Bipod or no, what’s your experience?

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by Longshotjames, Mar 11, 2019.


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  1. Yes always, it’s worth the weight!

    76.1%
  2. No never, I cut as much weight as possible

    17.4%
  3. Sometimes, I’ll explain below

    6.5%
  1. Yotekiller

    Yotekiller Well-Known Member

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    May 23, 2011
    For backpack hunting I never bring a bipod. I can shoot just as well off my pack. There is no reason for me to carry the extra weight.
     
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  2. mpayne

    mpayne Well-Known Member

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    Oct 26, 2012
    I always have one and most of the time I end up using it, I don't think i'm that good of a shot with out it!
     
    Rick Richard likes this.
  3. Velvet

    Velvet Member

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    17
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    Nov 5, 2017
    There are a lot of carbon fiber bipods with minimal weight.
    Take a look at Spartanprecisions....I´m in the process of buying some.
    Regards.
    FF
     
    Barrelnut and tuscan like this.
  4. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    Jan 21, 2008
    I always carry a bi-pod. I like the carbon fiber Evolution for its light weight, leg extensions, and quick detach capability. While it’s use has been 90% in classic prone position, it has also proven to be effective with several shots in a more upright positions off rocks, stumps, and other terrain where it’s use would not have normally beeen anticipated. I have found that the 45 degree angular leg position has provided the flexibility to acquire a solid support position when other means were unstable, ie limbs.
     
    Doug Herold, muleystalker and Velvet like this.
  5. Revolting Peasant

    Revolting Peasant Member

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    May 10, 2017
    Anyone notice a long range POI shift with vs. without bipod?
    RP
     
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  6. FIGJAM

    FIGJAM Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    In my experience that only happens when you have a flimsy stock and the bipod causes a free floated barrel to contact the stock, or put more pressure on a barrel that already contacts the stock.
     
    Velvet likes this.
  7. mpayne

    mpayne Well-Known Member

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    Oct 26, 2012
    I never have, should be about the same as a fence post, rocks limbs and your hand out there.
     
  8. CO_Guy

    CO_Guy Well-Known Member

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    Nov 16, 2018
    For all of our CO hunting, the bipod just gets in the way and adds weight. In the pronghorn area, it's flatland and sticks are needed for shots over the tall grass. For the elk hunts in the hills, if you are near trees, a branch works as well as anything but you will encounter the need to shoot over brush so sticks work well there also, as well as being a nice walking stick.
     
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  9. Velvet

    Velvet Member

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    Nov 5, 2017
    I think there is not a single hunting situation, therefore, there is no solution for all of them. But I was watching the evolution bipod, and it comes with short legs, but you can add the long ones to shoot sitting over the tall grass. Shots in plain terrain, to the antelope for example with tall grass, is complicated, but with the extensible legs, it would be a solution. It's a matter of trying.
     
    muleystalker likes this.
  10. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I have found no difference in POI from prone with a Bipod vs prone with a bag,etc. Form and practice plays a key role in achieving this consistency. It is possible to see small shifts between prone and more upright positions and bench which are consistent and can be adjusted for. I believe this is caused by rifle alignment/angle differences if observed. When evident, I have rarely seen differences greater the .5MOA, with producing a “lower” POI.
     
    Doug Herold likes this.
  11. Moose4Me

    Moose4Me Member

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    20
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    Dec 2, 2016
    Atlas V8 bipod with a LaRue Tactical quick disconnect is always on my reach out and touch'em rifle. Definitely worth the weight. When you get use to shooting off hand with it why mess with perfection. Hahaha
     
  12. 762x51

    762x51 Well-Known Member

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    Jan 8, 2016
    both my long range guns have harris 6-9's. they weigh 10 ounces, i'd rather have it and not need it. generally, i try to shoot off a pack but the bipod legs are there just in case.
     
  13. DR 3006

    DR 3006 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    122
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    Jul 3, 2013
    I carry my javelin bipod most anytime I am carrying my rifle. Day hunt or backpacking, its light and quick to connect. I do use it on my lighter hunting rifles as I think it's a little bit light (8oz I think?) for heavier long range rigs. But it definitely has helped my shooting in field conditions that allow a prone position. If I need to be taller I have my tripod (spotting scope) with quite often.
     
  14. 358 Guy

    358 Guy Member

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    16
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    Dec 21, 2012
    While I can't dispute the fact that bipods aid good shooting, I seldom use them in the mountains due to weight and bulk. I think all shooters should spend some time practicing using a proper sling from various field positions. Its amazing how much the use of a sling can aid good shooting. A lot of slings out there are not designed for shooting as much as for carrying. Select the proper sling, and practice. You may be surprised.
     
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