Primer sealant

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Kenny0709, May 19, 2014.

  1. Kenny0709

    Kenny0709 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    120
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Does anyone here use primer sealant?
     
  2. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,058
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Good question! However, I don't use them as I don't see the need in my reloading at this time.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 8, 2018
  3. dig

    dig Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    695
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    I have used it a couple times. Sealed rounds prior to Alaska hunts as I am usually soaking wet! Really not certain if it made a difference; however, gave a little peice of mind. Bought the sealer from Midway.
     
  4. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,058
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    I probably would have done the same thing.
     
  5. g0rd0

    g0rd0 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    589
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    I have never used a sealant. A friend of mine uses clear nail polish and is quite happy with his results. He paints the inside of the pocket edges just before primeing and swears by the results.
     
  6. Korhil78

    Korhil78 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Unless you are going to be dunking your rounds in water, there is really no need for it. But if it gives you confidence in your ammo working by all means do it because that is what is gonna help put the meat on the table!
     
  7. davkrat

    davkrat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    656
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    I reload more for waterfowl hunting than anything else. I have ended up will shells sitting in pockets full of water more times than I can count. I've never used sealant on the primer as they press fit so tightly and I have never had a dud round with my waterfowl loads. I am more concerned about the steel shot rusting in to a solid slug than the primer getting wet.

    If I were to go on a hunt like alaska I would take about 20 rounds and keep them in a plastic bag to stay dry. I doubt you'd get enough moisture in your gun to soak the primers. At the end of the hunt if it made you feel better just discard the 4 or 5 rounds you kept in your gun. The backup shells safe in plastic in your pack should be perfectly fine.
     
  8. Kenny0709

    Kenny0709 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    120
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Thanks guys, I had the same thoughts as you, but I was curious to see if I was missing something. The conditions I hunt in can get nasty but I have never had a problem with a round not going off. Did have a firing pin freeze on me once, but that was my fault. Good stuff guys, I pick-up a great deal of info on this site!
     
  9. davkrat

    davkrat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    656
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Honestly the worst experience I've had with moisture and a rifle was hunting in the snow with my .270. I used to load my rounds right at the lands and must have gotten some snow on the bullet. I went to pull the shell from the chamber and out came the case and a shower of powder. Standing there freezing wet with a bullet lodged in my walnut and steel walking stick was no fun. Needless to say I never loaded another hunting round close to the lands again!
     
  10. dig

    dig Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    695
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    In extreme cold you will get some metal contraction. I have had the same thing happen and pulled a bullet. I now insure the throat and barrel are thoroughly cleaned of lube by swabbing with alcohol. Also I load a few thousand off the lands and of course full length size. The stock Winchesters in 270 WSM are notorious for this. After a few mishaps in the fields you learn some of the thing you read on the boards regarding accuracy are not applicable to Feild conditions. By the way it happened to me on a dear hunt on Kodiak, worst case scenario. I learned from a previous lesson to carry a folding rod. Which was in camp a few miles away thank goodness. Guide was packing a .416.

    Ergo I started sealing my primers for those trips.
     
  11. T3-OleMan

    T3-OleMan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    638
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    When I went to AK (pre pipeline) and when I go to CO every year for ELK hunting I use the nail polish but I take it up one level and use the Hunter Orange polish. My process is a big drop on the primer and press the thumb on it and drag the excess off and wipe primer with paper towel. I am not making the case longer this way and the Orange ring is all the way around the primer and I can verify it. Also paint the neck union and wipe off all that will come off. My main worry is getting some Rem Oil (or WD-40 in an emergency) on the primer after I come in from below zero freezing rain & snow and spray the empty gun with Rem Oil and wipe it off. Some got on the firing pin-then the primer- back in my younger life and the 270 failed to fire a few days later. If you seal it, nothing can go wrong, go wrong, go wrong! :rolleyes: Only do it on expensive hunts and I can identify the cases anytime.
    Good luck.
     
  12. Kenny0709

    Kenny0709 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    120
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Sounds a lot like my experience, got rem oil on the firing pin and froze. Took me 2 days to thaw it out. I will never do that again! I'm not a big fan of rem oil!!