Neck Tension

RODSTRADLEY

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Jul 15, 2013
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43
Location
OHIO
Your AR10 will treat brass differently than the bolt guns. And creedmoors are chambered so tight. turn half of your test loads and see if it makes any difference. My AR10 is hard on brass. And the brass is why hotter then my bolts. You can't pick it up right away. If you size your brass like a bolt gun. You can run into feeding problems. i found that annealing and full length sizing with at least.003 tension. Will keep those 140 class bullets from moving when that bolt strips them and slams them into the chamber
After thinking about it, you know that I can't resist shouting it semi but that is not really the reason I am building it for. You know when building something I just load and go the get the bugs out. I have read somewhere about .005 was the figure that sticks in my head? Who knows the .003 sounds like a good starting point, I'ii just have to spend time and money! As of now sure got the time!
 

Steve gavette

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Jun 22, 2019
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85
Location
Glendale, AZ
New to reloading, and I don't think I understand the process for determining neck tension. Several here have said they test the tension, how exactly is that accomplished? If I use a regular full length resizing die, will the neck tensions vary significantly? If I use a bushing die, will I need several different bushing to accommodate different cases, or do I always turn the necks to the lowest common thickness of case? Thanks very much
 

L.Sherm

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Jul 26, 2017
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Theres different ways to do it, if you have just a FL resizing die you can get different size expander buttons from Whiddens or use a bushing die without the expander button and different size bushings.
You can also get expander mandrels in different sizes to size your necks with for different neck tension which is becoming more popular because it's easier to keep runout low on your cases.
Your gonna get different opinions on what's the best just like everything else, I would do as much research as you can and decide whats best for you in what your trying to achieve.
 

L.Sherm

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Personally if your new to reloading I would get more experience in your reloading before worrying about neck tension.
I would understand how to set up dies correctly especially for .002-.003 shoulder bump and to get your lowest runout on your cases.
 

misterc01

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Feb 15, 2019
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374
Location
Florida Panhandle
As new reloader, what I was told was "Don'l get hung up on the advanced stuff until you know the basics" and that worked for me. As I gained experience, I got new tools to get the precsion I was looking for.
 

L.Sherm

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Jul 26, 2017
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Get you some comparators for measuring bump to set your dies up correctly, without them your guessing.
Alex Wheeler has some great videos there worth watching.
 

misterc01

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Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
374
Location
Florida Panhandle
Well, I am so new I don't know what is basic and advanced. 😃
Note; one newbie to andther stuff to follow! Steve - I absolutely know that feeling!!!!! Took a reloading class, and instructor said: "some people enjoy reloading, other don't," and over half say: "Thanks - but I will just buy off-the-shelf." A lot depends on what you reload for - long range precision takes more time and "stuff" than for mass quantities - say 9mm or .223 for plinking. When I first started, I got a single-stage press, dies, caliper and ammo check gauges. I checked e youtube videos for my caliber(s), differenet reloading topics, Shooting Sports Foundation videos on overall shooting "stuff," PLUS things like the RCBS free reloading handbook (or anything free I could read.) Get a manufacturer's manual for what you want to load, and couple more for reference. Log everything you load, shoot, etc. I use a reloading checklsit to esnure I stay consistent and don't forget a step. As I went on, and learned more, added what I ineeded to load the ammo I wanted. IMHO neck turning and neck tension adjustments are advanced topics - but simple concepts. The neck needs to be a consistent thickness to hold the bullet evenly all the way around - so measure it. If it is the same at the four cardinal points - it is consistent. If not, then turning is indicated and there are lots of tools to use. Neck tension is how tightly the neck holds the bullet when bullet is seated. Simple way to understand it: measure the outside diameter of a loaded manufacturse round, then the outside diameter of the bullet you want to reload. The difference is the neck tension on the manufacturer's round. To set YOUR desired neck tension, you set/change the neck diameter of your empty case, add the amount of final neck tension you want, add about .001' for brass springback and you have your neck tension. Fl resizing die, mandrel, or neck bushing and die - choices are ours. They all have the same goal. Go slow, measure EVERYTHING,, ask if nto sure (even call manufacturers) and have fun!
 
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