? On my new neck bushing dies

445 supermag

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Guys I just got redding match FL neck bushing s type dies. Now the bushing don't come with the dies. How do I know what size to get. I will be getting my rifle. REM 700 SENDERO this week as its finally on its way to me. I have 100 new in box norma 7mm rem mag brass all waiting. I just dont know what to do about getting the correct bushings to neck size.

Do I just take any old 7 mag ammo and measure the outside diameter and subtract .001 and .002 and go from there. Or do I have to load a new norma brass then measure and do the subtraction?

Or am I thinking too much and there is a standard one can use for any 7mm mag?

Thanks

Brian
 

newmexkid

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That's what I did. I ordered the .001 and the .002. I ended up going with the .001. With just that amount of sizing I feel the bullet slide into the case with the greatest of ease. I got good groups with my 1st loads and never tried the .002 bushing. My shooting buddy said my bullets were going to fall out. Hasn't happened yet!! LOL. Not very scientific approach but, it working for me.
 

243Lapua

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You need to actually make yourself a dummy round with the brass and bullet combination you are going to use. Measure the outside diameter of the neck with the bullet inserted into the brass. Subtract .001 or .002 of the reading of the caliper and order our bushings. That's how I do it.
 

IAHNTR

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Also, when you do have some loaded and shooting, put a couple rounds in the mag well and shoot a couple times and remeasure the base to ogive on the rounds in the mag (or however you are measuring seating depth) to see if the light neck tension is too light and the seating depth is changing on recoil.
 

445 supermag

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Also, when you do have some loaded and shooting, put a couple rounds in the mag well and shoot a couple times and remeasure the base to ogive on the rounds in the mag (or however you are measuring seating depth) to see if the light neck tension is too light and the seating depth is changing on recoil.

Thanks. Will do!
 

Bill Johnson

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You need to actually make yourself a dummy round with the brass and bullet combination you are going to use. Measure the outside diameter of the neck with the bullet inserted into the brass. Subtract .001 or .002 of the reading of the caliper and order our bushings. That's how I do it.

You've spent alot of money for no benefit if you do not know the thickness and uniformity of the neck walls. Typical Winchester/Remington/Hornady/YouNameIt brass have neck wall that vary in thickness, typically, from .012 to .018. On the same piece of brass.

Unless neck walls are consistant and uniform, bushing dies are no better then standard dies, maybe not even as good.

Norma and Lapua do produce much better than average brass and can usually be counted on to be useable with bushing dies without neck turning. In this case, I, as 243Lapua suggested, seat the bullet, measure diameter in 2 to 3 different locations and order bushings -.002 and .003. Especially in heavier calibers with large charges (like 7MM Mag), you need sufficient neck tension to delay bullet movement long enough to ensure good ignition.

Just my $0.02.
 

445 supermag

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You've spent alot of money for no benefit if you do not know the thickness and uniformity of the neck walls. Typical Winchester/Remington/Hornady/YouNameIt brass have neck wall that vary in thickness, typically, from .012 to .018. On the same piece of brass.

Unless neck walls are consistant and uniform, bushing dies are no better then standard dies, maybe not even as good.

Norma and Lapua do produce much better than average brass and can usually be counted on to be useable with bushing dies without neck turning. In this case, I, as 243Lapua suggested, seat the bullet, measure diameter in 2 to 3 different locations and order bushings -.002 and .003. Especially in heavier calibers with large charges (like 7MM Mag), you need sufficient neck tension to delay bullet movement long enough to ensure good ignition.

Just my $0.02.

Thanks Bill. I did just that. Loaded up a 168 VLD and measured several times over and got .312 And just ordered .310 and .309 nitride bushings.

thats also why I bought norma brass for its quality and uniformity.

Again thanks for your input
 
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