Chasing the lands.

J E Custom

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Jul 29, 2004
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Why not start at the short end and let the barrel grow thru the node? Seems like you may never have to adjust seating depth that way? Maybe I'm looking at it wrong?

The concept is to find the lands when the barrel is new and back off to find the node. Once accuracy starts to deteriorate, normally seating two or 3 thousandths longer will bring accuracy back safely.

J E CUSTOM
 

jmcmath

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who is that guy ?
Your explanation JE is better than his.
 

Plinker147

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Feb 7, 2015
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I get what he is saying, but using his method he is finding out where the lans are he just isn't measuring it. In order to get to his "safe" place -.020 and not a jammed place you have to know where the jammed place is.

I use a Sinclair knuckle compariter with their there measuring tool to find my lans or jam measurement. The way the tool operates it really gives you a slight jam measurement since there is no way to drop or push a bullet into your lans without creating some jam.

I feel the same that the only measurement that matters is the measurement where your rifle shoots good. As long as you can reload to that measurement your golden and no need to chase your lans unless your accuracy falls.

Great video, great tips, thanks for posting
 

MagnumManiac

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Feb 25, 2008
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I used to believe chasing the lands was the go as well, for now if accuracy drops away, which usually happens at about 300 round intervals in my comp guns, I simply run the chrony and discover the velocity has dropped and increase the charge until the velocity is back and the node is nearly always at that velocity, regardless of jump distance.
Even when I set-back and re-chamber, I try and find that velocity node.

I’m hoping my new 6.5 SAUM is not going to have as much throat erosion as my 264WM’s have. My 6.5x47 has virtually zero throat erosion at 683 rounds down, very little haze cracking either.

Cheers.
 

Jud96

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Tip Top of West Virginia
In my opinion and experience, the Wheeler method of finding the “lands” is the best way. I’ve tried using the Hornady tool and the Sinclair tool and I get much better feel, better repeatability, and have much better confidence in using the Wheeler method. I’ll link a video to it below. As far as chasing lands, when something stops shooting good and everything else remains the same, then just bump your bullet out a little until you regain accuracy. For a hunting rifle I don’t see this being a huge concern because they’re not shot hundreds of times in a weekend and thus don’t wear out twice a year. As a responsible hunter, I practice year round with my rifles and when it comes hunting season I double check my zero, muzzle velocity, and the accuracy of my rifle. If something isn’t right, I don’t panic, I check the basics, clean the barrel, foul the barrel and see what happens. If it doesn’t shoot well and it doesn’t have a high round count, I would just adjust the seating depth. Some people chase lands, others wait until it stops shooting good and they go from there. I like to set stuff up and run it as long as I can. So I only fix what’s broke when it’s broke, just my opinion. I usually like Erik’s videos and posts on other forums, but in this video I think he was a little obnoxious or something about finding the lands.
 

J E Custom

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Like most, I have a different method and philosophy to reach the desired seating but both ways shone will get you there fairly accurately. I do have different requirements than some, and have reasons for these requirements.

I rely on true measurements not feel. The instruments don't lie or have a reason to.
First, I don't use a bullet more than once or twice for any measurement that applies force of any kind because it can deform the bullet slightly and give false readings. (When you jam the bullet in the chamber using the bolt some deformation of the bullet jacket will take place. Although slight, it is still not representative of the new bullets in the un-fired form. For true accuracy, the base to Ogive must be measured on each bullet. If these dimensions vary, problems can occur if the bullets are jammed into the lands because of the differences bullet to bullet. Most methods will get you off the lands for safety, but How much, is what I am looking for.

Like many things in this sport, very few agree on everything or every aspect of someones method. most methods shone will keep you off the lands if measured/performed properly as in the video.
I rarely agree with everything on most videos, but many have merit and can help someone just getting started.

I am trying to put together a video my self on this and show the method I prefer to use that can/will give me precise measurements with each type of bullet that will be used in a particular rifle/chamber and record all of the measurements for that chamber. I find that if I do a better job of measuring in the beginning, it is easier to find that accuracy node.

The one thing that I definitely don't ever do is jam the bullet into the lands and prefer to not touch them ether because of the slight differences in bullets. I find that if best accuracy is in this state, changing the load can/will solve this and keep you much safer and trouble free.

Being off the lands is the safest, how much is an individual thing. In many cases this kind of precision loading is/may not be necessary or even measurable for some, so take it for what it is worth. If I can squeeze .010 thousandths more out of a load, I will but in many cases it is not necessary, so as long as the load performs for the type of use intended, some of these exact measurements will not be required, But for pure accuracy, leave no stone un turned.

J E CUSTOM
 

jdyoung

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Mar 1, 2020
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Ironman Country
Like most, I have a different method and philosophy to reach the desired seating but both ways shone will get you there fairly accurately. I do have different requirements than some, and have reasons for these requirements.

I rely on true measurements not feel. The instruments don't lie or have a reason to.
First, I don't use a bullet more than once or twice for any measurement that applies force of any kind because it can deform the bullet slightly and give false readings. (When you jam the bullet in the chamber using the bolt some deformation of the bullet jacket will take place. Although slight, it is still not representative of the new bullets in the un-fired form. For true accuracy, the base to Ogive must be measured on each bullet. If these dimensions vary, problems can occur if the bullets are jammed into the lands because of the differences bullet to bullet. Most methods will get you off the lands for safety, but How much, is what I am looking for.

Like many things in this sport, very few agree on everything or every aspect of someones method. most methods shone will keep you off the lands if measured/performed properly as in the video.
I rarely agree with everything on most videos, but many have merit and can help someone just getting started.

I am trying to put together a video my self on this and show the method I prefer to use that can/will give me precise measurements with each type of bullet that will be used in a particular rifle/chamber and record all of the measurements for that chamber. I find that if I do a better job of measuring in the beginning, it is easier to find that accuracy node.

The one thing that I definitely don't ever do is jam the bullet into the lands and prefer to not touch them ether because of the slight differences in bullets. I find that if best accuracy is in this state, changing the load can/will solve this and keep you much safer and trouble free.

Being off the lands is the safest, how much is an individual thing. In many cases this kind of precision loading is/may not be necessary or even measurable for some, so take it for what it is worth. If I can squeeze .010 thousandths more out of a load, I will but in many cases it is not necessary, so as long as the load performs for the type of use intended, some of these exact measurements will not be required, But for pure accuracy, leave no stone un turned.

J E CUSTOM
Looking forward for your video !!!!
 

Ranger1994

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Oct 24, 2019
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Location
North Carolina
J E thanks for this video. As a l-o-n-g time hunter, short time reloaded I found this method to be a great way to begin to find my seating depth. As a matter of fact I had just read about this method in an article written by Bryan Litz, so this video reinforces in my mind that I'm doing it correctly. Looking forward to your video as well in the future. Thanks again.
 

Buzzsaw

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Mar 18, 2008
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Frisco, Texas
I use the Hornady tool with modified cases. It works perfect when using a wooden dowel rod, pushed in from the muzzle till it touches the bullet tip. You can work the bullet back n forth feeling the bullet "touch" the lands and also jam into the lands. Then measure OAL.

ITS SO SIMPLE.
 

dblizzard

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Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Messages
21
Location
Oregon
I use the Hornady tool with modified cases. It works perfect when using a wooden dowel rod, pushed in from the muzzle till it touches the bullet tip. You can work the bullet back n forth feeling the bullet "touch" the lands and also jam into the lands. Then measure OAL.

ITS SO SIMPLE.
Yes, the dowel & being able to feel the bullet meeting the lands works well for me too. It is repeatable.
 

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