.264 Win Mag vs. 7mm Mag

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Rhino Hunter, Sep 14, 2010.

  1. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering one of these two and was hoping for some opinions on them.

    It would be mostly for long range hunting for deer, antelope. I already have a .300 Win Mag that works good on elk.

    However I don't reload...at least not yet.

    Also, I've been eyeing the Remmington's Sendero and Savage's Long Range Hunter. Any opionions of those would be welcome too.

    Thanx in advance!!!

    RH
     
  2. Nomosendero

    Nomosendero Well-Known Member

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    What caught my eye here is the fact that you don't load ammo, yet! You need to decide whether or not you will & you most likely will if you decide to shoot alot, this decision has a big bearing on these 2 cartridge choices. If you don't load, it's 7RM hands down, the factory load choices with good bullets of different weights is vast indeed for the 7, but very limited for the 264.

    And if you do load, the 7 would still be a great choice, but I would lean toward the 264. I say that because you allready have a 300, which takes care of Elk and above, you can load the 300 with the 180 or 200 Accubond or the 210 Berger at 2900 or so & the Berger load would be very close to a 7RM 180Berger load at 2950 in ballistics, but with more terminal effect.

    For Deer & Antelope & small, the 264 will mirror the results of a 257 Wea with comparable bullets for cal 6.5 120gr. vs 115 257cal, 125 Nos Part vs 120 Nos Part., etc for those that favor the "trajectory magnum" mpbr type thinking, so about as flat as it gets there. Plus, for the long range shooter, the 130 & 140 Berger blows the 25 cal away & with the 140 Berger at 3100-3200
    runs with the best of them & way out there do better than the 7mm bullets as a rule under the 180 Berger.

    Just my thoughts. I have a 300 & used the 7RM years ago, but I just got a 264, I guess I believe it.
     
  3. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    sendero; .264 and start reloading
     
  4. Wookie316

    Wookie316 Well-Known Member

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    I like the 264, but with that being said they can be very hard to find a load for. But once you do it will be all smiles. I have lost my love for the 264 since H870 powder has been discontinued. That powder really shines in a 264 with a 140gr bullet.

    With today's bullets you can shoot a 140gr out of a 7mm faster & usually they will group with very little load development.

    I had 2 rifles built last year. A 7mm for my Dad & a 264 WM for myself & I must say with all the grief I had with my 264, I wish I had built two 7mm's instead.

    Some shoot 120's out of a 264 with good success, I much prefer to shoot the 140's & take advantage of the high BC of that bullet. Either opinion is not wrong, it is just two different ways to approach the 264.

    This is my 264, which is now a 24 1/2" barreled 6.5mm-300 Win Mag. The caliber change is a whole other story we can get into at some other time. I can push a 140gr 3300 FPS now though the way it is :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. SomeRumbum

    SomeRumbum Well-Known Member

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    My .264 mag Sendero shoots great. But you will need to reload. Or, you could have someone do it. Use any brass (Nosler makes some good match brass now), Fed215m primers, RE25 (about 646-70 grains), 130 Nosler Accubonds or 120 Ballistic Tips and you will be happy.

    We shoot rocks at 750 yards. Get a Kenton Knob on your Leupold or ?? scope and go to town.
     
  6. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    What brand action is that on your cool looking rifle ?
     
  7. Rhino Hunter

    Rhino Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I really like the thought of a .264, over a 7mm that everybody and their brother has. Not to dis the 7mm as I think it truly is a great round, but very common place.

    Okay...I was afraid it was going to get to this, but...how much $ would it be for me to get into reloading starting from zero. Please keep in mind that I've never reloaded and I'm not aware of any friends that do. Give my your best guess as to what it would cost for all of the hardware, books, gauges, scales (I think I got rid of all of my college scales), etc. ;-)

    And if I did get into reloading how much do you think it would save me per box?

    Thanx so much!

    RH
     
  8. SomeRumbum

    SomeRumbum Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. I shoot either 300 RUM or 264 mag. The 264 is pleasant to shoot. Lots of good high BC bullets to choose from.

    Reloading set ups: Cabellas has a deal. 1. Hornady Lock N Load Classic Reloading Kit $329.99. 2. Better.....RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Deluxe Kit $779.99.

    The latter will also give you an electronic dispenser and scale. That is what I have and it has been running strong for over 10 years with not problems and tons and tons of poweder run through it. Still works great.
     
  9. Wookie316

    Wookie316 Well-Known Member

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    That is a Sako AV action. One of the best IMO :cool:
     
  10. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    You could save I think any where from 1/2 to 2/3rds the cost of factory ammo with hand loading. Plus you can load any type bullet powder combo available
     
  11. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    with realoading its not only the $$ amount you save, its shrinking your groups too. As far as the 7mm Rem vs. .264 Win. I favore the .264. In fact it will probably be my next rifle. you can also look to the .280 Rem if you want something diffrent, its almost the same as the 7mm rem ballisticly and does so more efficeintly. I would still grab the .264 win in a Senduro.
     
  12. jpeaston

    jpeaston Well-Known Member

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    I like the 7mag, or you can be like my buddies and join the Berger Backorder Club waiting on 6.5's.
     
  13. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

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    If I had to choose one for all around it would be the 7RM BUT, being that you have a 300Win I would go for the 264. I have a soft spot for the 264, don't know what it is but it just does it for me. As stated the 120's are one way to go and the 140 are another. I used one as a light rifle in South Africa and it kicked ***.
    264 Win and 257 Rob are two cartridges that I will revisit in the future
     
  14. Buano

    Buano Well-Known Member

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    My first big game rifle was a 7mm Rem Mag & I still have it. It's a great cartridge, but it's almost a clone of your .300 Win. A 7mm Rem is a .300 Win necked down .016". These two cartridges are too close together to be adding much in shooting options. The .264 Win, on the other hand, gives you the capacity for light-fast bullets suitable for anything from Coyote control to Elk but optimum for antelope through deer.

    The problem with the .264 Win is that few factory loads are available for it. Do not consider it unless you plan on reloading. If not, drop down to the .25-06 where plenty of factory offerings are available. Last I knew the Sendero 2 was available in both .264 Win and .25-06 so you have the choice. I stopped using my 7mm Rem mag for deer because I was doing too much damage to meat. I went to a .25-06 as a step-down with nearly identical ballistics, that would do a lot less damage to something I was going to eat.

    As previously stated you can save 1/3-2/3 the cost of factory ammunition by reloading once you cover the cost of getting started. Reloading is like many of our hobbies, relatively cheap to get started on, but it can get more expensive. You can price basic equipment on-line at places like Cabelas or Bass Pro. To start you will need a press, case trimmer, powder measure, scale, tumbler (to clean cases) and I recommend a chronograph. Kits are sold with most of what you need to get started. You will also need a die-set for each cartridge you reload for plus appropriate powders, primers, and bullets. Reloading makes sense if you will be doing much recreational shooting or if you plan hunting out past 600 yards AND if you enjoy tinkering with loads trying to develop the perfect load for your rifle. If these don't fit you, it makes sense for you to go to the .25-06 & use factory ammunition.

    As for the Sendero, it's a good rifle. Many find it too heavy for a carry rifle but few complain about how they shoot. I would definitely add an aftermarket trigger.