Backcountry hunting blinds

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Cutty, Oct 11, 2004.

  1. Cutty

    Cutty Active Member

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    I'm a lifelong bird hunter who just moved to the NorthWest and have started hunting big game, or rather started learning to. Just wanted to know if any of you guys have a recommendation for a packable ground blind I can use while hunting in the backcountry of Idaho and Montana for Elk and Deer.

    I've been doing a lot of hiking and glassing so far this year, and I feel I'd be much more effective with some concealment. I don't mind carrying some weight, but ease of set up is important to me, since I like to cover quite a bit of ground.
     
  2. gonehuntingagain

    gonehuntingagain Well-Known Member

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    Most of the time you will be able to find something like a fallen tree or a pile of tree branches that you could hide behind (talk about easy setup).
    I have never personally used a ground blind while big game hunting, but what I do is not to make any sudden or swift movements. I have taken plenty of deer at close range (less than 100 yards) that were looking at me - simply because I moved slowly while shouldering my rifle. Heck, I bought a 300 Win Mag many years ago so I could reach out and touch something - only to kill all but 1 deer at 75 yards or less.

    Sounds like you have a good start by hiking and glassing. If you can figure out where the animals are going, you can get there ahead of them and surprise them - a ground blind may not be needed.
     
  3. preacherman

    preacherman Well-Known Member

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  4. COBrad

    COBrad Well-Known Member

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    I don't mess with ground blinds, even when bowhunting. I have always done fine using terrain features or vegetation to break up my outline. Mostly watch the wind, and move like a cat when still hunting - slow and silent. That said, I have considered carrying a piece of camo netting and a bit of parachute cord while archery hunting to make a quick blind.
     
  5. Bob S.

    Bob S. Well-Known Member

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    Camo head to toe, especially the face and hands. Nothing shiney, watch the wind, and move like a cat. I suggest no smoking or chewing either for multiple reasons. You will not need any ground blind. I've been close enough to have me and my client pee'd on by a bull elk. I have never hunted from a blind other than ducks or geese and see no reason to carry one into the backcountry. I am not putting down blind hunters as they can be the ticket for certain instances like the noisy northeast when the fallen leaves are knee deep.
     
  6. Cutty

    Cutty Active Member

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    Thanks guys, great information. How do you guys avoid making excessive noise when moving through dry pine needles and slash early in the season?
     
  7. Imortal Wombat

    Imortal Wombat Well-Known Member

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    I wear boots by a company called Oliver (i think) but thay arn't available in the US (im fron Australia) they are very sturdy, but have a very soft sole on them which helps to minimise noise.
    I also try to avoid clothes made from canvas and other stiff noisy material.
     
  8. gonehuntingagain

    gonehuntingagain Well-Known Member

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    It is darn near impossible to not make noise with the dry weather that has plagued the west the last few years.
    If you can figure out the animal's habits, mainly the trails and what time of day they will use these trails, you can find a stump to sit on and let them come to you. This really works well if there are other hunters in the area - let them push the animals to you.