Getting scope crosshairs straight?

Alibiiv

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Being on the forum so long and with the wealth of information I know someone will have an answer. This ought to be pretty straight forward, however I am not certain about the outcome of the process that I am using.

Presently I am using EXD Engineering "One Hole Groups" scope alignment tool from Brownells. Essentially two sliding v-blocks with a level on top. This tool aligns the center line of the scope with the bore of the rifle. I am using a Tipton gun vise that I tape the rifle into once it is leveled. From there I align the scope rings with a piece of green tape that I leveled and put on the garage door about 40 feet away; and that tape is level I checked it twice. Once the cross hairs are aligned I tighten the scope down, and check to make sure everything is aligned. However..............when I shoulder the rifle, I am finding the scope to be crooked. The question is it me holding the rifle improperly or am I missing something with the alignment. I have been thinking about investing in a Wheeler system, however the One Hole Groups system seems to be pretty fool-proof, but..................maybe not as fool proof as I thought! I'd appreciate other's input/opinions.
 
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kchandler911

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Houston Tx
Being on the forum so long and with the wealth of information I know someone will have an answer. This ought to be pretty straight forward, however I am not certain about the outcome of the process that I am using.

Presently I am using a "One Hole Groups" scope alignment tool. Essentially two sliding v-blocks with a level on top. This tool aligns the center line of the scope with the bore of the rifle. I am using a Tipton gun vise that I tape the rifle into once it is leveled. From there I align the scope rings with a piece of green tape that I leveled and put on the garage door about 40 feet away; and that tape is level I checked it twice. Once the cross hairs are aligned I tighten the scope down, and check to make sure everything is aligned. However..............when I shoulder the rifle, I am finding the scope to be crooked. The question is it me holding the rifle improperly or am I missing something with the alignment. I have been thinking about investing in a Wheeler system, however the One Hole Groups system seems to be pretty fool-proof, but..................maybe not as fool proof as I thought! I'd appreciate other's input/opinions.
The bottom of your turret housing should have a flat spot. If you also have a flat surface on the top of your action below the turrets, you can slide a narrow steel ruler between the bottom of the turret housing and top of the action and rotate it until it touches both. If it isn’t flat across the bottom of your turret housing and top of the action, the scope isn’t level. If you have solid contact on both, you’re canting your rifle which is more common than you can imagine.
 

pttp

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Oct 11, 2017
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Tightening the ring screws is rotating the scope, so when you shoulder the rifle the scope is not plumb. Some rings are worse than others. Tightening the screws in various sequences will help to counter the rotation, including the front & rear screws in the sequence.
There are wedges that prevent the scope from rotating, used in a similar manner as the ruler method previously mentioned by kchandler911.
 

Ace Quackhunter

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When you go to the range set a plumb bob at 25 yards and use a bubble level attached to your rifle to square it first. Then square your scope to the plumb bob and slowly tighten the screws. With out touching the rifle verify both are square and then shoulder your rifle and verify again. If not square when you shoulder your rifle you may be canting the stock left or right. This is a big issue at long distance and I had a problem doing that at 1,000 yards and I have a bubble level on my rifle that I verify before ever shot.
Ace
 

Alibiiv

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It's you. I use a tool like that to align the scope and rifle with gravity. The tool and gravity dont lie
Thanks for the reply. I kept saying the same thing to myself, however still questioned it. I have to be canting the rifle when it gets shouldered. I cannot use the ruler method because it is a Ruger with integral mounts and nothing flat to make the comparison. I also have the Wheeler lapping kit that comes with a level for the top of the scope turret, however that is a very small surface and not very accurate.
 

ShtrRdy

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Thanks for the reply. I kept saying the same thing to myself, however still questioned it. I have to be canting the rifle when it gets shouldered. I cannot use the ruler method because it is a Ruger with integral mounts and nothing flat to make the comparison. I also have the Wheeler lapping kit that comes with a level for the top of the scope turret, however that is a very small surface and not very accurate.
It's possible that you're holding the gun level and tilting your head to get your eye behind the scope. If you're going to use this rifle for long range get a bubble level that attaches to the scope. Use a plumb line to get the vertical crosshair laying on top of the plumb line while you attach the bubble level. Then you'll be able to determine if you're tilting the rifle or your head.
 

jdyoung

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When the rifle is all set up in the vise and you have leveled it and the scope as stated in #1, can you check if the butt pad/plate is plumb ?

Is that a Ruger 77 with a flat bottom receiver ?
 
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Laguna Freak

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Jan 5, 2015
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South Central Texas, just north of the Wall
Being on the forum so long and with the wealth of information I know someone will have an answer. This ought to be pretty straight forward, however I am not certain about the outcome of the process that I am using.

Presently I am using EXD Engineering "One Hole Groups" scope alignment tool from Brownells. Essentially two sliding v-blocks with a level on top. This tool aligns the center line of the scope with the bore of the rifle. I am using a Tipton gun vise that I tape the rifle into once it is leveled. From there I align the scope rings with a piece of green tape that I leveled and put on the garage door about 40 feet away; and that tape is level I checked it twice. Once the cross hairs are aligned I tighten the scope down, and check to make sure everything is aligned. However..............when I shoulder the rifle, I am finding the scope to be crooked. The question is it me holding the rifle improperly or am I missing something with the alignment. I have been thinking about investing in a Wheeler system, however the One Hole Groups system seems to be pretty fool-proof, but..................maybe not as fool proof as I thought! I'd appreciate other's input/opinions.
If I was doing what you are and still had doubts about my alignment of scope : bore : self, I would add a plumb line to my process to align the vertical when setting the scope. There are a few methods and a search on LRH and other sites will yield something effective for you. I use a brass plumb-bob.

Once you eliminate all reasonable potential for scope : bore misalignment, the only variable left is the shooter. Astigmatism and other vision impairments can be a huge factor. So is shooting form misalignment which can be improved with perfect practice.
 

letzhunt

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It is very typical to cant the rifle upon shouldering it....especially when standing. Shooting from a bench its an easy fix. Its not a big deal as the ranges you shoot standing you won't notice it. When shooting from a bench its easy to use a level and your bag or bipod to address it. I have tried a lot of different tools and methods and have found the best is the plumb bob method. I use bright orange cord about the size of a round boot lace and hang it at 75 to 100 yards. with a small weight to hold it plumb. I then carefully hold the cord still and tape it down so the wind doesn't move it at all. Getting the rifle straight is the difficult part depending on your action type. I tend to mount the rifle to my shoulder several times and note the cant.....very seldom does the rifle end up straight.....but it is the consistency that your looking for.....If you keep shouldering your rifle with a little cant then make the scope level with that cant because you will still cant it that way when you shoulder it. It is always a great idea to have a level on your scope or rifle because in the field it is very easy to cant the rifle especially on a hillside
holding the rifle or clamping it have a buddy rotate the scope until the orange cord is covered by the vertical reticle. I also hold the reticle so it is just to one side of the cord then check that its the same distance at the top and the bottom. slightly tighten the ring screws alternating across and front to back. I do one ring first then do the other. It works great
 

Alibiiv

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When the rifle is all set up in the vise and you have leveled it and the scope as stated in #1, can you check if the butt pad/plate is plumb ?

Is that a Ruger 77 with a flat bottom receiver ?
It's a Ruger 77/22 and the bottom where the magazine is flat, that might work with a flat piece of steel and a level. Although this is a 77/22 I am also experiencing this with my other Ruger 77 tang safety rifles. I suspect that it is me canting my head to pick the scope up. I'm concerned about getting the cross hairs parallel with the centerlines of the scope and the bore, that's the purpose of the "One Hole Groups" tool.
 

1894C

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I built a concrete bench and hung orange weed eater string with a 10 pound standard weight tied to the end. Between a perfectly level bench, bipod, rear bag, and gravity, I have no issues.

For my LR Rigs after I have sighted the rifle in and leveled the scope, I give them 30 MOA and shoot a three shot group at 100 yards. Requires a lot of cardboard but in a couple hours it’s set. Then we move over to the other side of the farm and start stretching their legs
 

Barrelnut

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OP, pretty sure you are using the tool below. I use it also. If the scope rings are not dead nuts on top of the receiver and you have to tilt the stock left or right to get the scope bell perfectly over the barrel, then the stock itself is not straight on your shoulder or palm of your hand and you tend to tilt the rifle so the stock is correct.
If that is happening, don't use the tool, just level the stock to your world and then align the crosshairs to a plum bob, like mentioned above and it will probably resolve the issue.

1596332087793.png
 

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