Which reloading manual...

Gibbshooter43

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
188
Location
Cottonwood Creek @ Myrtle, Idaho
Over the years I have accumulated the usual variety of reloading manuals from all the normal suppliers as well as a few of the on-line suppliers of data. I’m often somewhat confused by the variation in detail each supplies. I know that every manual recommends you start at the lowest offering and work up from there. But here’s my question... what source of reloading data have you found to be most accurate / dependable as a starting point (without bashing anyone else)?
 

J E Custom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2004
Messages
9,980
Location
Texas
I prefer the Hodgdon yearly magazine loading manual because they normally have the latest new cartridges. From there, I use the powder manufactures manual for the powder I intend to use.

Bullet manufactures tend to show their bullets perform better than others and often times lower the powder charge of their competition to make their powder look better.

All are very conservative because of different barrels, chambers and loading process. Just because a manual shows a load as Minimum doesn't mean It is in your rifle/pistol.

J E CUSTOM
 

kiwikid

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
506
Location
New Zealand
Sierra is my first source and I find their accuracy loads to be on the money. Lyman is another good manual due to them not making bullets so there is no bias. I was disappointed with the new Hornady manual, they show the 6.5CM is faster than the
6.5-284 Norma.
 

aushunter1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
510
Location
Sydney
But here’s my question... what source of reloading data have you found to be most accurate / dependable as a starting point (without bashing anyone else)?
The one that come from the powder manifacturer themselves, full stop.

Even if your projectile is not covered in their data they are still the guideline for the stuff that pushes whatever pill you are using!!
 

kiwikid

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
506
Location
New Zealand
The one that come from the powder manifacturer themselves, full stop.

Even if your projectile is not covered in their data they are still the guideline for the stuff that pushes whatever pill you are using!!
The only problem with this theory is that certain powder manufacturers don't list loads for certain cartridges where projectile manufacturers do.

An example of this is Alliant Powder, they have no listings what so ever for the 6.5-284 Norma but the Sierra Bullets 6th Edition has loads with Rel 16, 17, 19, 23, 25 and 26 in various projectile weights.
 

fiftybmg

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
209
Location
Johannesburg, South Africa
There is no single authority, rather gather as much data as you can, compare, and that way make informed decisions.

Basic check routine :

1. First see what barrel length the load data was assembled for. Use powder data that's as close to actual barrel length as possible.
2. Find the bullet you are using. If you can't find it, find the next heavier bullet, and use that data to start.
3. Try and use the primer quoted in the load data.
4. If the cartridge is not in the book, next book.
5. If none of the books list your powder for a cartridge, it's not the right powder.

When doing load development

1. check actual velocity versus published velocity
2. if your actual velocity is less than published, and you are using the same max quantity of powder, stop there.
3. if your actual velocity goes to the max shown in the data, but your powder is still less, stop there.

This is called being conservative.

Most variations from published load data are due to one or more of : different barrel length, primer, brass headstamp and ambient temperature.

We never know what ambient temperature the load data was put together at, another reason to start low and work up if you are in a hot climate.

It is possible to safely exceed published load data for certain cartridge / powder / bullet combinations, but unless you understand how, and have the tools to measure the results, don't.
 

Jeffrey Van Zandt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
Messages
310
Location
tok
I have over 20 some all the way back to early 50s I only use them for hand gun or shotgun as far as rifle, I only look at starting load for the bullet gr weight and powder then I go from there up till I see pressure but for the pat 7 years I have not even open one
 

BHP9

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2007
Messages
212
Location
Ontario, Canada
I prefer Sierra's manual but liked Hodgdon' annual until I couldn't get it in my area. Not since 2014.

I do look at Hornady's manual but more fore handgun.
 

Recent Posts

Latest Classifieds

Nightforce has great tracking capabilities, they are rugged, a bunch of elevation, holds zero forever, and reticles are designed for long range shooting. So if you are looking to shoot long distances constantly, then you need a scope that can take the abuse. -- gilmillan1


Culture Of Excellence At Nightforce Optics
By Len Backus

A high level of quality both in production and in service. Read More


Nightforce is such a solid combo of reticle, available elevation, glass that is good enough to shoot at the longest range you can dial. Nightforce has bullet proof construction that can handle the incidental horse rolling or some other rodeo action. -- bigngreen


Nightforce ATACR Scope Review
By Jeff Brozovich

The new NightForce ATACR is for sure a top choice for any long range shooter. Read More


The total package. Nightforce is the best I have used as far as turret feel and solid detents. I have never had one that didn't track right on and always return to zero. Nightforce NXS is the best value for everything I need. -- Broz


Nightforce Velocity 1000 Reticle Review
By Scott Shreve

I think Nightforce knocked it outta the park with this reticle! Read More

NightForce


Top