>>>>>Going Wolf Hunting in Idaho/Montana.... or BUST<<<<<

daniel brothers

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Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
303
Location
Santee , south carolina usa
>>>>>Going Wolf Hunting in Idaho/Montana.... or BUST<<<<<

You Guys have seen my threads about wanting places to hunt coyote, but after learning more about the wolf problem in Idaho as well as other Western States... my focus has changed. I understand the problem wolves are causing to ranchers, but what really BURNS me is what they are doing to the Big Game. I'm not going to be focused on trying to get some kind of trophy...NOPE... I want to help level the playing field against this threat.... which is getting worse by the minute. I have the time and the money to dive right into the middle of this mess and say..." Here I am.. what can I do to help" But before I take off half cocked, I thought I'd start a thread for any helpful tips or suggestions. Thanks Guys....Dan
 
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dogz

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Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
688
Location
SWMT
IME, as much as anything the right access is important and can be as tough as it is for good elk hunting....odd I know but true

Snow depth can be problematic, as can getting around in their winter country. They have big *** ranges so be prepared to cover lots of ground, either on sleds or via foot.

IMO, very few are actually taken when hunting them, most are taken during the hunt season while people are hunting elk etc.

Calling can work, but it's no magical cure. I've called in 2 packs of them, unfortunately both were prior to being to light them up. On the 2nd group, I could of trippled and that is on my all time dream list is to do a trip via calling on canus lupis:)

Who knows, maybe Christmas will come early for me this year and I'll get my trip...
 

Troutslayer2

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Joined
May 28, 2010
Messages
450
I’m no expert but I have wolf encounters every year. If I were specifically going to hunt them I would look for ungulates. I have seen elk hunters abandon a basin because they run into wolves. Um, yeah, there are wolves there because there are elk there.

Several times I have glassed packs on recent kills, one I just straight up saw wolves on a fresh kill and another time I saw birds which led me to a kill and I will tell you the mistake I made that time. I saw all these birds hanging around so I went over to inspect the spot. There was an elk carcass mostly picked clean, wolf tracks all over the place but there didn’t seem to be a bite of meat left on it. I dedicated half the morning to sitting on that kill and when nothing showed up I started second guessing it, thinking there was nothing left, they had moved on. So I adjusted my position to much farther away to get more views of vast terrain instead of just this little area, but I could still somewhat see it. About an hour after I did that I saw 2 wolves running towards that kill and by the time I could get over there they were no longer there. Had I sat that out for a while longer I would have got a shot. So I would say if you find a kill even if it looks like there is no food left on it, it might be worth giving it a day.
 

DSheetz

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Joined
Aug 22, 2015
Messages
1,574
Daniel , You will find that most of the land and livestock owners have trappers and hunters that have worked for them several years so they don't let very many new people in to hunt so they don't take the chance of messing up the predator hunting and trapping for their usual guys . It's a respect thing for each other . The ranchers want dead predators not selective shots so any time you have a good shot at 25 yards and pass it up because you don't want to shoot any thing under 700 yards you have made an educated animal for the regular predator hunter they have working for them that keep their livestock alive . I worked for well over 35 years as a predator control guy and have had to take so many animals that were educated by others and know how hard it made life for me and the rancher . The guys that make their livings with livestock know this and they show respect to the guys that have to kill the killers for them . So get some good maps , information from the Game and Fish depts. of the states you think you may want to hunt in as to where ,when and what type of permits you will need . Then be respectful and considerate of all the people that have to make their living in those states with livestock . There are a lot of part time predator hunters in this world , they enjoy doing it and can and do it with out causing the others undue hard ships . Just take the time to think out what it is you are doing before you do it and know what it will do to others if you do it without thinking before you act .
 

rooster740

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Joined
Feb 13, 2008
Messages
567
Location
Paradise Valley montana
Don’t let some of these comments get you deterred or side tracked into not hunting! Go hard and learn!
In my pursuit of these mutts here is some advice. It’s not set in stone, just my findings for my area.
I hunt wolves some years seriously and some not, but if a new guy comes in and kills a wolf it’s atta boy time. Most guys will say it’s 96% luck, and 4% luck. It’s hard work and always learning by mistakes. These buggers will humble you!
Cover a bunch of ground in a vehicle looking for wolf tracks. In the process find some public ground without gray area access that has a bunch of elk or deer.
If you notice the elk or deer gone or uncharacteristically displaced spend some serious time on glass. Having a dog with you in my opinion is a must. Like a decoy that gives you a few more seconds on a spooked wolf and peeks their curiosity when you are just out hunting.
Non threatened wolves will often be on a high lookout, rock or knob early morning. They very often use draws and cooleys for travel routes, hunt at night and are bedded down during the day. Calling May work but has not for me for 10 years because they are educated. In September early October a pup or kick off yearling will come to a call. Howling can located them but gives you away also!
Threatened wolves will stay high and hunt deer in the timber until the food source is snowed or killed out.
You have a half hour in the morning and evening to really catch them. Calling just gives your presence away.
They are ghosts but being out there is better then not.
If you find an area with wolves stay far away but in rifle range from their travel routes or kills. They are probably watching or have seen you, and will be long gone for a while.
If you figure out one morning that you are in the area where 2 packs have came together it is an amazing thing! Howling works! They are vocal all day and very aggressive.
Most shots will be a trotting wolf that stops momentarily or sitting looking at you.
They are lots of hair! A sitting wolf looks 2 feet wide but has a kill zone about 4” wide and just a slight breeze will blow it!
 

Mram10us

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
3,706
Location
Idaho
Great time of year to use a snow machine to go after them. I am still amazed at how big they are and how they disappear even when no cover seems to be there. Best of luck, Sir
 

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