A case for prs

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A Case For Prs

A Case For PRS
By Sam Nelson

I checked again for wind, the mirage was a boil, almost imperceptible. I could feel a coolness on my back where my shirt was damp from sweat, but it came and went and it never stayed more than a few seconds. I checked my watch again, 8:00 pm on the dot. Shooting light ended at 8:16. I watched the cow elk make her way down the ridge. She was the only one in view, and she was moving too slowly. At 8:07 she popped up on the ridge farther down than I...
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LanceK

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Nov 26, 2018
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Amarillo, TX
Good article, I have found a local group that shoots NRL22 matches, I think it will help me a lot when hunting. With two kids and a demanding job, it is nice to be able to work on my hunting skills without having to take the time to reload.
 

Greyfox

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Jan 21, 2008
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Northeast
Good article! I started participating in PRS competition a few years ago and have since become quite addicted. I t has completely changed the dynamic of my off season(hunting) activity, shifting from simple(and often monotonous banging of steel targets, to a never ending expansion of different shooting positions, techniques, and equipment that has surely added to my LR hunting capability. Next season I will try a new build that blends the two disciplines(below). Their is a major difference between PRS and LR hunting that requires a shift in thinking process, particularly if you are a PRS shooter looking to take up LRH. PRS is a percentage game. You can take first place in s match hitting 70-80% of the targets which may be a full sized IPSC at 1000 yards, much larger then the vitals of a mule deer at that range. Correction/test shots during a match are quite common and often required for adjustments in difficult wind conditions. Like IPSC and other “action” shooting games, “center shot” accuracy is many times traded off against speed, as most stages are timed. As we are well aware, LRH is a one shot process that should be taken with the confidence that you have a 100% chance of a hit in the animals vitals. Speed needs to be traded against time, and certainty of conditions, accepting the fact that a shot may not be taken at all. This s a frequent conversation with ORS shooters looking to getting into LRH. Overall, I think the benefits of shooting PRS will add immensely to shooting skills and excitement in the off season and recommended if you have s venue nearby.
Just some thoughts.

My PRS rifle in 6.5x47L(980 yd steel stage during match), LRH Rifle in 6.6x284(for 10 years), my recent LRH Rifle in 6.6x284 that I will try out next hunting season. Ergonomics/balance of this build with the exception of overall weight(3.5# less) is identical to my PRS rifle.
DB46A087-1801-4619-99C0-100DD49191E0.jpeg E2FABA59-E945-4A09-A150-13BF931527BC.jpeg C1186952-0996-47CA-BC04-7C3DC3E7BD5A.jpeg
 

SDMOL

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Sep 26, 2017
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How do you find out about events in your area? I'm in NJ and thinking about trying this.
 

Bimbo19

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Mar 17, 2019
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Location
Bali
Good article! I started participating in PRS competition a few years ago and have since become quite addicted. I t has completely changed the dynamic of my off season(hunting) activity, shifting from simple(and often monotonous banging of steel targets, to a never ending expansion of different shooting positions, techniques, and equipment that has surely added to my LR hunting capability. Next season I will try a new build that blends the two disciplines(below). Their is a major difference between PRS and LR hunting that requires a shift in thinking process, particularly if you are a PRS shooter looking to take up LRH. PRS is a percentage game. You can take first place in s match hitting 70-80% of the targets which may be a full sized IPSC at 1000 yards, much larger then the vitals of a mule deer at that range. Correction/test shots during a match are quite common and often required for adjustments in difficult wind conditions. Like IPSC and other “action” shooting games, “center shot” accuracy is many times traded off against speed, as most stages are timed. As we are well aware, LRH is a one shot process that should be taken with the confidence that you have a 100% chance of a hit in the animals vitals. Speed needs to be traded against time, and certainty of conditions, accepting the fact that a shot may not be taken at all. This s a frequent conversation with ORS shooters looking to getting into LRH. Overall, I think the benefits of shooting PRS will add immensely to shooting skills and excitement in the off season and recommended if you have s venue nearby.
Just some thoughts.

My PRS rifle in 6.5x47L(980 yd steel stage during match), LRH Rifle in 6.6x284(for 10 years), my recent LRH Rifle in 6.6x284 that I will try out next hunting season. Ergonomics/balance of this build with the exception of overall weight(3.5# less) is identical to my PRS rifle.
View attachment 127578 View attachment 127576 View attachment 127577
+1
 

HobieH3

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Jan 16, 2019
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174
Location
KY
Hoping to get started in KY next year.
Accumulating some gear...
 

Whitesheep

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Aug 22, 2010
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Location
Phoneix
My experience matches the author's. PRS has allowed me to use my hunting rifle (.280AI Nosler M48) to hit 1 MOA targets at 1000 yards. I have no intention of shooting game at that distance. My personal limit hunting is 400 yards.

My rifle looks out of place next to all the PRS chassis in the rack, but is actually competitive in production class. The club is very welcoming and shares gear and advice willingly. I learn something at every match and can't wait for the next one.
 
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