My thoughts on Long-range shooting/hunting

wjm1000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2005
Messages
70
Location
Johnstown, PA
I've been long-range hunting (over 40 years) and have been a 1000-yard completive shooter for a number of years and winning a IBS/NBRSA national championship for 1000 yard score and two state championships for smallest group.

First off to be successful you must have excellent equipment to do the job, that's fairly easy to do if you have the money to buy what is required. In my opinion the weakest link in the chain is the scope, buy the best you can afford, the rifle can sometimes be purchased of the shelf, manufactured by several commercial rifle makers. That being said in my opinion if you're going to spend your hard-earned dollars, go to a qualified gun builder and have a custom barrel chambered in your favorite caliber. That will take care of part of the equation.

Now for the hard part is acquiring the skill set. I really don't know how to tell you how to go about it, other than I practice when the conditions are bad at the longest range I can 300 to 500 yards or so would be good. Shorter ranges can work but not be as dramatic of changes as the longer ranges. I should mention quality ammunition is of major importance. (Good scope + good rifle + bad ammo = bad groups.) When shooting in windy conditions I pay close attention to the wind in front of the rifle, when the bullet exits the barrel gravity and wind acts on it immediately and stars to pull it down and in the direction of the wind and I think it effects it the most at that moment a few thousands of deflections at the muzzle can be huge at distance. I also look at the conditions along the bullets path that can counteract or add to what's happening at the muzzle and I'll adjust accordingly. I don't pay too much attention to what's happening at the target except for light conditions, because the bullet is already there.

In all honesty while having many one shot kills at distance, I've also had my share of near misses on the first shot, but if having an opportunity for a second shot I more often than not make a clean kill. In the many years of hunting long-range, I never crippled one and have it get away. On rare occasions I did have to shoot an animal again not wanting to let it bleed-out and suffer.

I'll probably have a lot of blow-back on this and maybe called BS but this is what works for me.
 
Didn't say what cal. you shoot/hunt, how far you shoot at animals or how many, so no blow back from me thus far;). 600 and less is my self imposed limit on animals ( a lot can go wrong that we can't control in the time required up to and especially after that) and the furthest I have shot anything was an elk at 505 and several in the 400s - all drt except one and that was entirely my fault, took 2 more to end it. I have had to shoot less than a handful more than once and those were usually all my fault as well. (The .340 can make up for some minor errors on my part, but certainly not all) If needed, I'd shoot at a terrorist at any range I thought I could remotely hit them and would hope everyone else would as well!
 
I've been long-range hunting (over 40 years) and have been a 1000-yard completive shooter for a number of years and winning a IBS/NBRSA national championship for 1000 yard score and two state championships for smallest group.

First off to be successful you must have excellent equipment to do the job, that's fairly easy to do if you have the money to buy what is required. In my opinion the weakest link in the chain is the scope, buy the best you can afford, the rifle can sometimes be purchased of the shelf, manufactured by several commercial rifle makers. That being said in my opinion if you're going to spend your hard-earned dollars, go to a qualified gun builder and have a custom barrel chambered in your favorite caliber. That will take care of part of the equation.

Now for the hard part is acquiring the skill set. I really don't know how to tell you how to go about it, other than I practice when the conditions are bad at the longest range I can 300 to 500 yards or so would be good. Shorter ranges can work but not be as dramatic of changes as the longer ranges. I should mention quality ammunition is of major importance. (Good scope + good rifle + bad ammo = bad groups.) When shooting in windy conditions I pay close attention to the wind in front of the rifle, when the bullet exits the barrel gravity and wind acts on it immediately and stars to pull it down and in the direction of the wind and I think it effects it the most at that moment a few thousands of deflections at the muzzle can be huge at distance. I also look at the conditions along the bullets path that can counteract or add to what's happening at the muzzle and I'll adjust accordingly. I don't pay too much attention to what's happening at the target except for light conditions, because the bullet is already there.

In all honesty while having many one shot kills at distance, I've also had my share of near misses on the first shot, but if having an opportunity for a second shot I more often than not make a clean kill. In the many years of hunting long-range, I never crippled one and have it get away. On rare occasions I did have to shoot an animal again not wanting to let it bleed-out and suffer.

I'll probably have a lot of blow-back on this and maybe called BS but this is what works for me.
Sound advice in my opinion.
 
I've been long-range hunting (over 40 years) and have been a 1000-yard completive shooter for a number of years and winning a IBS/NBRSA national championship for 1000 yard score and two state championships for smallest group.

First off to be successful you must have excellent equipment to do the job, that's fairly easy to do if you have the money to buy what is required. In my opinion the weakest link in the chain is the scope, buy the best you can afford, the rifle can sometimes be purchased of the shelf, manufactured by several commercial rifle makers. That being said in my opinion if you're going to spend your hard-earned dollars, go to a qualified gun builder and have a custom barrel chambered in your favorite caliber. That will take care of part of the equation.

Now for the hard part is acquiring the skill set. I really don't know how to tell you how to go about it, other than I practice when the conditions are bad at the longest range I can 300 to 500 yards or so would be good. Shorter ranges can work but not be as dramatic of changes as the longer ranges. I should mention quality ammunition is of major importance. (Good scope + good rifle + bad ammo = bad groups.) When shooting in windy conditions I pay close attention to the wind in front of the rifle, when the bullet exits the barrel gravity and wind acts on it immediately and stars to pull it down and in the direction of the wind and I think it effects it the most at that moment a few thousands of deflections at the muzzle can be huge at distance. I also look at the conditions along the bullets path that can counteract or add to what's happening at the muzzle and I'll adjust accordingly. I don't pay too much attention to what's happening at the target except for light conditions, because the bullet is already there.

In all honesty while having many one shot kills at distance, I've also had my share of near misses on the first shot, but if having an opportunity for a second shot I more often than not make a clean kill. In the many years of hunting long-range, I never crippled one and have it get away. On rare occasions I did have to shoot an animal again not wanting to let it bleed-out and suffer.

I'll probably have a lot of blow-back on this and maybe called BS but this is what works for me.
THIS sounds like the explanation I gave to a clown named newberg on another site when he told me 5 or 600 yard shots are "unethical". I should sneak up to 100 or 150 at the most. After a long argument I told him to shove it where the sun don't shine. He then banned me from that site. Oh well. S..t happens!
 
Didn't say what cal. you shoot/hunt, how far you shoot at animals or how many, so no blow back from me thus far;). 600 and less is my self imposed limit on animals ( a lot can go wrong that we can't control in the time required up to and especially after that) and the furthest I have shot anything was an elk at 505 and several in the 400s - all drt except one and that was entirely my fault, took 2 more to end it. I have had to shoot less than a handful more than once and those were usually all my fault as well. (The .340 can make up for some minor errors on my part, but certainly not all) If needed, I'd shoot at a terrorist at any range I thought I could remotely hit them and would hope everyone else would as well!
The two furthest shots I've made was on a deer at 1310 yards it took me three shots I hit tree limbs the first two shots. The second longest was 1335 on a bear. The shooting gods were with me and killed on the first shot. 338/408 300 grain bullet 3250 fps and I've taken several deer at any where from 600 to over 1000 yards.
 

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I agree that (other than the nut behind the trigger😂) the scope & mounting hardware are the weakest links to the system. As far as acquiring skill set, the best way is to get some quality professional instruction. This will be your best investment as it’s in yourself. Some try to spend money to buy hits when all you’re invested in is unused potential.
 
The two furthest shots I've made was on a deer at 1310 yards it took me three shots I hit tree limbs the first two shots. The second longest was 1335 on a bear. The shooting gods were with me and killed on the first shot. 338/408 300 grain bullet 3250 fps and I've taken several deer at any where from 600 to over 1000 yards.
That's not for my taste and Len does not like or allow ethics discussions, but seems you have the skills, tools and the horsepower. Agree with your summary on tools completely and that the true weakest link is the shooter or as Bravo4 said the nut behind the trigger -aka- the dope behind the gun, not the dope on the gun;).
 
I agree that (other than the nut behind the trigger😂) the scope & mounting hardware are the weakest links to the system. As far as acquiring skill set, the best way is to get some quality professional instruction. This will be your best investment as it's in yourself. Some try to spend money to buy hits when all you're invested in is unused potential.
Instructors are a dirt cheap way to improve in any sport, especially shooting. Cheapest way to get there, no matter what they charge if they are good.
 
Where I elk hunt short shots are just not practical. Thick scrub oak only allows much vision looking cross canyon at an elevating terrain, and even then I have watched herds in excess of one hundred animals simply disappear into it. When my cousin told me about the place I thought he was full of it, but it is true; if you want to hunt elk in some country sneaking up closer is just not an option. I'm really glad someone figured out targets can be hit reliably at distance. I'm very picky on my shots, I just don't shoot if there is much wind at all, I prefer first light no wind, and I don't shoot past noon or so as getting a critter out of there is no piece of cake.
 
1300 yards is a long ways! I was just farting around fire forming brass with 250 Atips ( not a fan) and no load work up, at a shadow on a boulder at 1202 yards at a 15 degree incline,off a tripod 😂 and it was taking so long for the bullet to get there I could spot my impacts even though I was coming completely off target. I definitely wouldn’t feel comfortable shooting at an animal at that distance around where I’m at. Way too easy for them to disappear wounded.
 
THIS sounds like the explanation I gave to a clown named newberg on another site when he told me 5 or 600 yard shots are "unethical". I should sneak up to 100 or 150 at the most. After a long argument I told him to shove it where the sun don't shine. He then banned me from that site. Oh well. S..t happens!
This got my attention. Especially when you take into consideration people who live and hunt in wide Open spaces 500 yard shots are pretty much the norm and they've been doing it since a young age they are pretty much automatic this also is irrelevant for people who shoot routinely and competitive matches such as NRLl Hunter and PRS 4 to 500 yards are your close shots and they are automatic guaranteed hits. To say hunting at these ranges is unethical is ridiculous. Im not saying everyone is capable of doing it but would hope doing so are on point. Just my 2¢
 
THIS sounds like the explanation I gave to a clown named newberg on another site when he told me 5 or 600 yard shots are "unethical". I should sneak up to 100 or 150 at the most. After a long argument I told him to shove it where the sun don't shine. He then banned me from that site. Oh well. S..t happens!
Lets face it, some people just cannot shoot and have little to no inclination to learn.

We've all seen many of these in our lives.
 
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