Does anyone make premium brass for the 264 WM?

Mike Matteson

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Mots times when I see people do this they go in steps. .375, .338, .308, and .264 or something like this. Don't know for sure though, I have never done it
Maybe 416 to start with? I hadn't thought of 375 die either. That would help. I have sized 300WM to 308 Norma Mag cases, and 30/06, 270 to 25/06 cases in one step. Be sure to lube, but not to heavy.
 

Mike from Texas

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Maybe 416 to start with? I hadn't thought of 375 die either. That would help. I have sized 300WM to 308 Norma Mag cases, and 30/06, 270 to 25/06 cases in one step. Be sure to lube, but not to heavy.
Sounds like wayyyyy more trouble and expense than it’s worth. If I had to buy multiple dies, make multiple sizing passes and potentially lose a few cases just doesn’t sound appealing at all.
 

Mike Matteson

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Sounds like wayyyyy more trouble and expense than it’s worth. If I had to buy multiple dies, make multiple sizing passes and potentially lose a few cases just doesn’t sound appealing at all.
It's all depend on what you are after. I am in the process of getting bushing dies, and several for the same case but used in different rifles that are chamber a little different for all my rifles and sons rifles. Yes it will cost. The reason for that is I don't want to change the setting for that case for that rifle. Belted magnum cases are all about the same except for the caliber you are shooting.
I already have response from Redding on Basic Belted Magnum cases from Peterson Brass asking for more info about what I reload. I have responded to them this morning.
I believe that the bushing die you are using if using, you would only have to change out the bushing to achieve that final desired case sizing for that caliber. That's why I have written to Redding about this.
 

FEENIX

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Sounds like wayyyyy more trouble and expense than it’s worth. If I had to buy multiple dies, make multiple sizing passes and potentially lose a few cases just doesn’t sound appealing at all.
Agreed! They are called wildcat tubes for a reason and are definitely not for everybody and occasion. However, it is worth it because I already have everything I need for the intended application.
 

Mike from Texas

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Agreed! They are called wildcat tubes for a reason and are definitely not for everybody and occasion. However, it is worth it because I already have everything I need for the intended application.
That makes sense. If it could be accomplished with say a 300 Win Mag bushing die and finish with the 264WM die I may be interested because I have Redding competition dies in 300 WM and full length bushing die for the 264 WM.
 

Mike Matteson

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I think is worth a try.
I would think that just changing out the bushing would work if you already have a 300WM bushing die. I would think that you would have to get larger bushing to start the process and move down to the correct size. Attached it the detail on the common belted magnum case. I am waiting for a response for Redding. I will share when I get it.
 

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Mike from Texas

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I would think that just changing out the bushing would work if you already have a 300WM bushing die. I would think that you would have to get larger bushing to start the process and move down to the correct size. Attached it the detail on the common belted magnum case. I am waiting for a response for Redding. I will share when I get it.
Since my Redding 300WM dies are competition dies, there is a neck only die and then a body die. Not sure how that would work. I think you would crush the brass by using the body die as it would try to create the shoulder and take the neck from roughly .535 down to .335’ish.
With the bushing die it would need to step down incrementally to a point and then possibly finish with the body die.
But again with the brass costing $2 per piece after shipping and tax plus experimenting with many bushings, for me I’m not sure it’s worth the effort. You will still have to fireform it to get everything concentric.
I dunno, just thinking out loud.
 
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