Depriming live primers

ronstone09

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Jan 21, 2010
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350
Location
portland, oregon
I made the mistake of seating some primers to deep. I have never deprimed live primers and want to know what the safe way to do this is. I actually did not realize you could actually seat primers to deep until now. Can you safely run them back through your sizing die or is there a better way to do this? Thanks for any info
ive done it many times, clean your primer catcher on your press then carefully punch them out just like a spent primer , no problem then reseat them !
 

JAM07Sport

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Aug 6, 2013
Messages
14
It could be the primers. I had used Remington 9.5m exclusively for large rifle magnums with no issue for years. I noticed Hogdon had the 7.5 listed on a load I was going to try. I picked up a brick and had 2 issues one they set deep in the pocket but not as bad as yours. 2nd issue 3 of them went off in my rcbs hand primer in the first 100 pack. After my ear stopped ringing I called Remington. They pretty much told me I did not know what I was doing. So after 27yrs of reloading and never having that happen. I am back to CCI, Federal and Winchester. I am not sure if Remington is having quality issues or what. But I pushed 950 CCI 450 the same night in the same tool in the same brass and not one of them went off.
 

okie man

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Dec 21, 2013
Messages
903
Why go through the danger and trouble too remove them? You gonna stick them back in ? How many out of how many cases turned out like that? Its just hornady 223 brass ! Not worth the effort ! Pretty obviously brass is junk. Pop them and send them back and get some brass with better quality!
 

J E Custom

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Jul 29, 2004
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10,720
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Texas
The reason I recommend extending the primer de-caper pin is to avoid the pressure that the primer can produce and direct the gasses downward in a safe direction. I have been loading over 50 years and have never had a primer go off during de-capping and don't want the first time. they are strong enough to jam a bullet in the rifling and I have removed these from barrels that were lacking a powder charge so I know how hard they can jam the bullet when everything is sealed by the case.

I don't know if it could damage the press or injure the re-loader but again I don't want to find out. I have seen and heard about it happening and the results were not good, so better safe than sorry. I personally don't like spraying anything in the case that might contaminate powder later even if it is solvent cleaned, so I take special care when de-capping primers.

Just Me

J E CUSTOM
 

Capt Kurt

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Joined
Sep 10, 2009
Messages
32
I made the mistake of seating some primers to deep. I have never deprimed live primers and want to know what the safe way to do this is. I actually did not realize you could actually seat primers to deep until now. Can you safely run them back through your sizing die or is there a better way to do this? Thanks for any info
From your picture it looks like you have a batch on bad brass. Just slowly punch out the primer and contact Hornady and Show them your picture
 

HOT TUNA

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Apr 14, 2016
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51
Location
Minnesota
That picture of the primer seated to deep... looks like the case head has been flattened pretty good. A pressure sign from too hot of a charge. A high pressure event could have also changed the primer pocket dimensions. If it were me I would throw that piece of brass out.
 

okie man

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Dec 21, 2013
Messages
903
That picture of the primer seated to deep... looks like the case head has been flattened pretty good. A pressure sign from too hot of a charge. A high pressure event could have also changed the primer pocket dimensions. If it were me I would throw that piece of brass out.
pretty sure they are new out of the box cases!
 

pburton

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Jun 2, 2012
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Reno, NV
That picture of the primer seated to deep... looks like the case head has been flattened pretty good. A pressure sign from too hot of a charge. A high pressure event could have also changed the primer pocket dimensions. If it were me I would throw that piece of brass out.

This was brand new brass. I primed about 10 cases before I realized there was a problem.
 

pburton

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Why go through the danger and trouble too remove them? You gonna stick them back in ? How many out of how many cases turned out like that? Its just hornady 223 brass ! Not worth the effort ! Pretty obviously brass is junk. Pop them and send them back and get some brass with better quality!

That is exactly my plan at this point.
 

okie man

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Dec 21, 2013
Messages
903
I processed 250 hornady 6.5 creed cases just a few days ago. Some required just a quick push on the primer pocket uniformer to get a nice square and consistent depth .some I had too clean shavings 2 and 3 times before I got the same depth! Even after trimming, chamfering and cutting pockets I had a 8 grain weight difference in the 250 cases. Not top quality stuff. No surprise too get some with primer pockets too deep
 

ar10ar15man

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Aug 22, 2018
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883
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az
.005 is NOT "They have extremely tight tolerances."

I found this issue interesting so i spot checked all 3 cartridges I load. NONE look anything close to yours. I'd have to agree with others here that those primer pockets are way too deep. These are mine: 1) .308 Win, 2) 300 WinMag, 3) .45ACP. I use only Nosler brass. They have extremely tight tolerances. For example case mouth runout under .005". Thats tight. Yours might fire like they are shown but that has to affect accuracy. Id try to return them.View attachment 128889 View attachment 128890 View attachment 128888
 
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