Newbe concerning using new un-fired brass

QuietTexan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
166
Location
Texas
I iron out all the necks of new brass with the LE Wilson NEW Sizing Mandrel, then drop each case into a SAAMI spec case gauge for body size. If they need a quick resize I run into a bushing die without the bushing or anything going into the neck. Usually I never need do the second step, but my last box of Nosler 338 Lapua Mag brass I had two I ran into the body die out of 50. Don't know if it's a cardinal sin or not, but it seems to work. I figure they're moreso just out of round a bit and that's why they stick in the gauge. With my slotted Sheridan gauge I can usually see where they're sticking, turn them 90* and don't see it anymore.

 

J-B welder

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Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
102
Location
Selkirk
The original load was a max. load. I plan to drop 10% and work up in 1.0 grain increments. Then refine in 0.2 grain changes. The brass I was using, and I had a lot of once fired, was RP brass.
I must confess, I have not compared RP brass with Lapua. I have never done a water volume comparison and am not sure how to do so and get an accurate reading. Any suggestions/references will be appreciated.
Just cruising through pages from before I joined and came across this. Here's the method I use for measuring case capacity. Seems to work and it's pretty easy.

Case capacity measurement method
 

FrogFire7

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Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
403
Location
Pennsylvania
I'd say you should always resize new brass. If you are concerned about over working your brass, maybe take one piece at your starting charge and fire it. Should give you a good reference for how to set your sizing die. However, it's always a good idea to size new brass and get a consistent starting platform.

As far as deburring/trimming, uniforming, etc... that's up to you and what your end goal is. You may benefit from trimming the necks (if needed) after sizing. Just another step towards consistency.

Reloading is a rabbit hole. You can make it as simple as seat primer, dump powder and seat a bullet. Or, you can cull brass by weight or volume, uniform primer pockets, deburr flash holes, anneal every X number of firings, turn your case necks, weigh and measure ogive on bullets and sort by length, get special powder scales to measure fractions of grains, etc. I personally could drive myself crazy with that stuff. But for the informal shooting I do mostly, a lot of that is irrelevant since I'm not at the level of precision as a shooter (or probably with my equipment).

Good luck and happy shooting!
 

epags

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Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Messages
198
Location
Oxnard, CA
Reloading is a rabbit hole. You can make it as simple as seat primer, dump powder and seat a bullet. Or, you can cull brass by weight or volume, uniform primer pockets, deburr flash holes, anneal every X number of firings, turn your case necks, weigh and measure ogive on bullets and sort by length, get special powder scales to measure fractions of grains, etc. I personally could drive myself crazy with that stuff. But for the informal shooting I do mostly, a lot of that is irrelevant since I'm not at the level of precision as a shooter (or probably with my equipment).

Good luck and happy shooting!
Yep. A real rabbit hole. I am somewhere between an informal shooter and an anal shooter (LOL). As a retired civil engineer I am somewhat anal but have chosen not to join the competition shooting group. Just trying to get as good a group as my rifles can provide (with my tinkering with bedding and triggers). So far I have avoided the volume testing; neck turning and special powder scales. Get behind me Satan (temptation)!
Thanks every one for your comments.
 

FrogFire7

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
403
Location
Pennsylvania
Yep. A real rabbit hole. I am somewhere between an informal shooter and an anal shooter (LOL). As a retired civil engineer I am somewhat anal but have chosen not to join the competition shooting group. Just trying to get as good a group as my rifles can provide (with my tinkering with bedding and triggers). So far I have avoided the volume testing; neck turning and special powder scales. Get behind me Satan (temptation)!
Thanks every one for your comments.

I'm basically the same level at reloading.

I often compare reloading with my attempts at scent control during archery season. You can drive yourself into insanity with it. Almost can get superstitious about the scent control stuff. Reloading I guess you (maybe) get more obvious returns. But with either, there is always that ooooooone more step you could take...
 

MagnumManiac

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2008
Messages
2,705
My prep on new brass is the same as once fired EXCEPT I do NOT FL size the brass.
I run the brass through a neck sizer, then a mandrel to get the desired neck size I want, then I do flash holes, prime and load.
I do not trim until brass is stable and holding it’s spring back consistently. I also anneal after every FIRING before sizing.
I also do flash holes every few firings again just to get any carbon out.
I run my brass necks long in my comp guns, within .010” of the end of the chamber and trim when it is .005” from that length.
I have never seen a new case touched by a FL die other than on the neck, so see no need to FL size or body size it.
The 6.5 PRC may be an exception if the die problem described is an issue.

Cheers.
 

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