I have thousands of dollars of bushings. The Wilson bushings are the cheapest and just as good or better than the most expensive titanium carbide offerings.
 

scrmblr1982cj8

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I have mostly RCBS equipment since there are a few shops around here that stock their stuff. I have no complaints about the RCBS equipment I have on hand.
 

BountyHunter

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Couple points

1. Wilson seating dies are very good seater but generally not for starting to relaod. However they are certainly not cheap at $50 for non micrometer and $100 for micrometer.

2. Also they would require a larger magnum size arbor press along with a standard 7/8 press for the 300 WM.

3. Claiming to be able to use a seater die as a sizer is in the same category of the people that claim you can use a chamber reamer to make a sizer die. Flat out does not work and run like hell from misinformation like that for reference. Sorry but fact.

Pick up a good solid steel reloading press. You can buy used or new. I have two rockchuckers and one is 40 years old and I can load from 17 hornets to 408 cheytac cases. Do not pick a progressive starting out. Too difficult to learn on and too easy to make a serious mistake as the are not for inexperienced reloaders.

Quality beam scale RCBS 10-10 is ideal. Later you can go digital of some type.

Bushing dies are your best bet if it is a case you are trying for max accuracy. Go with redding bushing dies if you are doing that. RCBS, Hornady and Forester Bonanza also have good dies.

You will need a quality caliper, case trimmer, powder trickler, powder thrower etc plus vibrating case cleaner and assorted case tools for primer pockets etc.

Hornady headspace comparator will be needed for measuring and setting headspace.

I always keep a case holder with each set of dies as they can vary as much as .010 between them.

Google "Shooters Corner" and look at "The List" of equipment then call Bob White as he has tons of used reloading equipment and can save you a bunch if money. Tell him what you are doing and let him help you with dies and everything.
 

65WSM

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You did not read carefully. I addressed seating first then sizing.

Seating First:
I do not find a Micrometer useful. The threads on the standard cap and stem are precision enough. I use the calibrated shims (Skip's Shims) for fine adjustments.

I use an arbor press that I found at a swap meet. Harbor Freight has new ones for under $150. I have a portable K&M for adjustments at the range, but it has been years since I used it.

Sizing:
I would urge you to purchase a used threaded or Bonanza press as well if you need to push shoulders. The pre-Chinese RCBS Rockchuckers are better and I bet that is the case for the other brands. You may find that you do not push shoulders or maybe another shooter at your range will push shoulders on his press when that is necessary.
 

65WSM

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Messages
518
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You did not read carefully. I addressed seating first then sizing.

Seating First:
I do not find a Micrometer useful. The threads on the standard cap and stem are precision enough. I use the calibrated shims (Skip's Shims) for fine adjustments.

I use an arbor press that I found at a swap meet. Harbor Freight has new ones for under $150. I have a portable K&M for adjustments at the range, but it has been years since I used it.

Sizing:
I would urge you to purchase a used threaded or Bonanza press as well if you need to push shoulders. The pre-Chinese RCBS Rockchuckers are better and I bet that is the case for the other brands. You may find that you do not push shoulders or maybe another shooter at your range will push shoulders on his press when that is necessary.
 

65WSM

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Here is an example of VLD seating stems. In this case Berger hunting bullets are placed in a standard and VLD seating stem. You can see that the bullet leans over in the standard stem. Whatever dies you buy you will need VLD seating stems and these are not a shelf item for many dies new or used. Make sure that you can replace the issue stems with VLD stems in whatever brand.
 

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BountyHunter

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For sizing I will bet that you can use Wilson seating dies for 90 percent of your reloading.

I did read correctly, maybe you did not write correctly! That does say use seating dies for sizing!!!!!

Still say you wrote it incorrectly and it was wrong info, much less not even applicable for rookie reloader, plus more expensive than standard seating dies for a rookie. Just because you do something a certain way as an experienced reloader does not make it applicable for a new reloader.

Let them get the basics and experience first.

Plus If you really want to get it right, a harbor freight arbor press at $150 is not a good buy to say the least. The real advantage to inline dies now and arbor presses is the ability to feel or now to even measure seating force. Here is the one to buy if you want to get technical and do it right. However, over the head of a rookie reloader at this stage.

Hydro Bullet Seater


I know it works to help master neck tension and seating pressure.

Yes, Skip Otto shims are great on both inline and 7/8 dies but not needed for a rookie at this point, plus you did not explain it.

Read the question and understand the knowledge level first.
 

HarryN

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Jul 14, 2013
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There are a lot of reloading items that could potentially be replaced with a decent lathe. If you have machinist capability, it might be worth considering at least some preparation using that method.
 
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