Wyoming type 6 hunts

seattleman1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
313
Location
Missoula, Mt
In the area I hunted last near near Baggs type 7's were within one mile of irrigated land only. Not that it made any difference, our group had six type 7 tags and all were filled easily within the first 3 days. Likewise the two type 6 tags for an adjacent unit. It is well worth it to get a GPS and either the Mytopogps hunt uint maps or the hunt by XMAPS maps that provide details regarding landownership etc. It pays to know exactly where you are... some of the ranchers and guides/outfitters will try to spook you off of legal land.
 

pods8

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2014
Messages
326
Location
Colorado
as i recall it was 65, but it may have been a type 7 hunt as it seemed to have a lot of strange micro boundaries. I bought the leftover 65 tag after missing out on unit 55 within the few seconds that they went on sale. the boundary was west of the main hwy thru lander, north of the little popo agie and south of the popo agie river. after some time, i did find access to public land through some fishing access and later a WMA that i couldn't seem to find on the maps. it proved to me the value of having a gps with a chip. it would have saved some headaches and though i still dont own one, i plan to soon.

to be honest, i spend a lot of time bow hunting elk and mule deer in the mountains. i had in my mind a quick easy access hunt that i could spot from near a road, make a plan and stalk to within a reasonable range for either my bow or rifle as the wind would allow. i don't mean to minimize the effort needed to harvest but i can really only allow for 1 to 2 days of hunting at a time, once or twice. if i can manage a walk in access hunt in that amount of time and salvage the meat then that's a possibility. if not, i need to stick to road access with shorter hikes.

Last year was my first trip up for antelope and my experience was if you can reliably shoot 400yds then tagging some does isn't too hard in the manner described (spot, quick stalk, then break of the knifes to get them into the cooler). Biggest issue I found was whether they were only land I could hunt or not, luckily they were but only offered one chance (once spooked they moved off public). Maybe I just got lucky on that front.

I've been told landowners are more receptive to doe/fawn hunters though, I may pursue it this year.
 

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