Bore Snakes

Rick Richard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,336
Location
North Carolina
Really? Has anyone ever seen a barrel damaged by a Bore Snake? I just can’t see that device doing that with the amount of times it would be used. However, I guess it could happen.
 

Kmccord

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2016
Messages
912
Location
Reilly Springs, TX
I only use my bore snake if I had swabbed the barrel with gun oil after the last cleaning, just to remove any oil residue in the barrel prior to shooting. I highly doubt I will damage my crown, but I am always aware of it while cleaning with anything, whether pushing a nylon brush out the muzzle and back in the barrel or anything else that is used out of the muzzle. For an actual cleaning session it is a bore guide, Tipton carbon fiber rod, bore tech jag and bore tech C4 carbon remover, bore tech eliminator and bore tech copper solvent if needed. Doesn't take long to get it clean, if not going to shoot for a while, I will run a patch or two with gun oil down the barrel to keep the chrome moly barrels from rusting.
 

Wachsmann

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
959
Location
Idaho
I used a bore snake for years on a few rifles. First off I've never seen any crown damage. Yes carbon can be abrasive but the bore snake is soft and generally just absorbs the carbon dust. Also if you pay close attention most of it comes out where the brush is attached in the snake. Now when pulling the brush through keep it on a straight out pull but copper is softer than stainless or chrome molly also. So here is where I think a bore snake shines. We normally shoot our guns at the range and those that don't have custom rifles barrels, that first shot is generally outside the group on a fresh cleaned barrel. Then after 1 or 2 fouler shots the gun will group 3 to 5 round or more just fine. What I seen on all my stock rifles using a bore snake it keeps the condition of a semi clean but fouled barrel so I don't have that first shot that outside the group. So I don't go to the woods with a shinny perfectly cleaned barrel trying to make a precise shot just to miss because I did shot a fouler shot. I do clean my guns to the shiny clean but before a few days before hunting starts, the gun is shot with what ever load I'm shooting couple of time for last minute practice and the bore snake is ran through 2 times for conditioning and that is how it goes to the woods. Also with this method I'm not just looking at taking a 3 to 400 yard shot either. Last animal I took at distance was 761yards. Dial my scope and bang. Dead mule deer. Also 4800+ round through a 6.5X284 it wasn't the crown that went bad it was the throat area.
 

tribb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2011
Messages
407
Just last night I spotted an can of aerosol carb cleaner in the garage. Got me to thinking 'barrel vertical, muzzle down, give it a spray and let drain.' Wonder how effective that will be?

The bore snakes that I own and have never used all have a bronze brush embedded in them. Am tempted to cut those off before I do use them.
Hello just a though here . The brushes are easily removed by opening the weave of the snake at the x in the fibers! Just push about 2 inches of the snake together and the weave opens up . Roll it back over the brush a bit hold brush with pliers and work/ roll snake onover brush! Did this to mine and use patches on end loop. Do damage from brush. Looks like I good and posted twice old age I reckon Tribb
Just last night I spotted an can of aerosol carb cleaner in the garage. Got me to thinking 'barrel vertical, muzzle down, give it a spray and let drain.' Wonder how effective that will be?

The bore snakes that I own and have never used all have a bronze brush embedded in them. Am tempted to cut those off before I do use them.
Just open the weave expose end of brush grip with pliers and roll weave off and over it. Did it to all mine use patches on loop and can add a pull back string in case patch is too big and stops in throat works great. Tribb
 

whirlwindjml

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2009
Messages
590
Location
Rathdrum Idaho
I dont see the bore snake as a gimmick. But as was mentioned it's not really the best cleaning tool. I keep one with clp in my truck during hunting season. I pull it through after hikes through the nasty to remove debris and moisture. It's lite so it can ride in pack when I'm spike camped. I don't like hunting in November with no way to make sure my barrel is oiled.

If I need to actually clean an not swabb then use the real tools at home.
 

justinp61

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
244
I use a piece of 40# monofilament fishing line to pull patches through my barrels. The same piece works on everything from my 10 meter .177 air rifles to my 30-06, just different size patches.
 

General RE LEE

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2020
Messages
683
Location
Middle Tennessee
I used a bore snake for years on a few rifles. First off I've never seen any crown damage. Yes carbon can be abrasive but the bore snake is soft and generally just absorbs the carbon dust. Also if you pay close attention most of it comes out where the brush is attached in the snake. Now when pulling the brush through keep it on a straight out pull but copper is softer than stainless or chrome molly also. So here is where I think a bore snake shines. We normally shoot our guns at the range and those that don't have custom rifles barrels, that first shot is generally outside the group on a fresh cleaned barrel. Then after 1 or 2 fouler shots the gun will group 3 to 5 round or more just fine. What I seen on all my stock rifles using a bore snake it keeps the condition of a semi clean but fouled barrel so I don't have that first shot that outside the group. So I don't go to the woods with a shinny perfectly cleaned barrel trying to make a precise shot just to miss because I did shot a fouler shot. I do clean my guns to the shiny clean but before a few days before hunting starts, the gun is shot with what ever load I'm shooting couple of time for last minute practice and the bore snake is ran through 2 times for conditioning and that is how it goes to the woods. Also with this method I'm not just looking at taking a 3 to 400 yard shot either. Last animal I took at distance was 761yards. Dial my scope and bang. Dead mule deer. Also 4800+ round through a 6.5X284 it wasn't the crown that went bad it was the throat area.

I follow the same regimen during hunting season and it has worked great. Shoot some before season opens and run a bore snake through to get the bulk fouling out but it leaves enough fouling in the bore to keep the POI from being off.

I also do something similar with my muzzleloader. Shoot 3 primers and swab the bore one time. It will distribute the primer fouling through the bore and create a fouled bore condition without leaving hygroscopic BP substitute residue. Primer residue from fouling accumulates in the throat area. Giving it a swab will distribute it through the bore.
 

Hand Skills

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Messages
1,164
Location
Canada
To me, there is cleaning, and then there is field cleaning.

To clean a rifle barrel, short of electrolysis, a one piece rod (with jag and a nylon brush) is a pretty good way to go.

...but for those boneheaded times I fall in a creek or somehow end up with a rifle full of muck or snow ... A bore snake has proven handy. They are not great for clearing obstructions, but in concert with a small stick, will get the job done (at least to the point where I don't flinch when it comes time to pull the trigger). I have a few sizes, but usually I just pack the .22 cal - it seems to work, and it's not as hard to pull through.

Maybe I am just a wuss, but I feel like going undersize on the bore snake makes it less likely for me to hurt the barrel (or myself 😂).

Kind of curious about the fishing line and a patch - how does that work? Does someone make a jag for that?
 

justinp61

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
244
Kind of curious about the fishing line and a patch - how does that work? Does someone make a jag for that?
I cut the line about 2 1/2 times the length of my longest barrel and tie a knot in it to make a large loop. At the end opposite of the knot I’ll pinch it with a pair of pliers, this is where the patch will ride. My patches are made out of cotton rags, like t shirt material. Run the pinched down end into the bore from the muzzle until it comes out the breech. Then fold your patch over the line and pull it through. Experiment with patch size to fit snug in the bore.

Normally I’ll cut the line long and hang it with a heavy weight on it to take the twist out. It’s not necessary but makes it more user friendly.

On my rimfires if a carbon ring starts to develop I’ll pull a solvent soaked patch into the throat and let it sit over night to soften the carbon. It has worked well.
 
Top