Tempilaq temperature rating?

gohring3006

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Do you guys use Tempilaq? If so what temp rating do you use? And is there another way of annealing without it, that's reliable?
 

Wyo7200

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I use 700. The temp will go a little further up the scale before the case drops out of the heat so it probably gets ~725.

There are tons of youtube vids that you can google that would probably give you a better idea of what to do and to look for depending on the method you choose to pursue. I built an annealer based off some plans I saw on a 68forum.
 

Trickymissfit

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I use three of them. 400, 450, and 500 degrees. Normal temp to anneal brass is about 430 degrees, and by the time you remove the brass it will already have increased a little bit in temperature. Too much heat will most certainly weaken the brass just as much as not enough. Be sure to shock the brass soon after removing from the heat source (ice water is best).
gary
 

gohring3006

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I went ahead and ordered the 750, I hope its not too much heat. I have read 750 is where its at. I didn't want to be wasting my time by not getting it hot enough. But i don't want to ruin it either. I hope i made the right choice.
 

squirrel chaser

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I will appologize in advance if I am intruding on this thread but, found it intresting and when the U tube vidios were brought up I couldn't help myself. I watched one of these vidios and very carefully tried it with some .25 WSSM cases then went ahead and reloaded them as normal with the load my gun likes the best. The result was a case stuck in the chamber completely poping the primer out and making it very difficult to open the bolt. I thought I had made a mistake with the load somewhere so rechecked everything dropped the powder back to minimum just to be on the safe side and reluctantly tried it again with not quite as bad but yet the same results. Then tried a case I never annealed and loaded it with the same loads and it worked perfectly. Can anyone help me understand why this is happening?
Again sorry for jumping in on the thread,but new to the sight.
 

Wyo7200

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I will appologize in advance if I am intruding on this thread but, found it intresting and when the U tube vidios were brought up I couldn't help myself. I watched one of these vidios and very carefully tried it with some .25 WSSM cases then went ahead and reloaded them as normal with the load my gun likes the best. The result was a case stuck in the chamber completely poping the primer out and making it very difficult to open the bolt. I thought I had made a mistake with the load somewhere so rechecked everything dropped the powder back to minimum just to be on the safe side and reluctantly tried it again with not quite as bad but yet the same results. Then tried a case I never annealed and loaded it with the same loads and it worked perfectly. Can anyone help me understand why this is happening?
Again sorry for jumping in on the thread,but new to the sight.

Gotta give us more info, such as which annealing method you ended up trying. Hope you didn't just watch just one video on the topic and had a go at it.

Sounds like they were heated too long and the whole body was annealed.

"Cartridge brass which has been annealed over its entire length will exhibit signs of excessive pressure even with moderate and reduced loads. Indeed, cases in this condition are subjected to excessive pressures. Any pressure is excessive. Head separation, incipient head separation, stuck or sticky cases, blown primers, swollen cases, swollen case heads, enlarged primer pockets (I mean REALLY enlarged), and just about every other sign of excessive pressure imaginable can occur with cases which have been annealed over their entire length."

6mmbr
 

squirrel chaser

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The one we tried was heating just the shoulder with a torch to where you could just see that it was starting to turn to glow red then wait a few minutes till it partially cooled then quench in water-a lot of guessing- if you could acculy see it glow too hot and if quenched to soon to where it sizzled upon hitting water too early. So much for this being a simple task and how it can so drasticly change the performance of a load.
Live and learn!
Thanks for the reply!
 

Trickymissfit

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I will appologize in advance if I am intruding on this thread but, found it intresting and when the U tube vidios were brought up I couldn't help myself. I watched one of these vidios and very carefully tried it with some .25 WSSM cases then went ahead and reloaded them as normal with the load my gun likes the best. The result was a case stuck in the chamber completely poping the primer out and making it very difficult to open the bolt. I thought I had made a mistake with the load somewhere so rechecked everything dropped the powder back to minimum just to be on the safe side and reluctantly tried it again with not quite as bad but yet the same results. Then tried a case I never annealed and loaded it with the same loads and it worked perfectly. Can anyone help me understand why this is happening?
Again sorry for jumping in on the thread,but new to the sight.

after heating the neck and shoulder area to the correct temperature, did you shock the brass to stop the annealing process? If not, you may have softened the entire case when all you want is the neck and shoulder area. Too much heat is actually worse than no heat at all, so be careful. If you take a piece of brass and heat one end, the heat will transfer very quickly to the other end. Much faster than a piece of steel of the same size and shape. Last thing you want to do is anneal the case head.
gary
 
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