Brass sizing question

njc89

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I have some once fired Lapua brass (from Berger factory ammo) that I am reloading for my 260 rem. Dies are standard Redding FL (not bushing), and I am using the Redding competition shell holders that help uniformly control the shoulder bump. When sizing the brass, I notice some of the cases are much more difficult than others to pull the expander ball out of the neck on the press’s down stroke. I am using Imperial sizing wax on all the cases for sizing. When loading the bullets, some are a tighter fit than others.

I understand the concept of uniform neck tension aiding accuracy, but don’t know where best to focus to best address this concern. Does this seem like a case of varying neck thickness in the brass? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks

Neal
 

whirlwindjml

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The amount of lube varying can make a big difference. Make sure ya lube the neck a dab outside and the body but not the shoulder. I toss them in the walnut vibrator for 30 min to remove lube. Then I have a musket cap tin full of h1000 and graphite mixed. I dip the case in. The little bit of graphite help bullets slide in. Keeps copper and brass from trying to bond over time. Lowers ES. And the seat feel feels more consistent.
 

Tripodmvr7

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If the ES is not low then you would have to look at causes of the neck tension differences. Measuring the neck thickness would give you an idea of any inconsistencies.

If you are loading for hunting then fine tuning might not be necessary, but Whirlwind's methodology should help.
 

Tiny Tim

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Agree with Whirlwind. Lapua brass consistency is top notch and not likely a factor that you could feel as the expander went through. Also, their annealed well and once fired wouldn't have inconsistent hardness levels. It's likely and inconsistent lube application issue.
 

johnnyk

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I lube the inside of all my case necks with a brush and (insert your favorite brand) lube. Not a lot, just enough to darken the surface.
I've used the lube pad, spray on and now I'm using Hornady's Unique Case Lube. It's a finger(s) application process, not as fast as others, but I control how much lube goes on the cases and ultimately in the dies. It's easily wiped off after wards.
The only downside that I've noticed, if you can call it that, is when using ball or fine powders it clings to the lube inside the neck. Not a big deal to me as the bullet pushes it down.
 

Mikecr

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You should stop FL sizing your necks..
Pick up a bushing die, the right bushing for minimal sizing, use a mandrel die for neck pre-seating, and never lube necks again. This could be a 'FL bushing die', or a neck only bushing die combined with separate body die sizing.
 

Paulstarr

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Totally agree with Mikecr,use neck bushing die, you only need 001"fit and if you use chamber seating dies with an arbour press you get really good feel, something you don't get with a reloading press.I anneal my brass after every shoot with an AMP annealer but this piece of of gear is expensive but I think it's worth it.
 

Mikecr

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Donuts (greater thickness near neck-shoulder junction than mouths) are inherent to case manufacture.
All new brass tapers in thickness from webs to mouths.
But even if you turn necks, there is nothing 'good' in FL sizing of necks (only bad).

Where you size beyond seated bullet bearing, you cause unexpanded neck to bind the bullet's bearing-base junction. This is not tension, it's binding.
In this scenario you're also bringing donut thickness (which is inconsistent) into play, for inconsistent tension.

The ONLY place where FL sizing of necks is at all helpful, is with competitive underbores needing extreme peak pressures to perform. With these, they need extreme bullet hold to jack up starting pressures. It works there because diminished returns from all this pressure also equals diminished variance of returns -from relatively minor things(like tension variances, powder variances, etc.).
None of this applies as 'good' for hunting capacity cartridges.
You could never pull off the same tricks with a 30-06 that you can with a 30BR.
 

rsnell

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Motor Mica is a powder and works well for lubricating the inside of the neck. It does not have to be removed before proceeding to the next step.
 

tribb

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I
Donuts (greater thickness near neck-shoulder junction than mouths) are inherent to case manufacture.
All new brass tapers in thickness from webs to mouths.
But even if you turn necks, there is nothing 'good' in FL sizing of necks (only bad).

Where you size beyond seated bullet bearing, you cause unexpanded neck to bind the bullet's bearing-base junction. This is not tension, it's binding.
In this scenario you're also bringing donut thickness (which is inconsistent) into play, for inconsistent tension.

The ONLY place where FL sizing of necks is at all helpful, is with competitive underbores needing extreme peak pressures to perform. With these, they need extreme bullet hold to jack up starting pressures. It works there because diminished returns from all this pressure also equals diminished variance of returns -from relatively minor things(like tension variances, powder variances, etc.).
None of this applies as 'good' for hunting capacity cartridges.
You could never pull off the same tricks with a 30-06 that you can with a 30BR.
I'm. Confused her please explain. The un sized portion of a neck sizing only operation should leave the unsized portion larger than the bullet dimeter! Right? I use neck sizing only dies and do not shrink/size the neck to shoulder and leave a portion of neck at chamber size to help center the case in chamber. Is this incorrect thiking causing higher pressure etc. ?
 

Paulstarr

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I
I'm. Confused her please explain. The un sized portion of a neck sizing only operation should leave the unsized portion larger than the bullet dimeter! Right? I use neck sizing only dies and do not shrink/size the neck to shoulder and leave a portion of neck at chamber size to help center the case in chamber. Is this incorrect thiking causing higher pressure etc. ?
 

Mikecr

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I'm. Confused her please explain. The un sized portion of a neck sizing only operation should leave the unsized portion larger than the bullet dimeter! Right? I use neck sizing only dies and do not shrink/size the neck to shoulder and leave a portion of neck at chamber size to help center the case in chamber. Is this incorrect thiking causing higher pressure etc. ?
Are you replying to the wrong thread perhaps?
Nothing about my post relates to or counters your understanding of bushing neck sizing.
Nobody in this thread has implied higher pressures from bushing neck sizing.

So yes, you are confused
 
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