Ravin 500 fps $$$$$ 😱 $3500!!

VLD Pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
1,978
Location
Northern, Mi
Speed just helps with distance error and , the biggie for me, allows for a shorter " slot " to shoot through in the Ga deer woods.
Read my above theory if you want my worthless oppinion on deer and noise .
No doubt it's a great advantage in trajectory and range. It's also something many can use and harvest big game at longer ranges with. I guess my point was that I found a quieter slow bow for average bow ranges to be better than a loud sizzling fast bow. At 60-80 yards, many times animals won't even hear the bow
 

CMP70306

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
428
I want to interject into the deer "jumping" a string. For years , ive heard about deer jumping from SOUND. I think that is an assumption that needs more study and not a given truth like every bowhunting show claims.
I believe the MOVEMENT of something so close is what makes a deer react , not the sound. I have seen multiple examples that prove this to me , both while bowhunting and firearms hunting . How many of you have been shocked by a rifle report so loud you would swear you were shot, only to have a deer in sight that completely ignores the shot ? And how many shooters have shot deer with archery gear from a position where the deers eye or eyes werent visible only to have the deer completely ignore the fact that an arrow just cleared their chest after going through both lungs ?
Avoiding the EYES of a deer when releasing an arrow is the trick to avoiding a reaction to the shot , not the sound of the bow or arrow. Noises don't make deer explode into movement , but seeing something flash out of the corner of their eye will make them come unglued.
The whole sound make deer jump lie has sure made a lot of money for those able to capitalize on the lie though, lol.......

Based on my videos it was absolutely the sound, I shot at a buck at 50 yards and yearling doe at 25 yards. In the video they react at different times but when you look at the numbers they both begin to react around 0.1 seconds after the sound of the bow reaches them.

Additionally in the video with the buck there were three deer there, the buck I shot at standing broadside, just to his left was a small buck facing directly away from me and the third deer was on the other side of some brush with his head below the grade where he could not see me. All three deer react at almost the exact same time even though two could not see my bow limbs move.
 

5.56×250

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
883
Location
Ga
No doubt it's a great advantage in trajectory and range. It's also something many can use and harvest big game at longer ranges with. I guess my point was that I found a quieter slow bow for average bow ranges to be better than a loud sizzling fast bow. At 60-80 yards, many times animals won't even hear the bow
Like i said in the post above the one you responded to, i really think its movement that spooks a deer up close, not sound. Thats why there seems to be so much mystery over whether a deer jumps the string or not . I would be willing to bet if you had or have the ability to look back on deer you've shot with archery gear, the ones that jump the string will have an eye visible when you release , and the ones that didn't jump your arrow were looking and/or focusing in another direction.
 

5.56×250

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
883
Location
Ga
Based on my videos it was absolutely the sound, I shot at a buck at 50 yards and yearling doe at 25 yards. In the video they react at different times but when you look at the numbers they both begin to react around 0.1 seconds after the sound of the bow reaches them.

Additionally in the video with the buck there were three deer there, the buck I shot at standing broadside, just to his left was a small buck facing directly away from me and the third deer was on the other side of some brush with his head below the grade where he could not see me. All three deer react at almost the exact same time even though two could not see my bow limbs move.
But the other deer reacted to the buck movement most likely , and its pretty hard to say one way or the other on a deers reaction time to a visual clue and a sound. Just because the math works for the sound doesn't mean the movement wasn't the cue to move. I really have spent a lifetime looking at archery deer hunting as a profession and have watched 1000s of deer in their natural habitats with archery gear in my hands . Deer ignore sounds for the most part , but their eyes are built to detect movement much more so than ours and they rely on that movement detection for survival much more so than sound. Its nose, then movement, with sound coming in a distant last place in their bag of survival tools.
 

5.56×250

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
883
Location
Ga
Try this if you ever get a chance if deer are around you in a calm setting with good wind . Without making a sound, throw your arm up with a deers eyes visible to you. They will break their necks coming unglued and the ones that don't see you will blow out of there with the ines that did. Next time, do the sound bit without moving. Chances are , the deer will either snatch their heads up and LOOK or ignore you .
 

VLD Pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
1,978
Location
Northern, Mi
Like i said in the post above the one you responded to, i really think its movement that spooks a deer up close, not sound. Thats why there seems to be so much mystery over whether a deer jumps the string or not . I would be willing to bet if you had or have the ability to look back on deer you've shot with archery gear, the ones that jump the string will have an eye visible when you release , and the ones that didn't jump your arrow were looking and/or focusing in another direction.
Most deer I kill are on a runway unaware of my presence. I've missed deer believe me. Clean misses due to my error. I've had them jump the string when feeding in food plots unaware of my presence. Never so much as looked in my direction. I've been busted and when that happens, I don't even try to draw on an alert deer. Hunting on bait piles does cause jumpy deer and unpredictable behavior. That's the scenario where a shooter needs to be aware that deer almost always seem to know danger is near.
 

CMP70306

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
428
But the other deer reacted to the buck movement most likely , and its pretty hard to say one way or the other on a deers reaction time to a visual clue and a sound. Just because the math works for the sound doesn't mean the movement wasn't the cue to move. I really have spent a lifetime looking at archery deer hunting as a profession and have watched 1000s of deer in their natural habitats with archery gear in my hands . Deer ignore sounds for the most part , but their eyes are built to detect movement much more so than ours and they rely on that movement detection for survival much more so than sound. Its nose, then movement, with sound coming in a distant last place in their bag of survival tools.

Nope, all three drop their shoulders simultaneously and the one on the far left could not directly see either of the other two bucks. The only explanation I could come up with is that they all heard the sound and turned to run. I don’t know if the deer around us are more skittish because they have been hunted so hard for decades but I definitely do not have the same issue when rifle hunting.
 

Orange Dust

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2015
Messages
2,381
Location
Mingo Swamp
Our deer have been bowhunted so much they walk around in the woods looking up. Yes, they will "Jump the String", actually drop to run on bowshots. I know quieter is better. I also know new feathers are quieter than vanes. We tested that many years ago by hiding behind a tree and shooting past each other (NOT RECOMMENDED). To this day I don't know if it is more the arrow in flight, the sound of the bow, or both. I do know once you get past their reaction time, 20yds give or take, the faster the bow the futher you get bad hits. Here's a little story from my years chasing speed in archery. Many years ago Pearson came out with a new mechanical compound called The Advantage. It was both heavy and super fast. If memory serves 350IBO. fastest bow on the planet at the time. I had to have one... Set it up with a 25" arrow on a 30" draw. Used XX75's large dia thin wall. Might have been 2213 or 2312's or something. Head was a 100gr 3 blade Anderson Magnum. It was bad fast. Seems like about 330. This is when a good compound was 250-270. Anyway, its first victim was a coyote. Range was about 20yds. Animal was facing me and I shot it in the throat. It ran off. Yellow dot from the fletching hit right where I aimed. I was astonished, climbed down to inspect the scene. Arrow shattered in pieces about 1" long. They were scattered around like confetti. I went home. New this was not a deer load. Went to store and bought some ACC shafts. Lighter, faster, stronger than before. Pushing 350 with a lighter head. Started shooting deer with it. Soon found instead of missing deer @30yds, you get bad hits, high or too far back from the deer moving. I will say this though, one of them was an 8 point @ just under 30yds. He ducked and the arrow hit him in the shoulder blade. Only deer I ever shot with a bow that broke both shoulders. He scooted on his hind feet and died before I could get another arrow in him. I sold it after using the heavy thing a couple of seasons. The moral is speed may flatten trajectory over what you now have. It will also likely increase penetration. It will not increase the distance you can successfully kill and RETRIEVE a whitetail by any meaningful distance.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
2,920
Location
Michigan
I work really hard to have a quiet bow that includes shooting at the upper spectrum of arrow spine. Shooting stiffer and sometimes heavier arrows results in ultra quiet bow for me. Never have tuning issues even with fixed blades. I hunt MI, IN, and out west for mule deer. No trouble shooting 60 yards accurately with old tried and true fixed blade 100 grain Thunderheads. You will be surprised how quiet you can get bows today. Most deer I kill move after the arrow passed through. If they are unaware, not wired up, do not know anything is amiss, the bow is quiet enough that it's lights out. Even as quiet as it is, if the deer is wired up for any reason, it will drop at even the slightest noise. I always try to aim high heart to give myself extra edge.

Crossbows even at 500fps are like timing me with a calendar against a sprinter. The flight time for any arrow at 100 yards is like comparing a sloth to a thoroughbred. You can watch the flight which allows any natural movement of any animal to occur during the flight time. There is far too much risk of a bad hit due to natural animal movement at that distance for me to even consider a shot. But no doubt it will be nicer option for 50 or so.
 

esshup

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2008
Messages
768
Location
N. Central Indiana
Nope, all three drop their shoulders simultaneously and the one on the far left could not directly see either of the other two bucks. The only explanation I could come up with is that they all heard the sound and turned to run. I don’t know if the deer around us are more skittish because they have been hunted so hard for decades but I definitely do not have the same issue when rifle hunting.
I agree with you on that it is the sound. Can't tell you how many deer I've had react to the noise of the crossbow, alert, calm, looking straight, away or at me.

That's why I'm frustrated with the crossbow manufacturers NOT publishing db data on their bows and even more frustrated with the ATA in not making a set of regulations on how db should be measured and requiring the mfg's to add that in their specifications sheet for the bows.
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
2,920
Location
Michigan
That's why I'm frustrated with the crossbow manufacturers NOT publishing db data on their bows and even more frustrated with the ATA in not making a set of regulations on how db should be measured and requiring the mfg's to add that in their specifications sheet for the bows.
Absolutely no reason why this shouldn't be available. They publish their pride in their triggers so why not how loud they are!
 

Peddler 76

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2018
Messages
385
Location
Oswego,NY
I think you both answered the db questions. If they wanted you to know they would tell you.

You could always test drive one at a shop to hear for yourself.
 

Recent Posts

Top