Observations and advice on the effects of wind in coulees and valleys

Discussion in 'Extreme Long Range Hunting & Shooting (ELR)' started by Canhunter35, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    I'm wondering about everyone's observations of doping wind in:
    1- across a coulee with wind blowing down the coulee. (I've found it acts like a funnel and have begun adding 15% wind hold to what my kestrel is recording.) what are other people's observations?

    2- shooting length wise with the coulee and the effects of wind blowing across the coulee. (I know it can swirl as it comes over the hill and descends into the depression, but am wondering if anyone has advice on how to gauge it accurately for a 1st round hit.

    Hopefully what I'm describing makes sense
    Thanks
     
  2. THEIS

    THEIS Well-Known Member

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    calib likes this.
  3. NEMTHunter

    NEMTHunter Well-Known Member

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    In for the same information.
     
  4. Lpart

    Lpart Well-Known Member

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    Tagging in
     
  5. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    What you're describing makes perfect sense. The problem with coming with a solution for a 1st round hit is that there are too many variables to establish a standard. Coulees and valleys are two different creatures.
    Valleys are either U shaped or V shaped. Coulees have vertical boundaries with intervening flat lands that vary, often greatly, in width. Whether it's a valley or coulee, I use whatever natural indicator that's available to make a wind call. Grasses or dust moving in opposing directions indicate alternating air currents, vortexes, etc. Updrafts, even short lived episodes, can be detected by small particles moving on the air currents.
    A "first round hit" is the product of your familiarity with your immediate environment, how observed wind behaviors are most likely to affect your shot based upon what you know about your bullet and muzzle velocity, and how well you remain true to the basics of good marksmanship.
    There are no short cuts to wind reading. The anemometers will give you only an immediate wind reading in a fixed location for the present moment.
    Practice; take the shot, call the shot, analyze the results - then shoot again.
    Best of luck to ya .....
    gun) - - - - - - - - - - - - - (x)
     
  6. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    Theis, those articles are pretty in depth, I did not realize wind increased in speed when it hits an incline in the terrain.

    Nothing beats practice and observation in the end though
     
  7. RobStar

    RobStar Well-Known Member

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    Something I've never quite been able to get a definitive answer on or photograph of is what exactly a "coulee" is. It seems to be a very common term but depending on who I ask and what state they live in I get varied answers. I've been out west for 14 years now and the "coulee" is elusive! Perhaps it is where locals send you to snipe hunt! ;-)

    ~Robert
     
  8. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    Lol, and here I thought it was because I'm Canadian. I've always used coulee to describe a small valley.
     
  9. RobertDLee905

    RobertDLee905 New Member

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  10. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    Like Theis, I try to vision the air flow like water flow, particularly with valleys, shelves, coulees, and disruptions to the topography. IMO, complex terrain features such as these are by far the most difficult of LR hunting shots.. In this terrain, I have many times passed on the shot, or tried to re-locate if a gusty wind was greater then 10mph and the distance much further then 500- 600 yards. This is better then risking a wounded animal. The wind can many times work for you for a more certain shot. As a general approach, I like to get multiple distance wind reads from grass, leaves, or mirage. Lots of practice is the only way to get better, and, also lets you understand the conditions when a first shot hit is risky and Plan B is a good idea.
     
  11. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    taggin too
     
  12. BigGrizz

    BigGrizz Active Member

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    We better take care of the definitions first. A coulee will be any of the formations you see below with low elevations contained within points of higher elevations with a near 90-degree slope. The second picture does the formation the most justice.
    22396732092_7bf4d290f4_b.jpg HU-Ranch-Coulee.jpg Home-photo-2010.jpg
     
    Barrelnut likes this.
  13. geo4061

    geo4061 Well-Known Member

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    Theis, I love your comparison to water. Wish I had heard of that a long time ago. It does not take very much wind to humble you when your shooting 500 plus.
     
  14. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    Not trying to steal the thread but it feel it can add to the OP's question. Whats the though these days about the bullet being affected by wind more at the shooter vs. at the further range in say, the same environment as we were talking about?